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Full text of "Antioch News 11/15/1996"






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VOL 110 NO. 45 




Entertaining 
education 

American Girl dolls take 
owners along on a trip 
through history. Stories and 
hands-on activities provide 
exciting ways for youngsters 
to learn the lessons of the 
past. 

— Fortnore, see Page Bl 

Depke departs 

. The political climate of 
Lake County is changing as a 
familiar face 
fades. Sent 
packing from 
the county 
board, Warren 
Township 
Supervisor Bob Depke will 
call it quits after 35 years. 
— For more, see Page CI 

Rising waters 

Agencies seek solutions to 
Des Plaines River flooding. 
One proposed plan would . 
prevent overflow-in 
threatened areas but put 
Forest Preserve recreational, 
land under water. 

— For more, see Page CI 



INDEX 




At Home, .......B17 

Ban!<& Finance Cfl 

BusiNEss C6 

ClASSifiEd..... ....CI? 

CouNTy News..... CI 

Crossword 1 Bl 5 

EdiTORiAl/OpiNioN C4, 

HEAlikvATch B8 

Horoscope Bl 5 

Hot'Spots B12 

UkEllfE. .....Bl 

LeqAl Notices ,.,Al4& CI 1- 

LipsERviCE ...B21 

MoviEs... M 

ObiTUARJES .....CIO 



WhEREjoCAll 

Lake 1 ai h I Neyvspupcrs 

(847) 223-8161 

FAX(847) 223-8810 
e-mail: edit@lnd.eom 



mi c J 12/27/96 
MUII1CH TQUHSHIP LIMY 
757 KftlH STRIXT 
ftntioch 



** c " 7 ^ff40§H^ugyc MRnAnv-niSTRigr. 

757 N, Main Street 

IL 60002 ^I^HRfccI 



11 \J r 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 

©1996-A Schroeder Publication 



ANT1QCH NOVEMBER 1 5, 1 996 



THREE SECTIONS-64 PAGES 



50 CENTS 



Suit aims to 
ban toot-toot 

♦ Antioch residents sue 
village, Metra and Wisconsin 
Central in an ongoing effort 
to stop the blare of train 
whistles in the village 

ALEC 1UNGE 



Staff Reporter 

. As train whistles blow so do the tempers 
of some frustrated Antioch residents who 
have sued the village, Wisconsin Central and 
Metra in an attempt to get the seemingly 
incessant sounds to stop. 

Seven residents and property owners in 
Antioch filed the suit against the Village of 

Antioch, Mayor 
'My 3-year-old Marilyn Shine- 

granddauehter flug ' Wisc °nsin 

,. ° Central and 

won t even come to Metra> aIleging 

Visit me. She Says the railroad's 

that the 

trains' horns hurt 

her ears.' 



Cecile Kelly 



practice of blow- 
ing their horns 
while crossing. 
Antioch's six 
grade crossings is 
a nuisance. 

"We have tried 
to work with the railroads and the village 
authorities to get them to stop this practice, 
but to no avail," said James Duggan, one of 
the plaintiffs in a class action lawsuit filed in 
Lake County Circuit Court. "Our only redress 
See WHISTLE page A 10 




Compounding chemicals l&m » -: 

rCo.l 1 ege..of La ke^Go;untyr studen ts ;Matt M i odon ski , Tom ; ,Sm_i|h^aocU Sh i deh 
Khieroloumoum perform a chemistry experiment during Genera! Chemistry 121. 
Schools all over the country have scheduled special activities to mark American 
Education Week.— Photo by Linda Chapman 



Eighty-two miles to go before we sleep 




Jeff Quirk works on a road in Lotus Woods subdivision. The 
highway department is in the process of paving all 82 miles of 
township roads.— Photo by Linda Chapman 



ALECJUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

What does it take to fix a road? A lot more than most people 
imagine. 

Spending a morning with Antioch Township Highway 
Commissioner Mark Ring is a good way to get educated about what is 
going on. 

With 82 miles of roads to maintain, the Antioch Township 
Highway Department is the busiest in the county. 

Yet this hard-working crew manages to perform a heap of work. 

Start with road reconstruction. The township still has many dirt 
roads. The department is spending a lot of its manpower and effort 
towards updating narrow, aging roads designed for summer homes 
with little or no drainage. 

Ring showed the work highway crews performed to totally redo the 
road at the Rainer subdivision. There was no drainage other than 
some field tiles. The drainage work should have the hidden benefit of 
helping the septic fields. 

Sewer vote 

United Homeowners Association of Unincorporated 
Antioch (UHAUA) are hoping to put the sewer question to 
a referendum in April. 

— See page A3 

"During heavy rains the water ponds and seeps into the septic 
system," Ring said. "It can cause the systems to fail. We eliminate the 
ponding and therefore the people notice their septic fields working 
better." 

Ring added road crews fixed the existing drainage by adding pipes 
ranging from 21 inches to 6 inches. 

"If you keep the road dry it makes it easier to maintain. You don't 
have the big ice patches," Ring noted. 

The subdivision now has a 20-foot wide blacktop road where there 
was once a 14-foot gravel road. 

In addition, pipes are perforated plastic and yet are very durable. 
They have ridges and small holes for the water to get in. "They are 
easier to work with. It only takes one man," Ring said. 

The department also used crushed rock in the ditch area: The 
crushed rock acts as a filter to help clean up storm water before it 
See SEWER page A10 



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GoiviiviufNiiTy 

Officials seek spring 
vote for town sewers 



NoVEMbER 1 ?, 1 996 UkElANd NfWSpApERS 




ALEC IUNGE 



ferent line's. One of them would 
go through Grass Lake and 



Staff Reporter 

Antioch Township residents another option is along Routes 

will likely get to voice their opin- 59 and 173. 
ion on sewers at the April elec- The projected costs for the 

tion - sewer would be $13,995 with the 

County Board Member Judi Grass Lake plan or $14,255 with 

Martini and Carol Jonites, presi- the road plan. These costs would 

dent of United Homeowners of be paid over a 10-year period. 
Unincorporated Antioch, are All areas could be serviced, 

working together to get the issue Jonites noted the original study 



on the ballot. 
While there is a 
lot of ground to 
cover, it remains 
a priority to let 
the voters have 
their say on this 
issue. 

Martini and 
Jonites want to 
get a pulse from 
the public. The 



The next UHAUA 

meeting Nov. 19, 7:30 

p.m., will again deal 

with the sewer issue 

and the process that 

needs to be followed to 

get it on a referendum. 



only showed 
1,700 homes 
and now it is 
expanded to 
5,400 homes. 

"They aren't 
going to skip 
subdivisions," 
she said. 

A legal descrip- 
tion must be 
established to 



referendum would be advisory put the issue on the ballot. Bob 

and not binding in any way. Devery, the engineer, who wrote 

"It would give the people a the report, told Jonites he can 

voice," Jonites said. "It would be a provide information which will 

place to start. We need to find out aid in developing the description, 

if they want it," County officials indicate this 

What is needed for a referen- issue would be put on the back 

dum is an attorney to draw up the burner and is probably about five 

referendum from a legal descrip- years away, a time frame which is 

tion of the land. A petition needs to unacceptable to the parties 

be developed and signed by enough involved with getting the referen- 

residents to get on the ballot. dum on the ballot. 

Martini has said she will work "We're not pleased with that, 



diligently at the county level to 
make this issue more of a priority. 
She hopes the new county board 
will begin to shift priorities. 

The county study projected 
costs to unincorporated town- 
ship residents based on two dif- 



not at all," Jonites said of the time 
frame. 

The next UHAUA meeting 
Nov. 19, 7:30 p.m., will again deal 
with the sewer issue and the 
process that needs to be followed 
to get it on a referendum. 



BrjeFs 



Meeting date change 

District 34 school board will meet Tuesday, Nov. 26, rather 
than Nov. 19 as orginally scheduled. The meeting will be held at 
W. C. Petty School, 850 Highview Drive. 

It's a mixer 

Antioch Chamber of Commerce & Industry is sponsoring a 
mixer, Nov. 21, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Betty Sills Gallery, 909 
Main Street. Those interested in attending must R.S.V.P. by 
Nov, 19. For more information or to register call the chamber 
office at 395-2233. 

Hunter safety offered 

A two-day hunter safety course is being offered at the 
Northern Illinois Conservation Club. Those attending the class 
will receive certificates. The sessions run from 8-4 p.m. Nov. 16 
and Nov. 17. Cost is $5. Bring your own lunch and beverages 
will be provided. For more information call Peter Poli at 414- 
862-6072 or Debbie Leticsas at 395-2642. 



Antioch News-Reporter 



Founded 1886 

Office of Publication: 30 South Whitney St., Grayslako, IL 60030. Phono (847)223-8161. 

Published weekly, periodical mall postage paid at Grayslako, IL 60030. 

Mall Subscription Rates: $24.50 Por Year by Mall paid In advance In Lake, Cook, Kenosha and 

McHenty Countios; elsewhere $35.00 Per Year by Mail paid In advance. 

Postmaster: Send address changos to Antioch News-Reporter, 30 South WhltnBy Street, P.O. Box 268, 

Grayslako, Illinois 60030. 



JflUJ OtS PRESS 



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Lakeland 

KcwBpnpcrs 



Antioch News-Reporter 
Lake Zurich Enterprise 

Lake Villa Record 
Mundelein News 
Grayslake Times ( 
Fox Lake Press' ' 



M.R. SCHROEDER 

Foundor-1 904- 1986 

WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

Publisher/President 

WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

General Manager 

RHONDA HETRICK BURKE 

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NEAL TUCKER MIMIK00B 

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(USPS 
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Going in style 

Mike Chebertte, Chris Clark, Jonathan Hardy and Donata D'Agostino are just a few of the lucky 
ones at Grass Lake School in Antioch to be treated to lunch at McDonalds and round trip ride 
in Big Johns Limosine. Through a gift wrap fund raiser, students were awarded prizes and par- 
ties for all of their hard work. — Photo by Linda Chapman 



Christmas season begins in Antioch 

Antioch officials are kicking off Christinas festivities and cookies sponsored by the Village of Antioch at the 

with Antioch's version of "12 Days of Christmas." comer of Main and Orchard. 

There will be an open house at the Antioch The village needs- residents to help decorate the 

Community Building from 9:30 a.m.-12 p.m., Saturday, tree, and drop off an ornament with die family name 

Nov. 16. Residents are encouraged to visit the new facili- at village hall between Nov. 16-27. Ornaments should 

ty and meet village officials while you enjoy refresh- be weather resistant. 
merits. Carriage rides will be available that evening 

The day includes carriage rides, from 6:30-9:30 p.m. and then 

and a historical walk as well. The Christmas Parade is Saturday and Sunday afternoons 

slated for Nov. 29, 6:30 from M P* m ' through Dec ' 22 ' 
p.m., on Main Street. 



The Christmas Parade is slated for 
Nov. 29, 6:30 p.m., on Main Street. The 
parade will travel east on Lake Street, 
north on Main Street, west on Orchard 
Street and south of Toft Street to drop 
Santa offat his destination, the Enchanted Castle. He will 
stay there to meet with children. 

The castle will be open on weekends from 1 1 a.m.- 
4 p.m. and on weekdays from 5:30-8 p.m.. If you can't 
see Santa, you can always address a letter to: Santa 
Claus, 100 Toyland Road, North Pole or by the mailbox 
outside the castle. 

Immediately following the parade, there will be a 
tree lighting ceremony with.caroling, hot chocolate, 



Those who spend $25 or more in 

town, will be entitled to a free 

carriage ride. 

On Saturday, Nov. 30, the First 
National Bank will be sponsoring the movie "Flipper." 
It will be shown at the Antioch Theater at 10:30 a.m.. 
Admission price is two food packages donated to the 
Antioch Food Pantry. 

The same day, the Chamber is sponsoring a chil- 
dren's show at the P M& L at 10:30 a.m. Again the 
same admission as the movie. 

For more information call the Chamber at 395- 
2233. 



ACHS levy looks to capture growth 



ALEC IUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

Antioch Community High School board is asking 
for a 12 percent increase in taxes, but officials admit 
the number is artificially high. 

In preparing for a tax levy, the district must ask 
for all that it projects in increased assessed valuation 
and projected new growth. Once the number is set, 
it can't be changed. 

"It is artificially high because we want to cover 
ourselves in the event we do have a high growth 
rate," explained Dr. Dennis Hockney, superinten- 
dent. 

Hockney noted the district had an 11 percent 
jump in Equalized Assessed Valuation (EAV) or total 
value of land in 1993. The last two years the number 
has averaged about 6 percent. 

The district's EAV is at $547 million and offi- 
cials project that number to rise 6.5 percent to 



$583 million. 

However, just because the district asks for the 
increase it doesn't mean it will get it. The district is 
only entitled to new construction and the cost of liv- 
ing increase from the state imposed tax cap. The cost 
of living is at about 3 percent. 

The board will hold a levy hearing, Nov. 21, 7:30 
p.m., at Lake Villa Elementary District office, 131 
McKinley Ave., Lake Villa. 

The board is asking for a levy of $1 1,201,000 com- 
pared with $9,965,000 last year. It amounts to a 12 
percent jump. 

If all goes well at the hearing, the board will 
adopt the levy and submit it to the Lake County 
Clerk's office. The clerk's office compares the dis- 
trict's request against the tax cap and its new 
growth numbers, and will allow the district an 
adjusted rate which will be lower than what the 
board is seeking. 



' . . • '. : . . . 



UkElANd Newspapers NovemBer 15, 1996 



f 






i 
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BRIEfs 



Cr afters wanted for event 

Calvary Christian School is now accepting craft space regis- 
tration for this year's fifth annual Cookie Walk and Craft Bazaar. 
The event will be held at the school, 134 Monaville Road, Lake 
Villa Dec. .7. For more information call the school at 356-6184. 

Choir Concert coming 

Antioch Upper Grade School Choir will have a concert on 
Tuesday, Nov. 26 at 7:30 p.m. 



Save those box tops 



District 34 PTSO is collecting General Mills box tops through 
Dec. 19. They ask parents to please save the box tops as they are 
collected once a month. Each top is worth 15 cents per box. The 
goal is to raise $200 this year. 

Petty Music program ahead 

A vocal music program is planned at W. C. Petty School for 
Wednesday, Nov. 20. 

Remember Thanksgiving schedule 

District 34 schools will have a 1:40 p.m. dismissal 
Wednesday, Nov. 27 for grades 4-8. Early dismissal for grades 1- 
3 is 2:20 p.m. Nov. 28, 29 there will be no school. 




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District 34 gets Internet access 



ALECJUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

District 34 students are now 
able to take a ride on the informa- 
tion superhighway. 

School officials installed a 
direct access to the Internet. The 
Internet is a collection of databases 
from throughout the world. 

"I have had a lot of teachers 
express interest in using it for 
reports and science projects," said 
Bob Brown, computer teacher who 
is working to get all the computers 
on-line. 

"It will allow students to do 
research outside the classroom," 
said Principal Deborah Kerr- 
Carpenter. 

Brown added he will have his 
students create their own web 



pages. These are pages designed by 
the people others across the world 
can access. 

The access was made possible 
by a grant from the Illinois State 
Board of Education called 
Energynet. Energynet is a weeklong 
seminar where students look at 
ways diey could save energy at a 
mock school. They take the pro- 
gram to their school and make rec- 
ommendations. 

Last year, students evaluated 
the light system at Antioch Upper 
Grade and made suggestions to 
make them more energy efficient. 
Coincidcntally, the school board 
approved modernizing the current 
light system doing many of the 
things the students suggested. 

The district had a dial-up con- 



nection to die Internet which was 
time consuming. 

Through the grant, the district 
was able to purchase a T-l line 
which provides access to a State 
Board of Education hub or main- 
frame in Lombard. 

Although only working for a 
week, Brown said students are 
already using the new technology. 

In addition, the district will 
have E-Mail capability. Already the 
first directory of E-Mail addresses 
of students and teachers was sent 
home with the last school bulletin. 

Brown said he is finishing 
installing die needed software in 
the school's three computer labs 
and eventually will provide the 
Internet to administration and 
staff as well. 



DUI prevention efforts recognized 



The National Commission 
Against Drunk Driving has present- 
ed the Commendation Award for 
Education and Prevention to the 
Northern Illinois Council on 



Alcoholism and Substance Abuse 
(NICASA). 

The award recognizes the not- 
for-profit agency for its collabora- 
tion with Antioch Community High 



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School on a youth DUI prevention 
program. Terrance Schiavone, 
NCADD president, said the awards 
committee "unanimously voted to 
present the Commendation Award 
in recognition of the outstanding 
commitment shown." 

Laurel Dahl, prevention 
administrator, said the agency has 
worked very closely with the high 
school over the past year "to pro- 
vide a program that gives students, 
parents and the community an 
awareness and a stronger sense of 
the effects of drinking and driving. 
"Our collaborative approach 
stresses that communication and 
cooperation are needed to have a 
positive impact in reducing alco- 
• hol-and other drug-related acci- 
dents." 

Dahl and Bill Hetland, corn^ 
munications coordinator/preven- 
tion specialist, worked closely on 
educational programming with 
high school officials, including Jim 
Kafer, athletic director, and Steve 
Wapon, who directs the school's 
driver education program. 

Staff, students and communi- 
ty representatives joined in the 
planning of an April 8 wellness fair 
that feauired the Dodge/Plymouth 
Neon Drunk Driving Simulator car. 
Approximately 125 students were 
able to drive the car and another 
225 students were passengers. 
Local dealerships and businesses 
helped raise $3,900 to sponsor the 
car, Dahl said. 

Other youth DUI prevention 
work included: 

A presentation by Hetland to 
400 athletes and 400 parents at the 
beginning of die school year on the 
state's "zero tolerance" law which 
prohibits anyone under the age of 
21 from having any alcohol in their 
system while driving, A n 

informational program for approx- 
imately 125 driver education stu- 
dents and parents about the risks 
of drinking and driving. NICASA 
representatives presented an 
overview of the state's DUI laws, 
insurance agent Tim Osmond 
spoke on liability issues and Lake 
County Coroner Barbara 
Richardson talked about her role in 
dealing with families that have lost 
a child due to vehicular crashes 
involving alcohol or other drugs. 

A survey of 450 students to 
determine attitudes about the risks 
of drinking and driving. The 
University of Illinois assisted 
NICASA Willi the survey develop- 
ment and analysis. 

Dahl said NICASA received 
exceptional cooperation from 
Antioch Community High School 
administrators and staff. 






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PblitE & FiRE 



NovcMbER 1 5, 1 996 UkcUNd Newspapers 



PolicE Beat 



Persons charged with a crime are innocent until proven guilty In a 
court of law. 

ANTIOCH 

Hey, what's in the truck 

Regelio Reigado, 50, of Chicago and Sergio Sanfola, 37, of 
Chicago, on Nov. 9, were arrested for theft. The two were spot- 
ted at the Prestige Metals dumpster with a sign that expressly 
said no trespassing. Police found their vehicle backed up next to 
the dumpster and the truck bed had a lot of aluminum metal in 
it. The two were then arrested, 

Don't be serving minors 

Jeffrey Vanhorn, 22, 309 Grays Drive, Antioch, on Nov. 10, 
was arrested for selling alcohol to a minor. He allegedly sold 
Richard Cerk, 20, 42417 N. Park, Antioch four beers. Police saw 
Cerk run quickly away from a tavern after it was closed at about 
3 a.m. and when they questioned him, believed he had a strong 
odor of alcohol on his breath. He had a blood alcohol content of 
* ■ .17, He was arrested for minor consumption of alcohol. 
Vanhorn denied he served Cerk any alcohol and that he only 
saw him in the establishment. 

Arrested for driving offenses 

Gary McCIellan, 21, 38185, State Park Road, Spring Grove, 
on Nov. 10, was arrested for driving with no valid license. Police 
stopped him knowing from prior contacts that he had no valid 
license. Two passengers in his car were also arrested for minor 
possession of alcohol. Adrian Ebner, 17, 1009 Millstone, Round 
Lake Beach, and Matthew Gadberding, 17, 32214 Alleghany, 
Grayslake, were arrested for minor consumption of alcohol as 
well. 

Steven Todd, 30, 27944, Riverside, Antioch, On Nov. 5, was 
arrested for driving with no valid drivers license. He was 
stopped for not having a rear registration light and was found to 
have no valid license. 

. LAKEVILLA 

Arrested for possession 

James Beaumont, 33, 41050 Prairie, Antioch, on Nov. 8, was 
arrested for possession of marijuana. He was stopped for having 
only one headlight working. He was found to have what is 
believed to be a small amount of marijuana in his vehicle. 

Arrested for intoxication 

Mark Plonka, 22, 40319 Fox Drive, Antioch, on Nov. 9, was 
arrested for public intoxication. He allegedly yelled obscenities 
at police officers arid told them to arrest him. He was then 
arrested. 

Arrested for driving offense 

Diane Dozier, 23, 1987 Cedar Lake Road, Round Lake Beach, 
on Nov. 8, was arrested for driving with a suspended license. 
She was stopped for not having a rear license plate light and 
was found to have a suspended license. 

Worker critical after 
driving off building roof 

A construction worker was pinned underneath an all-terrain vehi- 
cle (ATV) after he drove off a roof of a building under construction in 

Gurnee. 

Thomas Brenner, age 30, of Richton Park, was hospitalized in critical 
condition at Lutheran General Hospital in Park Ridge after he was flown via 
Flight For Life helicopter following die 8:11 a.m. accident on Nov. 9. 

"We got the call from a fellow construction worker. The victim was 
found laying under an ATV and we were told he was unconscious and 
not responsive. We still do not know how long he was underneath 
there," Gurnee Fire Chief Tim McGrath said. 

The worker fell some 30 feet off the roof of the building at 801 

Lakeside. 

"We know he was working by himself. He might have been blind- 
ed by the sun. He had massive internal injuries," McGrath said. 



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Sibling rivalry leads to stabbing 



TINA IYNN SW1ECH 

Staff Reporter 

An older brother was arrested 
and charged with felony assault 
after police were called to a house 
on the 200 block of Nippersink in 
Round Lake. 

The scuffle ensued between 
Patrick and Greg Mahoney 
around 9:25 p.m. Nov. 8. 

When police arrived they 
found Greg, 43, lying on top of 
Patrick, 46, in the pantry area of 
the kitchen. 

After the officer attempted to 
separate the two, Greg reportedly 
told them, "'He stabbed me! The 
knife is in the corner.' " 



Patrick related to police that 
his brother 'walked into the 
knife,' after he was only trying to 
intimidate him with it. 

Police noted blood on Greg's 
shirt, as well as on the floor. 
According to reports, Patrick said 
he and his brother had been 
arguing throughout the night. As 
he was attempting to leave, Greg 
jumped on top of him outside. 
Then Patrick went next door to 
yet another one of the brother's 
homes and retrieved a 12-inch 
blade knife. 

Greg was reportedly stabbed 
when he was pinned at knife- 
point in the kitchen. That's when 



the victim walked into the knife, 
Patrick said. 

Officers called Round Lake 
rescue for Greg who was trans- 
ported to Condell Medical Center 
in Libertyville, for a stab wound 
to the stomach. 

Patrick was read his rights 
and transported to Cencom 
where he awaited bond hearing. 

After contacting an assistant 
Lake County states attorney, offi- 
cers charged the elder Mahoney 
with class 3 felony charges 
including aggravated battery 
causing great bodily harm, and 
aggravated battery with a deadly 
weapon. 



Home fire causes $150,000 damage 



Fast action by a neighbor is 
being lauded by Gurnee Fire 
Dept. personnel. 

The fire the afternoon of Nov. 
4 caused an estimated $150,000. 
The blaze at 36300 Old Woods 
Drive started in a sofa in a base- 
ment and the damage estimate 
could rise. 

"A neighbor saw smoke com- 
ing from the chimney and 
thought something was unusual 
and called us. Then she saw that 
the windows were black and she 
called us again. She provided us 
with some good information," 
Gurnee Fire Chief Tim McGrath 
said. 

The neighbor is a -senior in 
high school, who told fire de- 
partment officials that no one 
was home. 



The fire appeared to start in 
the basement and travel to the 
kitchen. Heavy heat and smoke 
damage was reported through- 
out. 

The American Red Cross was 
notified if assistance was needed. 

In other calls: 



The level of carbon monoxide 
near the door of an oven at a 
home on Camden Ave. was re- 
ported to be 148 parts per million 
on Nov. 1. 

Another reading at a home on 
Lawson generated 200 parts per 
million on Oct. 30. 




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LaIceIancI Newspapers NovemBer 15,1996 






PeopIe News 



In Foeus 



In the Army Now 

Andrew Faltynek has 

joined the United States Army 
under the Delayed Enlistment 
Program at the U.S. Army 
Recruiting Station, Waukegan. 
Faltynek, a 1995 graduate of 
Antioch High School, will report 
to Fort- Jackson, S.C. for military 
basic training on Nov. 20. He is 
the son of Ronald and Chris 



Faltynek of Antioch. 

Serves on Committee 

Jerl Soulak of Antioch, a 
senior at Illinois College, 
Jacksonville, 111.; is serving as a 
member of the homecoming 
committee this fall. Soulak is the 
daughter of Penny Soulak and a 
1993 graduate of Antioch 
Community High School 



-New ArrjvaI 



George John Taylor IV 

A son, Geoge John IV, was born Sept. 21 at Lake Forest Hospital to Kimberly 
and George J. Taylor III of Antioch. Grandparents are Dawn and Neil Larson of 
Lake Villa and Diane and George J, Taylor II of Antioch. Great Grandparents arc 
Frank and Carol Niedermayer of Salem, Wis.; Clarence and Zella Larson of 
Antioch; Roy and Kit Kaufman of Mountain Home, Ark. 

Mel any Alexandra Safranlec 

A daughter, Melany Alexandra was born Oct. 18 at Northern Illinois Medical 
Center to Chris Segcr and Bruce Safranicc of Antioch and McHcnry. She has 
three brothers, Dylan, 2; Andrew, 7; and Steve, 12; and three sisters, Ariyl, 6; 
Hope, 7; and Tabytha, 11. Grandparents are Bill and Judy Davis of Antioch, 
Steve and Helen Safranicc ofMcHenry. 

Courtney Amber Zlebel 

A daughter, Courtney Amber was born Nov. 1 at Lake Forest Hospital to 
Kathy L. and Patrick E. Ziebcl of Antioch. Grandparents are Karen and Ernest 
Toborg Jr. of Mount Prospect, Irmgard and Brian Ziebel of McHcnry. Great 
Grandparents are Lorraine and Edward Ziebel of Island Lake, Adeline Billburg 
of St. Petersburg, Fla. 



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Drug free . . . and proud of it 

All the kindergarten children at Oakland School set red balloons (safe for the environment) free 
in honor of Red Ribbon Week. The balloons were a symbol of staying drug free for their entire 
lives. — Photo by Linda Chapman 



Something's are better left untouched 



Has anyone ever really 
explored the inside of a child's 
backpack? I mean other than the 
passive "glance through" at the end 
of a school day when all the art- 
work, homework and teacher's 
notes are extracted? Has anyone 
ever actually felt adventurous 
enough to take the time to unzip all 
those little pockets placed strategi- 
cally on the front and sides? The 
pockets and crevices that scream, 
"Jam as much junk and nonsense 
items in here as possible." Well, 
after eight weeks of some heavy 
use, it was time to wash the All 
Mighty Back Pack of one very 
grown-up 7 year old. Oh heavens, 
what a surprise. 

When kids are teenagers, it 
would not be wise to attempt such 
an adventurous search — parents do 
not really want to know what all they 
carry in those bags, but young kids 
are still at that innocent age where 
moms do that sort of thing along, 
with holding their hand crossing the 
street and wiping food particles off 
their faces with a thumb and spit. It's 
amazing what little pack rats kids 
can be-oh where, oh where do they 
get that from? 

Here is a list that was compiled 
of the precious "identifiable" items 
that lay before me: loose change, 
(where do they get all that money? 
Is lunch money being hoarded for 



that special Christmas gift from 
Santa's Secret Workshop?); a cou- 
ple of small rocks (defense mecha- 
nism perhaps); a pink paper clip; a 
"Good Job" sticker; a really, really 
nasty Kleenex; a Hot Wheel Car 



JINGLE FROM PRINGLE 




LYNN 


Gel <■> T > 


PRINGLE 




79^6*64 



with no wheels (every girls dream 
car. I figure she must be holding it 
for some terrified young man who 
has not had the courage to confront 
dear old dad with the "I wrecked 
the car" speech); some very wilted 
marigolds that were originally des- 
tined for a certain teacher some- 
time back in August; an unsharp- 
ened, eraser-less pencil, (at last a 
school item, totally unusable, but 
nonetheless a school item); 
crumbs, paper scraps, more 
crumbs, more paper scraps, and a 
marble. 

There is absolutely no clue as 
to what purpose was served by any 
of these items, when confronted 
the very mature child claimed own- 
ership to this particular pile of trea- 
sures. The child simply shrugged 
her shoulders and said it was 



BEST FOOT FORWARD 

FROM THE OFFICE OF 



Antioch Foot Health Center 

Gary J. Guziec, D.P.M. Ltd. 
Gary M. Kazmer, D.RM. 



ORTHOTICS MILEAGE 

Just as gas mileage differs between cars, so too docs the longevity or orthotics, 
especially those or runners. 

Shoe inserts have a common purpose: they arc designed individually to correct 
abnormal foot function, most often a tendency to roll inward, 

Orthotics differ in construction and materials to meet specific objectives. Semi- 
rigid inserts in running shoes generally need replacement sooner than rigid types in 
walking shoes. Soft, compressible inserts require more frequent replacement 
because they flatten with use. 

A runner's speed, running surface and other variables affect the longevity of an 
orthotic, s, 

One very satisfying reason for replacing an orthotic: as foot function improves, 
orthotic design should be modified in accord with the foot's structural readaptalion. 

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"stuff." She was gently informed 
that it had no educational value 
what-so-ever and she, not so gen- 
tly reminded me it was "her" back- 
pack and "her" stuff and "she" 
knew exactly what it was for and 
who it was from. She then pro- 
ceeded to meticulously identify 
each item and its rightful owner or 
purpose-even the rocks. This child 
is the one who cannot remember 
to brush her teeth and comb her 
hair without constant reminders 
every morning, this child recited 
the usefulness of each and every 
item in this heap of junk. Do kids 
do this on purpose? 

Do they wolf down their 
lunches then meet by the fence at 
recess and exchange all this worth- 
less junk back and forth just to 
drive parents nuts? Picture them all 
huddled together, scheming and 
passing items between them to see 
whose parents will blow the 
biggest gasket over the half chewed 
peanut butter sandwich and which 
mom will faint the fastest when she 
pulls out the gruesome remains of 
a headless Beanie Baby. 

After all was said and done, 
there is not one item here of any 
value (except maybe the small 
amount of change) that would not 
find a better home than in the 
garbage. As if this child could read 
my mind, I was told to keep my 
hands off her "stuff' and so I did. 
After all, she is the one who has to 
lug that tiling to and from school 
everyday so, there should not be a 
concern as to what "prized posses- 
sions" it may contain to weigh it 
down. 

From now until the end of the 
school year, a vow has been made 
to remove from the backpack only 
the items which arc admissible. It 
is pretty scary to think what wealth 
of treasures will still be there if the 
bag is left unexplored until next 
June. Think of what "stuff might 
be left behind to grow over the 
summer as the backpack hangs on 
a hook waiting for the next school 
year to begin. With any luck maybe 
the nasty tiling will grow legs and 
be able to walk to school by itself 
next year — now that would make 
mom real happy and really scare 
the bajecbers out of one young 
lady. And so goes another "Jingle 
from Pringle" — don't forget to call 
395-6364. 



* 






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9 




NovmbER 1 5, 1 996 UkElANd Newspapers 



Cultural exchange leads to better understanding 

ALECIUNCE w nf™,.™ ™ .*n Cn -„_, :_' ^ 



ALEC IUNGE 
Staff Reporter 

Antioch Rotarians heard 
about how money in the Rotary 
Foundation help makes friend- 
ships worldwide. 

Visiting the Rotary was Julie 
Johnas of Highland Park. She 
works in the Highland Park 
Library. She went to Norway as 
part of the Group Study 
Exchange. 

She, along with four other 
people, stayed with Norway 
Rotarians for about a month. She 
pointed out some interesting 
facts she uncovered during her 
visit. 

Johnas toured a factory which 
was almost completely automat- 
ed. "It was run by two people." 

She noted Norwegians walk a 



lot. Of course, gas cost $2.50 a gal 
Ion. 

Johnas said the fellowship was 
tremendous. 

"What an opportunity for fel- 

Johnas said there were 

only two TV stations 

which were state- 

, owned. She said they 

did have some of the 

finest American shows 

such as Baywatch, 
Friends, and Seinfeld: 

lowship. We learned a lot about 
their culture and they learned 
more about us," she said. 

Johnas added the Rotary rep- 



resentatives marched in the 
Norwegian Independence Day 
Parade. 

"They saw we were near 
Chicago and wanted to know- 
what it was like," Johnas said. 

Part of her tour was a stop at 
Tronhiem, a city of about 150,000 
which is the second largest city in 
Norway. It will turn a 1000 next year. 

She said some of the buildings 
date back to the 1300s. Some of 
the churches had the pagan 
Viking symbols on top to draw 
the people to church. 

Johnas said there were only 
two TV stations which were state- 
owned. She said they did have 
some of the finest American 
shows such as Baywatch, Friends, 
and Seinfeld. 

She told members she met a 




Concentration 

Curtis Hall of Antioch measures up a shot at the Fall Festival held at the Seventh-day Adventist 
Christian School of Lake County.— Photo by Neal Tucker 



Des Plaines River Trail project gets grant 



Two state grants totaling 
$400,000 were awarded to the 
Lake County Forest Preserves Des 
Plaines River (DPR) Trail project 
by the Illinois D'ept. of Natural 
Resources. The grants were 
announced by Forest Preserve 
president Jim LaBelle at the Nov. 
12, Board of Commissioners 
meeting.A $200,000 grant from 
jthe 1997 Illinois Bike Path Project 
will help fund construction of a 
road underpass on the southern 
section of the DPR Trail at St. 
Mary's Road in Libertyville. The 
Open Space Land Acquisition and 
Development (OSLAD) grant pro- 
gram awarded the Forest Preserve 
a $200,000 grant to help fund con- 
struction of the DPR Trail from 
Washington Street north to Grand 
Avenue, 

The Illinois Dcpt. of Natural 
Resources grant programs are 
part of ongoing efforts to enhance 
outdoor recreation and bike trail 



opportunities statewide. 

The 5,108-acre Des Plaines 
River Greenway, a chain of Forest 
Preserves that stretches from the 
Illinois-Wisconsin state line to 
Cook County, preserves 80 per- 
cent of the river's banks and 
includes two nine mile sections of 
the multi-purpose DPR Trail. A 
focus of Lake County Forest 
Preserve nature preservation and 
restoration efforts, the Greenway 
includes several dedicated Illinois 
Nature Preserves and is also home 
to many endangered and threat- 
ened species of plants and animals. 

The northern section of the 
trail currently runs nine miles 
through Van Patten Woods, 
Wadsworth Savanna, the 
Wetlands Demonstration Project, 
and Gurnee Woods Forest 
Preserves. One additional mile, 
from Rte. 4 1 to Old Grand Avenue, 
is under construction and will be 
open to trail users by the end of 



1996. The southern section cur- 
rently runs nine miles through 
Old School, MacArthur Woods, 
Wright Woods and Half Day 
Forest Preserves. Three additional 
miles, from Route 137 to 
Rockland Road in Libertyville, are 
currently under construction and 
will be open to trail users by the 
end of 1996. 

When the Des Plaines River 
Trail is complete, bridges and 
underpasses will allow trail users 
to wind their way, nonstop for 33 
miles through some of Lake 
County's prime natural areas 
without crossing any major roads. 

A $1.9 million state 
Congestion, Mitigation and Air 
Quality Grant (CMAQ), awarded 
to the Forest Preserve District by 
IDOT in 1993, also will help fund 
the trail connections and reim- 
burse up to 80 percent of project 
costs. The grants will be matched 
with Forest Preserve funds. 



girl from Wisconsin who was 
enjoying the "roose" a 6-8 week 
celebration before you graduate 
high school. 

Johnas said the Norway 



The exchange program is 
going to Thailand this year. 
There is no cost but incidental 
expenses. The team leader must 
be a Rotarian, but others on the 



Rotarians only held evening meet- team don't have to be Rotary 
ings with coffee and desserts. members. 



CaLencIar 



November 1996 






Lakeland, 

Newspapers / 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15 

Footlights 

6 p.m. at St. Peter's Church 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16 



Twelve Days of Christmas open house 

9:30 a.m.-noon at Community Center, 884 
Main St. Historical walk and carriage rides. 

Footlights 

6 p.m. at St. Peter's Church 

SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 1 7 

Shut-in Mass for handicapped 

11a.m. at St. Peter's Church 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18 




Antioch Police and Fire Commission meets 

6 p.m. 

Antioch Coin Club meets 

7 p.m. at Antioch Public Library 

Men's Basketball 

7-10 p.m. at Antioch Evangelical Free Church, babysit- 
ting provided. Call 395-4117 

Antioch Village Board meets 

7:30 p.m. at village hall 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19 

Ladies Bible Study 

9-1 1a.m. at Antioch Evangelical Free Church, 
babysitting provided. Call 395-4717 

Parents Day Out for infants to 5 year olds 

9:30 a.m. -2:30 p.m. at Antioch United 
Methodist Church. Call 395-1259 

Bingo "dobbers only" 

4:30 p.m. at Antioch VFW (starts at 6:45 p.m.) refresh- 
ments available. Call John Kernick, 395-5393 

High School Basketball, full court 

6:30-8:30 p.m. at Antioch Evangelical Free Church 

Weigh Down meets 

7-8:30 p.m. at Antioch Evangelical Free Church. Call 
395-4117 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20 




La Leche League of Chain-O-Lakes meets 

9:30 a.m. for location, call Mary Ann at 265-9054 

Parents Day Out for infants to 5 year olds 

9:30 a.m. -2:30 p.m. at Antioch United Methodist 

Church. Call 395-1259 

TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) meets 

7 p.m. at Holy Family Church, Lake Villa. Call 587-1422 

or 587-5994 ' 



Antioch Park Board meets 

7 p.m. 

THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 21 

Parents Day Out for infants to 5 year olds 
9-30 a.m. -2:30 p.m. at Antioch United 
Methodist Church. Call 395-1259 




TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) meets 

6 p.m. at Antioch Manor Apartments. Call 395-8143 

Overcomers meets 

7 p.m. at Antioch Evangelical Free Church 

Antioch Community High School Board meets 

7:30 p.m. at Lake Villa Elementary District office 



GOT SOMETHING GOING ON? CALL US! 
Ask for Elise Retzinger 223-8161 



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UkElANd Newspapers NovcMbER 1 SF, 1996 



ANNiVERSARy 



Strobel-Johnson 

A recent family reunion and lun- 
cheon at Columbia Bay Restaurant in 
Antioch marked the 55th wedding 
anniverary of Melvin and Dorothy 
(Strobl) Johnson of Antioch. Melvin and 
Dorothy were united in marriage on 
Nov. 8, 1941, and have six children: 
Dennis (Tina) of West Allis, Wis., Robert 
(JoAnn) of Pewaukee, Wis., Michael 
(Leslie) of Mukwanago, Wis., Patricia 
(Mike) of Mission Viego, Cal., Pamela 
(Patrick) of Antioch, and Dean (Debbie) 
ofO'Claire.Wis. 

Melvin and Dorothy have been resi- 
dents of Antioch for over 53 years. 
Melvin is from Abbott Laboratories and 
Dorothy is a homemaker and lifelong 
companion to her best friend, Melvin. 




Lakeland Newcomers plan daytime social 



The Lakeland Newcomer's 
Club will be holding a Daytime 
Social on Nov. 15 from 9:30 to 
11:30 a.m. at St. Mark Lutheran 
Church, Community Room in 
Lindenhurst. Meet new friends 
and neighbors from the north- 
ern Lake County area. Children 
are welcome too. 

The Lakeland Newcomers 



Club has numerous activities 
such as; baby-sitting co-op, 
children's play groups, restau- 
rant hopping groups, bowling 
and many more activities. 

For more information call 
Cathy at 265-6080 or Laureen at 
973-2724. 

The Lakeland Newcomers 
Club is open to all people in the 



Lindenhurst, Lake Villa, Antioch, 
Round Lake, Gurnee and sur- 
rounding areas who are new resi- 
dents to the area. They provide an 
opportunity to become acquainted 
with others in die community. The 
organization provides helpful 
information and an atmosphere of 
friendliness and good will for club 
members. 




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MUNITy 



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Pumpkin decorating winners 

The winners of the 1996 First National Bank-Employee 
Owned Pumpkin Decorating Contest have been 
announced. The contest was open to children kindergarten 
through fifth grade. Prizes were awarded to all entrants. First 
place winners were Nikkole Taylor and Holly Roberts. 
Second place winners were Danielle Rees and Dalton West. 
Third place winners were Justin Weis and Megan Valum. 
Honorable mentions were awarded to Josie Martin, Matt 
Taylor and Dakota West. Above, Matt and Nicole Taylor. 
Below, Dalton and Dakota West. 



Have you changed a little 
since your last 

family portrait? 

First National Bank - 
Now Employee Owned - 
has an invitation for you! 
It's our way of saying 
thank you to old friends 
and introducing ourselves 
to new friends. 

Bring the entire family 
in for your FREE 8" x 10" 
portrait! Take advantage 
of some of our special services and receive a FREE 10" x 13" canvas 
portrait! You may purchase extra portraits in various sizes if you 
wish, but there is no obligation to do so. 

This offer is limited to one free portrait to a family or house- 
hold. Children under 18 must be accompanied by a parent in the 
portrait. 

Portrait dates are November 25, 26, 29, & 30, at both First 
National Bank Locations - Lower Level. 

Call Now As Appointments Arepmited! 



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INovemder 1 ?, 1 996 UkElANd Newspapers 



Mail finally arrives 
some-30 years later 



TINA LYNN SWIECH 



"When I saw the post card, I 
didn't know what to think," 



Staff Reporter 

It's always a nice thing to get a Wayne stated. "It wasn't soiled 

post card from a friend or relative, or anything," he added surpris- 

But receiving it 30-years later is ingly. 
news a little late. Maxine agreed. "It's in very 

That's what happened to a good shape. It's not yellow or 

Round Lake woman. Actually she anything. It isn't even torn," she 

never received the post card from said. 

her second cousins because she Wayne and Maxine are won- 

passed away nearly a month dering if the card hadn't slipped 

before the mail carrier could get it through a crack or was lying 



to her 

"It just showed 
up in our mail- 
stream," said Mike 
Ribbs, supervisor 
of the Round Lake 
Post Office. 

"Where it's been 
for 30 years, I have 
no idea." 

Emma 
Shipley's family is 
saying the same 
thing. "Where was it all this 
time?" asked Shipley's niece 



'It just showed up in 

our mail-stream 

Where it's been for 

30 years, I have no 

idea.' 

Mike Ribbs 



underneath 
something ail this 
time. "It almost 
had to," said 
Wayne. 

What drew the 
postal workers 
attention to it was 
the three cent 
postage stamp. 
"When I first saw 
it, it confused 
me," said the car- 
rier. "First of all, the whole 
address wasn't there. Then when 




Brush your teeth 

Dr. Dennis Hockney, Dr. Susan Mullendore, Linda Pedersen, Deb Kerr and Ted.Axton dance 
their way to bright smiles during the Lip Sync Show at Footlights '96. The show continues this 
weekend. Don't miss it! — Photo by Linda Chapman 



Trustees work to solve subdivision drainage 



Maxine Rittenhouse of Ingleside. I looked at the stamp, I figured it 

Maxine, 78, explained her was the wrong postage for today." 

aunt Emma, 93, died Sept. 18. The Emery said presently post card 

card postmarked April 24, 196- stamps are 20 cents each. 



something (the last digit has been 
obstructed), was delivered to 
Emma's son, Wayne, on Oct. 21. 
While out in his garage work 



The card depicts a photo- 
graph of the Washington 
Monument, in Alexander, 
Virginia. Penned on the back is, 



ing a rummage sale, Wayne was "Spring is early here. The weather 



approached by mail carrier 
Howard Emery. " 'You're related 
to the Shipleys, aren't you?' " he 
asked. " 'Do you know a Hobert 
Shipley?' " 

He answered that he was in 



is as beautiful as ever. Oh for 
more time!" It's signed "Francis 
and Percy B." 

"I would love to call them," 
Wayne said about his cousins 
thrice-removed. While Wayne 



ALECJUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

Antioch trustees and the developer of the 
Woods of Antioch have nearly resolved drainage 
concerns for residents who abut the subdivision. 

The board approved the first two phases of the 
project located on Tiffany Drive south of North 
Avenue, and are working with the developer to 
find a permanent drainage solution. They also are 
interested in having a berm lowered as well. 

"We want to get this done but we only want to 
do this once," said Steve Thelen of KLM develop- 
ment. 

Trustees, two weeks ago, expressed interest in 
lowering the berm as soon as possible. 

Thelen cautioned if he lowered the berm there 
could be flood risks because there is no vegetation 
to slow the flow of rain water. He said most of the 



problems were related to utility lines which left a 
ridge causing standing water. 

According to Mayor Marilyn Shineflug, no 
decision has been made to eliminate the berm or 
not. 

The drainage issues have already been 
reviewed. The village is likely to approve the 
agreement at the next board meeting. , 



SEND COMMUNITY CALENDAR 
INFORMATION TO: 

LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 
c/o ELISE RETZ1NGER 

30 S. WHITNEY ST. 
GRAYSLAKE IL 60030 



fact his father who had passed said he really doesn't remember 

away some time ago. But the post Francis and Percy too well, he 

card was actually addressed to his wants to talk to them to give them 

mother — 'Mrs. Hobert Shipley, the strange news about the late 

Willow, Round Lake.' No street arrival of their post card. He's 

numbers, no zip code, that was all currently in the process of 

it said. searching for their address or 

The postal supervisor said it phone number, 
wasn't easy to find where the card But more than the cousins 

belonged. "It took a little bit of knowing of the card, Wayne said 



work, because we had no num- 
bers to go on," Ribbs cxplr.incd. 
But Wayne, a resident of Round 
Lake, was the right relative. 



his mother would remember that 
time. "Boy I wish she were here. 
My mother had a sharp memo- 
ry," he said. 





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Q Antioch Nows- Re porter Q Lake Villa Record Q Mundoleln News . 

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Maxine Rittenhouse shows a 30-year-old post card that was sent 
to her aunt, Emma Shipley.— Photo by Linda Chapman 




m 



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■ - 

^j UIceIancI Newspapers NovemI>eii 15, 1996 



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From page 1 

is through the courts." 

The complaint alleges the village refuses to enforce an anti-nui- 
sance ordinance against the railroads. They also feel the two railroads' 
practice of blowing their horns at a level of up to 95 decibels measured 
100 feet away, has caused the plaintiffs "irreparable harm." 

"My 3-year-old granddaughter won't even come to visit me," said 
Plaintiff Cecile Kelly. "She says that the trains' horns hurt her ears." 

Village officials refused to enact an anti-whistle blowing ordinance two 
years ago after researching the issue. Village officials claimed they didn't 
have the authority to require the railroad to stop blowing the whistles. 

A key legal contention is what is meant by "excusing" the railroad 
from having to blow the horns for liability reasons. The resident's 
attorney, David Duggan believes excused is the same as requiring the 
railroad not to whistle. 

"We feel we have a legally defensible position," David Duggan said. 

Village officials contend excusing the railroad would put the liabil- 
ity on the village should there be a vehicle train collision. 

State law requires railroads to blow the horns unless "excused by 
the Illinois Commerce Commission. 

"The ICC excused the Wisconsin Central more than three years from 
the requirement that it blow its locomotive horns in Antioch," said James 
Duggan who owns an apartment complex in Main Street. "This was after 
public hearings and findings that there had been no accidents at six grade 
crossings for a period of three years, and that public safety is adequately 
protected by gates and electric flashing signals." 

Presently more than 20 trains a day come through Antioch. About 
10 of them from the hours of 8 p.m. to 6 a.m., according to plaintiff Fay 
McCIaughry who lives at 1223 Main Street. 

"When the trains come blaring their horns, I can't hold a conversa- 
tion with someone three feet away from me or on the telephone. I 
can't hear my television or radio. I'm a prisoner in my own apart- 
ment," she said. 

The complainants hope to get an injunction while they pursue 
relief from the Secretary of Transportation. All crossings require whis- 
tle blowing unless the secretary of transportation deems it not a sig- 
nificant risk of loss of life or where there are adequate safety measures 
already in place. The complainants have until 1998 to get this ruling. 

"...We now have a two-year window of opportunity to present to 
Congress and the Federal Railroad Administration reasons why horn 
blowing should not be permitted in Antioch. Hopefully we'll have the 
injunction in place by then, and we can all get on with our lives without the 
constant racket of trains blowing their horn," James Duggan said. 

Mayor Marilyn Shineflug declined comment until the village 
receives a copy of the suit. 




The fruits of the room 

Footlights '96 is in the middle of its 15th year. Phil Delany, Bruce Adam, Phil Dahl, Ray De 
Martin, John Wolf and Kevin Lyons perform the Macarena in front of a captured audience dur- 
ing the lip sync show. — Photo by Linda Chapman 



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From page 1 

enters the pipes, according to 

Ring. 

The six highway depart- 
ment employees do everything 
themselves. By doing so, they 
save the township a lot of 
money which enables the 
department to stretch tax dol- 
lars further.- 

Ring estimated the cost of 
the project at about $140,000 
including labor costs. It would 
have "cost $240,000 if the work 
was contracted out, he said. 

The finished product 
should last about 20 years. 

"We do the job right the 
first time because we don't 



have the time to get back to it," 
he said. 

Ring said the goal of the 
department to pave all 82 miles 
of township roads. 

Another area which is 
requiring extensive work is the 
Lotus Woods Subdivision. He 
showed where road crews 
removed a bump and actually 
raised the level of the road 
about 10 feet. 

When putting a base course, 
the crew goes over it with their 
equipment to make it more 
solid before it's paved. 

Another trouble spot was in 
the Loon Lakes subdivision 
where the road meandered 



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along the Wisconsin Central 
rail right-of-way. 

Ring said road crews created 
a road and made it straight 
where it had veered off. 

Much of the work is weather 
dependent. Ring said he lost 
months last year because of the 
early winter and the heavy 
spring rains put the department 
almost six months behind 
schedule. 

Department crews are 
working to get as much prepa- 
ration as possible until a con- 
tractor can come in and pave 
the roads. Ring said this week 
he will be calling to get a paving 
schedule. 

rWmTE Usi 

Lakeland Newspapers wants 
to hear news of local sport- 
ing events, clubs, organiza- 
tions, etc. Black and white 
photos are also welcome. 
Please send news items to 
Claudia M. Lenart 30 S. 
Whitney, Grayslake, 60030 
or call 223-8161. 




Come Worship With Us 

A Directory Of Antioch Area Churches 



Qracotand Bapthrt Church. 258 Ida SL, Antioch, IL 
Sunday School 11 a.m., morning Worship 11 am., 
Sunday Evening 7 p.m. Robort Williams, Pastor 

First Church of Christ, Scientist & Roodlng Rm. Rio 
173 and Harden, Antioch, Phone (847) 395-1196. Sunday 
School, Sunday Church Service 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, 
6 p.m. 

Calvary Baptist Church. 654 Parkway. Phone 
(847) 395-3393, Sunday School 10 a.m., Sunday 
Worship 11 am. and 7 p.m. 

SL Ignatius Episcopal. 977 Main si. Phone 

(847) GM'OesZ. Low Mass 7:30 am., High Mass 9:30 

am. Sunday Shcool & Nursery 9:30 a.m. 

Antioch Evangelical Five Church. 42429 N. Tiffany Rd. 
Phono (B47) 395-4117. Sunday School 9;45 a.m., 
Sunday Worship 8:30, 11:00, 6:00, Children's Church 11 
a.m. Nursery bolh services. Awana Club. 

SL Stephen Lutheran Church. Hillside & Rio. 59. 
Phone (847) 395-3359. Sunday Worship. 8, 9:1 5 fl. 
10:30. Church School 9 am. , Sunday. The Rov. Charles 
E. Miller, Pastor. 

Christian Ufa Fellowship Assemblies of Gad Church. 
41625 Doop Lake Rd., Antioch. Phona (847) 395-8572. 
Sunday School ( all ages) 9 am., Sunday morning 
Worship 10 a.m., Children's Church 10 a.m., Sunday 
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m., Wednesday Worship & 
Children's Program 7 a.m., Tuos. Woman's Fellowship & 
BlWo Study 9-11:30 am. Joff Brussaty, Pastor. 



Forth Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main St Phone 
(847) 395-1800. Sunday worship 8 & 10:30 am., Sunday 
School 925 a.m., Mon. 7 p.m. Rev. Darald Qru wi, Rev. 
Gregory Hermanson, Pastors. Christian Day Shcool 
(847) 395-1664. 



Mlllburn Congregational United Church of Christ. 
Grass Lake Rd. at Rte. 45 Phone (847) 356-5237. 
Sunday servlca 10 a.m. Children's program 10 am. Rov. 
Paul R. Motor, Pastor. 



United Methodist Church of Antioch. 848 Main SL 
Phono (847) 395-1259. Worship 8:30 & 10 am.; 
Fellowship Time 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10 am. The 
Rov. Kurt A. Qamlln, Pastor. 

SL Peter's Church. 557 W. Lake SL, Antioch, Phono 
(847) 395-0274. Masses weekdays, 7:15 & 8 a.m., 
Sunday 6:30, 8, 9:30, 11 am. & 12:15 p.m. Saturday 
5:30 p.m. Pastor Rov. Fathor Lawrence Hanloy. 



Chain of Lake* Community Bible Church. 23201 W. 
Grass Lake Rd., Antioch, Phone (B47) 838-0103 Sunday 
Worship 8:15 and 10:45, Sunday School 9:45. Children's 
Church 10:45. Youth, Women's, Awana & Small Group 
ministries. Senior Pastor, Rav. Don Swootfng. 



Good Shepherd Luthem Church (Missouri Synod), 
25100 W. Grand Ave. (Rtw. 59 & 132), Lako Villa 
(647) 356-5158. Sunday Worship 8:15 & 10:45 a.m.; 
Sunday School (3 and up) and Bible Study 9:30 a.m. 
Rov. John Zollmor, Pastor, Christian Preschool. 




Dan Dugenske, Director 
This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 



When you're #1 , you 
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BEAUTIFUL 2^STORY IN TRULY 

MOVE IN CONDITION! 

Vaulted ceilings in family room w/qas log 
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w/ upgraded oak cabinets. Ceiling tans. 
Easy access to additional storage in attic 
over garage. Nice landscaped lot. Close 
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COUNTRY WALK SUB. $149,900 



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COMPLETELY REMODELED 7 BD 
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Very attractive vaulted ceiling with sky- 
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exits to large deck. Full unfinished base- 
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$128,900 



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SpORTS 



Novcmder 15, 1996 UkelANd Newspapers I 



THIS WEEK 




Lightweights/ 
Heavyweights win 
RAGEA15 

HYouth soccer 






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mrIs IceIess HockEy 

5>ee Wee Conference 



JErades 1 & 2 

iBull Division 



|Jets 

gworthstars 

^Penguins 
|B|edwIngs . 
h Flyers . 
"ackhawks 
fns 




W L T PTS 

2 1 5 

2 1 5 

2 10 4 

2 1 4 

2 10.4 

10 4 

3 

3 



ta Division 



^Sharks 
^Cougars 
j|Blues 
|||jabers 
^Epucks 
MMaplclcofs 
" Kings 
Rangers 



W L T PTS 

2 10 4 
2 10 4 
2 10 4 
2 10 4 . 
1113 
1113 
2 1 1 
2 11 



Grades 3 & 4 

Savard Division 

W L T PTS 



Mapleleafs 

Cyclones 

Ducks 

Sabers 

Rangers 

Sharks 

Kings 

Blues ■ 

Cougars 

Devils 



3 

3 

1 2 

1 1 1 

1 11 

1 1 

1 2 

1 1 



6 
6 
4 
3 
3 
3 
2 
1 



3 
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Gretzky Division 



Penguins 

Jets 

Redwings 

Blackhawks 

Flames 

Northstars 

Thunder 

Flyers 

Wolves 

Bruins 



W L T PTS 

3 8 

2 4 

2 10 4 

2 10 4 

1 2 2 



1 2 

1 2 

1 1 

12 



2 
2 
2 
2 



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Wales Conference 
Grades 5 & 6 

Adams Division 

W L T PTS 



Penguins 

Flyers 

Redwings 

Jets 

Blackhawks 

Flames 

Northstars 

Bruins 



1 2 

1 2 

12 

2 1 

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3 

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4 
2 
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Patrick Division 

Sabers 

Rangers 

Ducks 

Mapleleafs 

Cougars 

Sharks 

Blues 

Kings 

Campbell Conference 
Grades? & 8 

Norrls Division 

W L T 




Blackhawks 

Rangers 

Blues 

Sharks 

Bruins 

Kings 

Flames 

Flyers 


























Grant, Antioch girls poised for battle of 'red and white' 



STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter 

Experience will be on the side of both 
Antioch and Grant girls basketball teams 
when the squads tipoff the new season Nov. 
18. 

"With seven seniors on the team, we have 
a lot of players who have knowledge of the 
system we want to use," Grant coach 
Stephanie Romic said. 

Romic calls the Tuesday night clash "the 
battle of the red and white." She has ties to 
both schools - coaching the Bulldogs and 
being an ACHS graduate. 

The experience level is led by Stacie 
Morley, a 5-foot 2-inch guard who this year 
has help at the position. Abbey Newman, also 
5-2 and Katie Owens, 5-7 are back. 

"Newman will be able to help out with 
the ball handling and reading the point," 



Romic said. 

Junior Shelley Beyer and Jessica 
Schenning, Amanda Morman and Lisa Helm 
could combine to take the pressure of 
Michelle Tennyson, a three-year starter. 
Beyer, 5-9, has developed an outside shot to 
go with her rebounding ability. 

"Tennyson is a third year varsity scorer 
and a team leader. She is a good player who 
can make things happen," Romic said. 

"The kids are all trying to find out what 
their roles are and play unselfishly. With the 
first game a week away, we are concerned 
with competitiveness and attitude. We would 
like to see very intense players on the court," 
Romic said. 

The Bulldogs had a 12-win season last 
year . They were just a couple of baskets shy 
of upsetting Lake Zurich in the regional. They 
trailed by two points with less than five min- 



utes left. 

Defensively, Grant plans to mix it up with 
pressure and zones. 

Coach Dave Woods is equally optimistic 
as the Sequoits begin to prepare for the open- 
er vs. Grant. 

"We have some good athletes, but not a 
lot of size. The defense will have to create the 
offense for us. This week starts with shooting 
and getting their basketball legs," Woods 
said. 

The last 45 minutes of practice is devoted 
to defense. 

Carie Gofron and Gina Miller are the 
senior leaders, back for their third year. They 
have seen Antioch hoops go from the base- 
ment to a winning program, 16-11 last year. 

"They are the top two defensive players in 
the North Suburban Conference," Woods 
said. 



SPORTS 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Grapplers ready to defend North Suburban crown 



STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter 

With the experience of four seniors ready 
to show the way, Antioch High appears ready 
to grasp the glory again in North Suburban 
Conference wrestling. 

"Everyone at Antioch is aggressive, 
straight-up, in your face wrestler," ACHS 
coach Ted Seickowski said. 

The Sequoits are defending NSC champs, 
coming off a 15-win dual meet season and 
are ready for that to continue. 

Seniors back for one last hurrah are: Scott 
Grasser at 112 pounds; Bob English at 119; 
defending NSC champ Mike Burian at 140 
and Ted Cizanskas at 189. 

Juniors who will be looked to for large 
contributions include Jeff Ultes, who 
earned second-place regional honors last 
year. 



"He is like many of our wrestlers who put 
in the time over the summer. He won the 
Greco-Freestyle event at the Northern 

'Everyone at Antioch is 

aggressive, straight-up, 

in your face wrestler.' 

Ted Seickowski, 
ACHS coach 



Plaines and was a Prairie State Games 
champ. He wrestled just about every week- 
end," Seickowski said. 

Mike Bardzinski at 125, Joe Brandimore at 
130-135; Dan Werchek at 135; Justin Tripplett 
at heavyweight and Kyle Wisniewski are all 



juniors ready to make headlines. 

Soph Dave Sorokowski at 112 or 119 
could add youth along with classmates Tim 
Taylor at 145-152 and Erik Meyers at 152. 

Junior high wrestling state champ Ryan 
Hlianak of Lake Villa, younger brother of 
Matt Hlianak, is ready to step to the varsity at 
103. Another frosh to watch is Chris 
Vanderkooy at 160 pounds. 

"We have pretty good balance and the 
kids are in pretty good shape," Seickowski, in 
his fourth year, said. "We're chomping at the 
bit to start the year. The conference should 
be a three-way dogfight with Libertyville and 
Lake Forest and you can never count Warren 
out," the coach said. 

Antioch opens at the Barrington tourney 
Nov. 29-30. Wrestling fans should mark Dec. 
6 on the calendar. That is the first early-sea- 
son clash with Libertyville at home. 



Five-game win streak gave football squad much hope 



Five Antioch Sequoits, four of them seniors, were named to the All- 
North Suburban Conference squad. 

Antioch completed a 6-3 season with a memorable 28-25 win over 
Lake Forest in the season finale, a five-game win streak. 

Junior quarterback Dave Gooch joins seniors linebacker Stu 
Johnson, running back Brandon Polheber, lineman Brian Dembinski 
and tight end Dan Wiegel on the all NSC team. 

Polheber, 5 foot, 8 inches, 158 pounds, did not 
start the first two games of the season, a combined 
75-0 loss to Stevenson and Libertyville, but man- 
aged 700 yards. Gooch, 6-3, 177, was a weapon 
passing for 300 yards and rushed for 400 yards. 
Dembinski was a two-year starter on the line. 

"Toward the end of the year, we wanted him to 
run the ball more and we expect to continue that 
next year," ACHS coach Del Pechauer said. 

"Brandon came on strong - he just took off," 
Pechauer said. 

"Stu gave it his all. The kids respected him 
because he plays hard. If you saw someone break 
through the line, it was usually Stu who made the 
tackle," Pechauer said. 

Johnson, 5-9, 170 finished with 55 solo tackles. 

Dembinski, 6-3, 220, is a two-year starter on the 
line. "I will miss those guys. We have to start all over 
now," he said. 

Wiegel, 6-3, 187, is a tight end who used to play 
center. 

Antioch fell to weak seasons by opponents. Wins 
by Mundelein and Warren could have brought the 
Sequoits closer to the playoffs, but those teams won 
a combined four games. 

Juniors back for 1997 include: back-up QB Karl 
Richter; end Jeremy Jones; punter-linebacker 
Reggie Hughes; end Steve Owens; linebacker Robert 
Kiolbase; defensive back Scoit Ryan; linebacker Jeff 
Ultes; defensive back Joe Jordan; linebacker Shane 
Holmes and Josh White; running back Eric Ludden; 
Paul Hammond, lineman; defensive back-running 
back Jeremy Grace; defensive back- running back 
Mike Morrissey; defensive lineman Steve Spencer; 
running back Brian Terrberry; linebacker Rob 



Moore; defensive lineman Joe Goratowski; lineman Eric Vos, Rick 
Kirschenheiter; defensive lineman Joel Orosz, Jeff Gehrke; ; offensive 
lineman Jason Jenisen and Bryan Potter; offensive lineman Kyle 
Wisniewki, Robert Calbrera; end Rhett Mitchell. 

Sophs who gained varsity experience are running back Brandon 
Marchildon and linebacker-running back Dan Pendergast. 










-" 



Junior quarterback Dave Gooch was one of five ACHS players to make the all-NSC 
conference team. Also honored were: Stu Johnson, Brandon Polheber, Dan Weigel, 
Brian Dembrinski and Stu Johnson. — File photo by Steve Young 



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UkEkNd NewspApERS NovEMbtn 15, 1996 



SpORTS 



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LHS swimmers share loop honors, ready for sectional 



Libertyville and Lake Forest shared the spotlight 
at the North Suburban Conference meet. 

The Wildcats gained second at the NSC. swim 
meet Saturday, but shared the crown by virtue of an 
undefeated dual meet season. Meanwhile, 
Stevenson, Mundelein and Warren all had bright 
spots as teams gear up for sectional meets Nov. 16. 

Lake Forest won the meet with 310 points, while 
Libertyville was second with 257.50. Stevenson was 
third at 241, followed by Mundelein with 225; 
Warren had 114.5 and Zion-Benton was last with 
108. 

Mundelein's Jennifer Ocab gave the Mustangs 
some highlights. She was champ in the 200 IM with 
a 2:14.44 effort and second in the 100 backstroke. 

Stevenson's Jill Bergman, one of several talented 
young swimmers, set a meet record in the event with 
a 1:00.05. Other SHS highlights included a two-three 
finish by Jessie Mowrer and Nancy Verdebreke in 
diving. Lissy Goble was third in the 200 IM and Tracy 
Debroucy third in the 500 freestyle. 

"Ochab had a great race in the 200 IM. That was 
the first time she had been beaten in the backstroke. 
The 500 freestyle was our best event. Both had best 
times. We were on the flatter side, but most teams 
were. The biggest task is to get these girls to believe in 




Stevenson's Tracey Dost swims the butterfly leg of the 200 med 
ley relay in the North Suburban Conference in Lincolnshire. 
Sectional meets begin Nov. 16. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 



themselves again," MHS coach Mike Leissner said. 
"Lake Forest killed us in the last dual meet. 

Colleen Haggart was third for Mundelein and Anne 
Wetteland fourth in the 50 freestyle. In the 500 
freestyle, Karen Sliozis was fourth and Brooke 



Konnerth sixth. 

Mundelein was second in the 200 freestyle 
relay. Amanda Wasik, Erin Clark, Haggart and 
Wetteland clocked a 1:44.21. 

"The kids swam well. Our true focus is for 
sectionals next week. But we had personal 
bests from Bethany Yost in the 200 IM and 
Randi Flecher had a solid backstroke (third 
place). Our relays really came through. We are 
poised to have a great meet this week," LHS 
coach Greg Herman said. 

Pinpointing specific meets for good efforts 
has long been the LHS strategy. "You have to 
train kids without regards to dual meet some- 
times. We may rest a day here or there. Our fo- 
cus is the end of the season - conference, sec- 
tional and state." 

The 200 relay of Julia Van Winkle, Lisa 
Pickell, Meghan Michell, and Ellen Kim, 
gained a second place for LHS behind Lake 
Forest. "Those kids really came through 
with a tremendous performance. We have 
been playing with that one all year with different 
combinations together. We picked the four kids 
who we thought would do the best today," Herman 
said. 



Lindenhurst Rockets post fifth shutout 



The Lindenhurst Rockets 
posted their fifth shutout of the 
season with a 1-0 victor)' over 
Mundelein. The victory also gave 
the Rockets sole possession of 
first place in their division. 
Mundelein and Lindenhurst 
played an intense game with each 
team mounting their attacks only 
to be turned back by the other 
team's defense. The game was 
scoreless with six minutes left in 
the game. Katie Lincoln inter- 
cepted a pass from her half back 
position when Mundelein was 
trying l0 clear the ball. Lincoln 
took the shot that passed by the 
Mundelein goalie for the winning 
goal. 

The defensive team of Katie 
Malcolm, Kristen Gagne, Lori 
Knupp, Becky McBrady and Amy 
Shouse once again turned in an 
outstanding performance. The 
defense had to contend with a 
very fast Mundelein offenses, that 
at time, had the Rockets defense 
on the run. Jennifer Michehl 
turned in an excellent perfor- 
mance as goalie for her second 
consecutive shutout. Michehi is 
the Rocket's sole goalie with 
Elizabeth Martin out with an 
injury. 



Other Rockets sharing in the 
victory were Lissa Cobby, Kacie 
Anderson, Melissa DeMeyer, 
Tina Washburn, Callie Check, 
Barbara Leal and Courtney 



Ksioszk. The Rocket's record 
stands at 7-1-1. 

They will be playing their last 
game of the season at Orland 
Park. 



Inspired Patriots thinking 
beyond second round now 



STEVE PETERSON 



Five ACHS players make 
all NSC conference team 

Nine Stevenson seniors capped off their careers with honors 
as all-North Suburban Conference team. 

The Pats breezed through the conference for a 7-0 record 
and another league title, their third straight. 

Senior Pats honored are: running back Kyle Brandt; line- 
backer Adam Butler; running back Steve Clancy; linebacker 
Mike Corcoran; linemen Sean Coughlin and Parker Dodson; 
defensive ends Rache Hill and Brian Novosel and linebacker 
JeffSkibitsky. 

Selected from Antioch, which enjoyed a 6-3 season: senior 
lineman Brian Dembrinski, junior quarterback Dave Gooch; 
senior linebacker Stu Johnson; junior running back Brandon 
Polheber and tight end Dan Wiegel. 

From Libertyville, 6-3 overall: senior linebacker Tim Beshel; 
running back Tyler Coleman; senior quarterback Andy Jensen; 
senior linebacker Steve Krohn; senior lineman Mike Muraski; 
senior defenisive back Adam Waugh. 

Mundelein (1-8): senior tackle-end Terry Beller and senior 
wide receiver Thai Leav. 

Warren (3-6): seniors wide receiver-defensive back Brian 
Falotico; lineman Zack Brandt and Neil Pikulski. 



- I 




Trying To Have A Baby 
Without Success? 

Burlington Clinic and the Medical College of 

Wisconsin invites you to an informal 
seminar discussing: 

"The Work-Up and Treatment of Infertility in the 90's" 

DATE: Wednesday, November 20th, 1996 

TIME: 7 pm to 9 pm 

LOCATION: Memorial Hospital 
252 McHenry Street 
Burlington, WI 
Cafeteria Meeting Room 

Dr. Scott Beatse, OBGYN at The Burlington Clinic, will discuss the infertility 
evaluation, the prevalence of infertility, and first line therapies. 

Dr. Estil Y. Strawn, Reproductive Endocrinologist at The Medical College of 
Wisconsin, will discuss recent advances in Assisted Reproductive Techniques, 

In-Vitro Fertilization, and medications. 

Don't wait! Space is limited for this free, very informative seminar. 
Call today to reserve a space. (414) 763-0350. 



Staff Reporter 

The inspiration Steve Clancy 
finds is a source which is close to 
home. 

"My mother is my biggest in- 
spiration. When the crowd is cheer- 
ing, I can't hear anyone but her. She 
understands the game well," 
Clancy said. 

Clancy and his partner in the 
Stevenson backfield, Kyle Brandt, 
accounted for five touchdowns and 
more than 300 yards rushing as 
Stevenson crushed Wheaton North 
30-14. The win gives the Pats their 
first third round clash after three 
years of being stopped by the dead- 
ly disease of overconfidencc. 

Stevenson takes the 11-0 record 
to Palatine Frcmd for a 1 p.m. clash 
Nov. 16. 

Brandt scored four touch- 
downs, setting die tone with a 30- 
yard scamper early in the game. 
Clancy continued his now-you-see 
me now you don't tricks against 
defensive secondary. Several times 
he put cutback moves on Falcon 
defenders which left them in 
amazement. His longest run was 
for 66 yards. 

"I got the ball and there was a 
six-foot hole in front of me. My first 
touchdown, nobody touched me," 
Brandt said. 

"This feels great. Last year we 
came into the second round on a 
high horse, and lost. The key this 
year is we believe in ourselves," 
Brandt said. 

Brandt's four touchdowns were 
the most he had scored in a single 
game. 

"We tried to balance the run- 
ning backs and the defense played 
great," Stevenson coach Bill Mitz 
said. 

Wheaton North was held to 108 
yards rushing, 225 yards total. 

Jeff Skibitsky led the SHS 
defense with 15 total tackles. Mike 
Corcoran and Jarod Reese had 
eight stops apiece. 

"Skibitsky is a senior and the 
only bad thing about that is we will 
only have him for three more 
games. He had some big-time hits 
out there. The defense swarmed to 
the ball," Mitz said, hopeful the Pats 
can make the Class 6A title game at 



Illinois State University. 

As in die first round win over 
Collinsville, a turnover set the 
home team on their merry way. 
Mike Jaroscak, who would often 
prove that the SHS stadium was a 
Jaroscak Park of sorts, picked off a 
Wheaton pass. Brandt went to 
work, with gains of 15, 5 and 3 yards 
before the 30 yard TD dash with 
8:37 left in the quarter. 

Field position helped the Pats 
throughout. A 31-yard drive ended 
in a 5-yard jaunt by Brandt. 

Jeff Lyons, the Stevenson kick- 
er, added two extra points of his 
four for a 14-0 lead. 

"We felt we could attack them 
and take advantage of it. This is just 
another round - we just have to win 
next week," Mitz said. "I am 
extremely pleased for the kids, 
especially die seniors. We are in the 
final eight." 

Ahead 14-0 at halftime, the Pats 
reloaded for the second half. 
Brandt scored from 23 yards out 
before Clancy rambled from 66 
yards out with enough moves to 
make an NFL highlight film. Brandt 
pounded it in from a mere 2 yards 
away far the final SHS score, with 
3:30 left in the third period. 

Clancy is always quick to praise 
Brandt and that feeling is mutual. 
"Kyle was outstanding. He runs 
rally hard. If he has a good game 
one day, die next game he will be 
marked and 1 will be open," Clancy 
said. 

"We had an excellent week of 
practice. One day we got a little off 
track. Coach Mitz made us start 
over and from that point on, we 
knew we had to focus harder," 
Clancy said. "I visualize before 
every game what I am going to do. I 
visualize myself cutting back and 
getting to the end zone every play. 
Our line did a terrific job all year. 
They took control of the game." 

The Patriots showed just that 
focus for 2 hours and 30 minutes on 
a chilly Friday night. Long about 
9:30 p.m., the entire team sang the 
adopted "Who we are" victory song 
with the devoted fans, a tune which 
may play well in Norma], 

"We're hoping we can play as 
good as we did tonight and hope we 
will win again," Clancy said. 






v 



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ORTS 



NovEMbER 15, 1996 UkdANd Newspapers 




- -^iV- I « 



■Lightweights/Heavyweights win Youth Super Bowl 



The Antioch Lightweight and 

heavyweight Youth Football 

reams were successful in their 

■espective games at the Youth 

tuper Bowl, Nov. 9, against teams 

■rom the Indianapolis, Indiana 

East Side Knights. The 

lightweights made it 41 straight 

|vins with a 28-18 victory and the 

/iking Heavyweights were 26-14 



'Our teams 
represented the 
league we play in — 
the Junior Football 
League of Northern 
Illinois — very well/ 

AlRoth 
Antioch Football 
League president 



winners over the Knights. "Our 
teams represented the league we 
play in — the Junior Football 



out. Scott Hodina kicked the 
extra points and Antioch held a 8- 
Olea'd. 

Midway in the second quar- 
ter, Brian Johnson scored a sec- 
ond Antioch TD on a 26 yard run. 

Neither team could score in 
the third quarter, but early in the 
fourth, Johnson grabbed a fum- 
ble on a Knight punt return and 
raced 55 yards for the teams' 
third TD and his second. Finally, 
QB Ian Lampe connected on a 16 
yard pass play to Kurt 
Kampendahl for their fourth TD 
of the day. Excellent blocking by 
lineman Bryan Hubble, Brian 
Bilski, and Jeff Peterson opened 
large holes for Viking backs to run. 
thru. 

On defense, excellent play by 
defensive ends Pat Swanson and 
Luke Larson forced Indianapolis 
out of their wide running game 
plan as they were forced into the 
middle of the field. 

The Heavyweights closed 
with a 10-1 season mark and 
champions of the JFLNT. The 
Heavies were coached by Al 
Roth — head coach and assistants 



League of Northern Illinois — very Brent Gandolfi and Wayne Santi. 

well," said Antioch Football It was also announced that 

President Al Roth. Antioch Viking League president 

The Viking Heavyweights Al Roth will be stepping down as 

opened scoring early in the first the programs' president, a posi- 

quarter on their second play tion he has served in the past 

when running back Alan four years. Coach Roth did a 

Rapinchuk scored from 16 yards excellent job in leading and run- 

Rockets end season with win 



Lindenhurst Rockers 

(Girls U- 12) 

The Rockers played their 

final two games of the season on 

the road traveling to Rockford to 

Iplay the Rock Run Express and to 

tOakbrook to play the Hinsdale 

lurricanes. 

The Rockers had a tough 
mttle against the Express coming 
faway with a 1-1 tie. After a score- 
less first half, the Rockers took 
| the lead on a goal from Felisha 
Gapinski. Assisting on the goal 
was-Tanya Gapinski and Cheron 
Whiting. However, the Rockers 
could not hold on with the 
Express tying the score later in 
the game. 

Against . the Hinsdale 
Hurricanes, it was all Rockers as 
they easily won by a score of 6-0. 
Erin Jouppi and Lauren Cole 
shared the shut out in goal. 
Knslina Gopp scored first assist- 
ed by Cheron Whiting and Kelly 
O'Connell. Annie Heath and 
Vicky Garrison shared the second 
goal with Kristina Gopp picking 
up the assist. 

The Rockers scored two 
minutes into the second half off a 
goal mouth scramble as Tanya 
Gapinski shot in the loose ball. 
Cheron Whiting scored the next 
two goals, the first was unassisted 
off a goal kick and the second was 
late in the game assisted by Beth 
Fries. Fries scored the final goal 
when Hinsdale pulled up their 
goalie for the attack. Fries took 
control of the ball at the half line 
and scored into an empty net. 

The Rockers defense held 
strong with Stephanie Willding 
and Robyn Mortenson combin- 
ing the sweeper position. The 




Rockers finished the season at 5- 
2-3 good enough for third place 
in the division. 

Lindenhurst Rockets 
(Girls U- 11) 

The Lindenhurst Rockets 
ended their fall season with their 
sixth shutout victory of the sea- 
son over the Orland Park Strikers. 
The final score was 3-0. The 
Rockets controlled the ball most 
of the game allowing only one 
shot on goal by the Strikers. The 
Rockets first goal came late in the 
first half when Courtney Ksioszk 
crossed the ball from the left side 
to -an unattended Lissa Coby. 

Coby received the pass and 
put the ball to the far corner of 
the net for the score. The Rockets 
continued their scoring in the 
second half when Lissa Coby 
connected with Melissa DeMeyer 
for the goal. The 

game's final goal was scored 
when Katie Malcolm passed the 
ball up to Melissa DeMeyer who 
took the shot. 

Lissa Coby was at the goal 
and tapped it in to insure the 
score. The Rockets defensive 
team of Amy Shouse, Becky 
McBrady, Kristen Gagne, Lori 
Knupp once again turned in an 
outstanding performance during 
the shut out. 

The Rockets finished their 
season in first place in their IWSL 
division with a record of 8-1-1. 
Other rocket players turning in 
outstanding performances for the 
game and the season were Callie 
Check, Katie Lincoln, Kacie 
Anderson, Tina Washburn, 
Jennifer Michehl, Barbara Leal 
and Elizabeth Martin, 



Both the Antioch Lightweights and Heavyweights won the Youth Super Bowl this past weekend. — 
File photo by Linda Chapman 



ning the Viking program which lead— a touchdown that iced 

expanded with a ten team flag things for the Vikings. Romano 

football as well as seven traveling totaled 68 yards for the day. 

football teams. Bobby Grasser scored a 

The Viking Lightweights fin- fourth Antioch TD on a 10 yard 

ished with an 11-0 season mark pass from QB Mark Purnell. Extra 

and their 41st straight win. The points were scored by Purnell — 



YMCA offering new swim lessons 

The Lake County Family YMCA is starting a new session for swim- 
ming lessons and are excepting registration. The YMCA offers all types 
of progressive swimming levels for all ages. They also offer Private and 
Semi-Private lessons for those who want more individualize training. If 
you are interested in signing up, call the YMCA at 3G0-YMCA and ask 
for Joe Axne, Aquatics Director. 



team battled the Indianapolis 
East Side Knights and came out 
on top 28-18, Chris Romano 
scored three Antioch TDs — one a 
defensive pick of a Knight player 
in leading Antioch. Romano 
scored on the first play from 
scrimmage on an 18 yard scam- 
per; then added a second TD on a 
54 yard run of a broken play. His 
third TD came late in the game 
with Antioch clinging to a 21-18 



Kicks and Bill Damron on a run. 
Running back Mike Smith was 
the teams' offensive workhorse 
with 169 yards on 14 carries- 
Indianapolis got a three touch- 
down performance from running 
back Dion Moore which had kept 
the Knights right in the game. He 
had scored all three TDs in the 
first half as the Viking defense 
tightened to shut out the Knights 
in the second half. Defensively, 



Smith led with seven tackles with 
Grasser and Chris Richarson five 
tackles each and Romano six 
tackles. Safety Ryan Weigel had 
three key tackles which stopped 
key drives by Indianapolis. 

The Knights fumbled four 
times and Grasser and Romano 
had two fumble recoveries each. 
Jim Huspen, Bill Merker, Mark 
Purnell, Billy Damron, and Matt 
Elliott were other standouts 
defensively for Antioch. The 
Lightweights were coached by 
Denny Porter— head coach and 
assistants Dane Anderson (defen- 
sive coordinator), Fernando 
Lopez (line coach) and John 
Lesniak (offensive coordinator). 




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UkeUiMd Newspapers NovcMbER T5, 1996 



1/ 



Old Mill Creek sewer 
expansion on its way 



ELIZABETH EAKEN 

Staff Reporter 



P, 



erhaps the most 
eminent sign of things to 
come has become a real- 
ity with the approval of 
revenue bonds and the 
awarding of contracts to 
construct a sewer and 
wastewater treatment 
plant in Old Mill Creek. 
It will be able to accom- 
modate the waste of 
10,000 people per day. 
The project is scheduled 
for completion in June 
of 1998. 

The facility to be located east 
of Hunt Club Road and south of 
Mill Creek is the first to be built 
by the county since their largest 
expansion in history with the $30 
million DesPIaines River facility 
in 1993, according to Martin 
Galantha, superintendent of the 
Lake County Public Works 
Department. 

"It's our first new facility in 
quite some time. Overall nine 
and a half mile of sewer will be 
laid," Galantha said. 

Construction of the sewer 
system has been awarded to 
Walsh Construction of Chicago in 
the amount of $13.7 million. 
Semford Contracting Inc. of 
Crestwood has been awarded the 
contract for construction of the 
wastewater treatment facility in 
the amount of $11.5 million. 

The county is financing the 
project through Sll million in 
revenue bonds, already acquired 
assessment fees from properly 
owners in the fl.OOO-acre special 
service area and budget appro- 



priations from the department of 
public works capital fund. 

The special service area 
encompasses the village of Old 
Mill Creek, the vacant Abbott 
property to the north-west of the 
village and a portion of Antioch. 
It will also replace the 
Grandwood Park facility at 
Hutchins Road and Grandwood 
Drive which will be phased out 
and dismantled. 

Galantha said the project 
goes back to the 1960s when the 
county developed a regional plan 
but it was deferred due to lack of 
development in the area. 

He said three things coming 
together at the same time in 1991 
brought it back to the table 
including the development of the 
Old Mill Creek unified develop- 
ment code, Antioch's annexation 
of land west of Route 45 and 
Abbott's purchase of property in 
the area. The new facility will 
have the capacity to treat 1 mil- 
lion gallons of wastewater and 
sewage per day and the capacity 
to accommodate 8 million gal- 
lons per day with expansion. 

Old Mill Creek hasn't issued 
the building permits at this point 
but the project specifics were 
previewed before the village 
board by their Building 
Commissioner Wolf Berthold. 
The village is considering hiring 
an inspector for the project or 
possibly utilizing their engineer- 
ing firm Dames and Moore to 
inspect test results on the pipes. 
They are also considering requir- 
ing a letter of credit refundable 
Upon completion of the project. 

The buildings have been 
designed by the county to resem- 
ble a barn in keeping with the 
rural character of Old Mill Creek, 
but plans are still subject to 
approval of the village board. 




Full of BulL..tickets that is!!! 

The band director of Antioch Upper Grade School, Earl Bush, congratulates Ryan Dussalt, 
Antioch, for a job well done. As part of a fund raiser for the school band, Ryan was the win- 
ner of 4 Bulls tickets. — Photo by Linda Chapman 



Reading in spotlight for Library Week 



Antioch Public Library District 
officials encourage residents to 
stop and see what their library has 
to offer during National Library 
Week (Nov. 18-24). 

The library offers a wide array of 
services including personal com- 
puter use, a computerized card cat- 
alog, children's area, reading sec- 
tion along with computerized refer- 



ence aids. 

The library is sponsoring 
"Children's Book Week." The 
theme is "Be a Readasaurus!" 

"Be a Readasaurus" party will 
be held on Wednesday, Nov. 20, at 
3:30 p.m. . A signer will be available 
to children who need communica- 
tion in sign language. 

Patrons are welcome to check 



out the computerized card catalog. 
See if a book is available at the click 
of a mouse. You can even reserve a 
book from another library through 
an inter-library loan. 

Street finder helps you locate 
where you want to go. It can>pror 
vide a detailed street mapor mo>e' \ 
general one showing the main i 
roads.— by ALECJUNGE I 



-Letters to EcHtor 



1 1 



Driving force 

Editor: 

There have been many articles 
written about the sewer feasibility 
study for Antioch Township. May I 
use this column to thank some of 
the troops behind the two year 
push for this study. They are the 
unsung heroes. 

Bill Liniewicz who left his busi- 
ness to attend every meeting with 
the county. Ms. Nowak and Ms. 
Keating who copied and stuffed 
7,000 blank forms at their own 
expense to make sure everyone was 
notified. Mary Foley who did all the 
secretarial work and all the publici- 
ty on this important issue. 

All of the subdivision repre- 
sentatives who canvassed their 
neighborhoods with petitions, To 
those people, I know 1 speak for all 
of UHAUA in saying thank you for 
being the driving force. 

Carole Jonites 

President UHAUA 

Antioch 

Can't afford 

Editor: 

I have lived in Antioch 
Township for 42 years. I have a sep- 
tic tank system and never had a 
problem with it in all those years. 

I am living on Social Security 
and soon my wife will be on Social 
Security. How in the world can Judy 
Martini and Carol jonites expect us 
to come up with $14,000 to pay for 
sewers, not to mention the month- 
ly charge? 

I would say we are not the only 
people who can't afford sewers. 



But I guess it is the same old 
story. If you do not like it, or can't 
afford it, sell and move and we'll 
get it from the next owners of your 
house. 

When we go to sell our house 
will we get the $14,000 back. I don't 
think so. However our taxes will 
most certainly go up, because we 
have just spent $14,000 on 
improvements. 

I understand there is going to 
be a referendum to create a special 
service area for sewers, so the peo- 
ple can vote on it. 

This kind of reminds me of 
another special service area created 
in the Loon Lakes Area, where I live. 
A few people petitioned the County 
to create special service area eight 
and "Voila" we have the special 
area, no voting at all. Will this be the 
same? We'll see. 

Edmund Roberts 
Antioch 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
Ttio Loon Lakes Management 
Association Annual Meeting will be held 
Thursday, Nov. 21, 199S at the Antioch 
Senior Center, 817 Holbek Drive, Antioch, 
Illinois, 60002 at 7:30 p.m. 

The meeting will consist of the regular 
Business Meeting along with the Bl- 
Annual Election for the following Officers: 
President, Vice-President, Secrelary, 
Treasurer and Two At-Large Directors. 

Anyone residing or owning properly 
within tho boundaries of Special Service 
Area-8 in and around Loon Lakes are 
encouraged to come and cast their voto. 

1096D-36O-AR 

October 25, 1996 

November 1; 1996 

Novembers, 1996 

November 15, 1996 




Christmas; ^aUdcity! 

Lakeland's Newspapers' annual Holidays and Traditions booklets 
are going to press soon! 

Share your Holiday Spirit with Lake County and keep the excite- 
ment going all year long! 

Send us your favorite holiday recipes, crafts, family tradition sto- 
ries, or your most special holiday photographs and become a part of 
these exciting booklets! 

Deadline-for all entries is November 15! 

Send items to Roselle Love, 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers, 

30 S. Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 














■HB^Bnnn^^n 





■ 



■ ■ 



itllll 



- 



"Bravada" 



$j 




-C3- •, ; , - - ■ 



- r ^ss\_ <»t . 







Rebates 
& Discounts 
5^,up to s 3800 

Spirit)! 



i 



'/month* 



jmmfa 



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jh 



"Aurora" 



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Rebates 

& Discounts 

up to $ 4500 



mptitfi* 
NOT A LEASE! 



"Delta 88" 




)/ month*' 
NOT A LEASE! 




B 




^ Clubhouse 

Golf Clubs & Snowboards 

Saratoga Square 

(SE comer of Rt 21 & 

Washington St) 

Hours: M-F 11-7; Sat 10-6 

(847)360-8595 



_7i 




THE ULTIMATE FOOTBALL CONTEST 



•Till 



•ti 



eai in 



§*s Clip along dotted line §*s 



WEEK 13 
Games of Nov. 23 - 24 



16 



15 



14 



13 



12 



11 



10 



8 



EL 



1 



HOW TO PLAY 

Select a winner from each of ihe week's 
games, listed below. Select in descending 
order of your CONFIDENCE in your 
choices. Win points at left for each correct 
selection toward possible total of 1 36 points. 
See complete rules below. You must be at 
least 8 (eight) years old to enter. To enter, 
clip along dotted line, then place game 
entry in POWER POINTS container at co- 
sponsor's retail outlet(s). Entrants must list 
name, address and phone number below. 

LIMIT: You may enter only one coupon 
statewide per week. 

DEADLINE: 2 P.M. THURSDAY 




v96 : OldsSupreme : ; 

r:95,Chevy.Tahoe 

^gBNissanplck-Up' 



^Vas Now : 

s 13,995.- 5 i7: ( '995 
30,595 28,595 . 
.14,995. 12,995 



95. Olds Cutlass. Supreme .15,995 13,995 _ 
.93 Chevy : 3/4Ton p/u 4x4 13,995^ 11,995 



TIEBREAKER 1 








TIEBREAKER 2 





Toial points scored 
(both teams) in 
BEARS game. 

Total offensive yards 
(both teams) in this game. 



I Marquardt 
j Motors 

| Rt 41 & 

j Washington St, 
Gurnee 

1(847)249-1300 
I 



136 TOTAL POINTS 



THIS WEEK'S GAMES 



& 



i 



Name. 



Address . 



[ 



City, Stale (zip). 
Day Phone ( 
Night Phone ( 



Atlanta at Cincinnati 
Dallas at N.Y. Giants 
Detroit at Chicago 
Jacksonville at Baltimore 
N.Y. Jets at Buffalo 
Philadelphia at Arizona 
San Franciso at Washington 
Green Bay at St. Louis 



Carolina at Houston 
Denver at Minnesota 



The 
i Clubhouse 

I (Rt 21 & 

Indianaplois at New England | WasflinEtOfl) 
New Orleans at Tampa Bay , f Smiare 

Oakland at Seattle ■ Saratoga square, 

SanDiego at Kansas City | Gumee 

Wisconsin at Illinois 
Michigan at Ohio Stale *%*** ahax 

I (g47)360-8595 

I 



1 . Object qI the game is lo amass as many of the 
136 possible points as you can Simply review Ihe 
week's schedule ol games, listed on entry form, and 
decide which game you are surest ot picking a winner 
in. Wnle Ihe name olyour ptojeelcd winner on Ihe 16' 
point line. II that team wmsilsgame I bat week, you win 
16 points. Wnle the name ol youi second'Suresl 
winner on the 15'pointline.aridsoondownlolhe 1- 
pomt line, when game you hgure to be a toss-up. 
Next. Ml in Tiebreaker 1, the lolal points scored by 
bolrt teams in Ihe weeks Bears, Rams or Illinois 
game. II (his step (ails lo produce a winner. Ihe judges 
will apply Tiebreaker 2. total olienstve yardage from 
scrimmage in this game. II a winner shll doesn't 
emerge, a drawing will be held among those contes- 
tants still lied. Decisions ol the judges are final The 
weekly winner ol the conlesl will receive Si ,000 

2. Any entry lorm thai does not contain a legible 



POWER POINTS OFFICIAL RULES 

forms wiN be accepted. Enler conlest by dropping entry 
form into POWER POINTS container al participating 
co-sponsors. 

9. Weekly deadline lor entry will be 2 p.m. Thurs- 
days except when nofed otherwise on weekly entry 
lorm. 



94' Olds Ciera 
; 95 Hyundai Gantra 
,;93.Grtevy Blazer: 

,93 Hyundai Eantra 
-^.VAudUQQ. :. 

91:VWJettaGL)- . 

.91 Ford Explorer 

91 Nissan Sentra 

91 Nissan Stanza 

91 Mercury Cougar 

-91 Toyota Tercel 

88 Nissan P/U 

9.1 Ford Ranger 

87 Ford F1 50 

85 Celebrity Wgn 
89. Chrysler Lebaron 

88 Plymouth Sundance 
88 Merc. Tracer Wga, 
84 Caprice Wgn. 



name, address, elc . will he disqualified. 

3. Entries lhal fail to forecast a winner Irom each 
and every game will be disqualified, as will entries 
thai lail lo distinguish between the Jets and Giants ol 
New York and Pitt and Pittsburgh. 

4 . No pomls are awarded onliegamesorlncase 



any game is not played lor any leason during its 
scheduled week 

5. Entering POWE R P0I NTS constitutes permis- 
sion by contestant lor his or her name and photo- 
graph to be used lor news and reasonable promo- 
tional puiposes al no charge. 

6. Employees ol Ihis newspaper and their immedi- 
ale families are ineligible lo participate. 

7. Any inquiry about or protest ol weekly results 
musl be made by Noon on ihe Friday loitowing Ihe 
announcement of winners. 

8. No purchase necessary. Facsimile game entry 



10. Neith er this newspaper nor any co-spon sor will be 
responsible fo r iltegibl a enlry forms or those losl, ste'en 
or damaged in any way. 

1 1 . Umii: one entry per person per week. Each entry 
musl represent the originalwork ol one entrant; 'group - 
entries, 'systems' or other attempts to enter multiple 
entries will be disqualified. Filling out extra lorms and 
putting your Iriends' and relatives' names on ihem 
violates this rule. Any such entries are destroyed prior 
|o grading. 

12. Conleslanls must have reached the age ol eight 
(8) years by Ihe Sunday ol any week's play. 



11,895 .9,895: 
10,995 '8,995 : : 
;1 8,995; 16,995 ij 
'; 9,995. .7,995" 
-* -.9,995 V' 7,995^ 
-9,995 . 7,995 
14,995 12,995 
7,995- 5,995 
8,995 6,995 
7,895 5,895 
■6,995 4,995 
3,995 1,995 
7,795 5,795 
8,995 6,995 
3,995 1.995 
3,995. 1,995 
2,995 995 
3,995 1' t 995'. 
3,995- 1,995 





r — — 



more in 




*$1.000 cash down plus tew, tille, license, 1st payment, sec. dep, S450 acquisition fee 10c per mile extra. 12,000 miles per year Included. 




QUA 







Rt. 41 & WASHINGTON ST. 
GURNEE, 1L 



smobile ■• Volkswagen •.Hyundai (347)249-1300 

^^ W. Mon',-Thur. 9-9; Fri. 9-6; Sat. 9-5 



J 




1 COMMUNITY UkElANd Newspapers Novi-tubER 1?, 1996 




CUSTOM 2 STORY - MALLARD RIDGE 

Hits home has all the features you're looking tor and is close to 
shopping and Ifansportatkin. ' BeHof llian new on a wonderful 
landscaped lot.'' Snuggle up to'thecoiy fireplace in the large first 
.floor 'family room. ,3 bedrooms, : 2-1/2 baths, lull basement and 
much mbre.- Call fora color brochure. '■ . ''■■■ '•_''"'_ 

$199,900 




NEW LISTING - GRAYSLAKE TOWNHOME 
COLLEGE TRAIL 

Much soughi-after Brentwood model Two bediooms, 1-1/2 
baths, 2 car garage, central air,- dining room, fully; applianced ' 
kitchon, at! outside maintenance. A lerrific buyl 

$117,900 



Fox Lake - 3 Bedrooms - Family Room $89,900 
Gurnee - 3 Bedrooms - 120x 120 Lot .$89,900 
Round Lake -3 Car Garage- Pool $82,500 

Waukeqan - 3 Bedrooms - Full Basement $94,900 






W 









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WATERFRONT - CUSTOM HOME 
DUCK LAKE i 

This beautiful brick cuslom ranch is waiting for you, Fish, waier- 
,ski, swim, boat,. snowmobile from your own backyard,: Family 
room with cozy fireplace invites you in Irom your patio, Gourmet 
kitchen tor those special meals, formal dining room, entertain- 
ment sized living' room and much more. Can for color brochure: 

$244,500 



INVESTMENT - 3 FLAT 

MakB the most of your money; invest in this updated 3 flat. Cat! 

,0fdetai,s '.. : . : V; '- : ; $99,900 








LOOKING FOR LAND? HERE ITISIM 

This beautilul updated h ome sits on 92 aaes in Lake Vilsa ■ You II 
M in lovo with the spedaculaf kitchen fully applianced, 4 large 
bedrooms, 21/2 baths, full basement, heated garage, and much 
more. Priced under, bank appraisal and mortgage incentives 
available. So can today fotbrochureahda private showing.. 

$158,900 



GURNEE ... 

] Srwlhridge's finest. 'The beautilul Bedford model is waiting tor 
you, ; 3 bedrooms, 2-5/2 baths, basement; speclacutar , 2 story 
family room with fireplace, toft and much more, aji the amenities: 

-plus a wonderful location close to shopping and transportation. 

W "^ ONLY $223,900 




LINDENHURST'S FINEST 
MILLBURN SCHOOLS 

Entertainment &2ed family room with cozy fireplace, 4 taxge bed- 
rooms, 3 full baths, deck, dining I'room, master suite, vaulted ceil- 
ings, and MHSbOrn Schools make ihis home perfect Call today! / 

$159,900 



1 
M 

1 

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if 



ANTIOCH 

These Are Just Sortie Of The Many Homes We Have Available In Antioch - 
Close To Train, Shopping, Schools, Parks, And All The Conveniences 

Antioch Has To Offer. 



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I AKEFRONT? ALMOSTI 

DEEDED INTEREST IN L AKEFRONT LOT 

ON LAKE CATHERINE 

This unique quad level feaiures 3 .be4rowns,{ family room with 
fleldstooe fireplace, wet bar, dining room, newer kitchen and a 
beautiful double lot plus your own pier on Lake Catherine. Can 
today for your private showing and a full list of amenities. •' 
HH&v:' :: ■"■'•■■'' " $169,900 




' . ■ '^ ; V--'' .:.^:: : ^":">"^- ; -^ :j -"VV>' 



I 

. ■•■'■ 



WATERFRONT;-: 2 HOMES 
LIVE IN ONE, RENT THE OTHER? 

Terrific opportunity to own your own home on the Fox River. Both 
homes have been recently updated complete lo the professional 
landscaping, decks, and hot tubs. Uve across from me peace 
and beauty ol the conservation preserve and enjoy river front fiv- . 
Ing at its best Priced toaell: 

$182,900 FOR BOTH HOMES 





• to 8 a 

W -^'^ • J*?.!!.-.: ,'■• 



r 



NEW LISTING UTOWNHOME 
. . WHEN ONLY THE BEST WILL DO 

This beaulilul 2 bedroom, 1-1/2 bath townhome with full base- 

•:rribnt has all the special touches you're looking for. Custom deck, 

large living room, finished rec room,. 2nd floor laundry, garage 

and more. Offered at; : ""' "i 1 - Li' -^ ' 

$119,500 



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NEW LISTING -CUSTOM HOME ON 
ONE ACRE; ANTIOCH 

All bflgk custom ranch near.Golf Coume.- 3 bedrooms, 3 baths; 
quairy tile kitchen with skylights. Florida room, tarhiny room, 2 
fifepiacos. rec foom, full finished lower tevol, bar, and more. This : 
home has all the features you're looking lor. 

$279,900 




ESTATE LIVING - 1+ ACRE 

Stunning cusic^ home.featuiing 4.. txiclrbpnns.-; 2-:t/iS."balt»,\tuti \ 
basement. Vbull love the gowmel kitchen. with broakfast area, 
•' formal rJirtingrbdrri; 1ai fldoi ;family.room with fireptaca; and cus-v. 
lorn deck and ''pool; All this i and prot9isionally landscaped, tool 
Cat! today. $109,000 



IN TOWN -MAIN STREET - ZONED B-1 
SELLER FINANCING 

A great investment. This cute 2 bedroom' ranch is ■■'offered with 
seller fipano'ng. Backs up lo Williams Park. Think of lha possi- 
bilities.. Only:. 

$119,900 




ANTIOCH -1/2 ACRE 

This Is tho perfect country setting- A cute Cape Cod on 1/2 acre. 
2 bedrooms and a walk-up expandable attic, newer kticnen wilh 
appliances, washer/dryer, all noulral decor. Newer roof and largo 
high crawl tor pterriy of storage. All this and the best lake rights 
. to the chain - through Feller's Subdivision, CalHoday.-^ 

$104,900 







3 bedrooms, 2 baths,' luff bascmsnt, freptaco, 



$127,300 



I 



To Have Your Home Featured Here... Oaf! CAROLYN 




Call For Your FREE • ^©Obligation • Market Evaluation 




ASK FOR (IMS 



. ■wmmmmmm 

OR LEAVE A MESSAGE 24 I 
(847) 395-7900, Ext. 



fc— fc^ 1 ll pl l I, 



9am 



- , ■ ■ 



Come N' Get It! Try these 
mouth watering recipes before 
the holiday crowds arrive! 

, PAGEB16 



ANTfOCH PUBLIC LIBRARY DISTRICT 

7S7N Mai^CtCteifflibM.1, 1996 Ulcetwd Newspapers LAKEHFE | 



^*ȣ55?aai 




Homeowne^^^a 6 ^? Lake- 
Villa's Painted Lakes development- 
Houses by Centex Homes 

PACE B17 




lakeland's Reader Recipes 






Lakeland 

Newpapers 



i~i^._— ».-•-,-, - .-- ■ J - rJt ^ f! 



(i--, ...^.•ti^ 




■ ■ -: -■;'.:....: — iJ .^UiLikSAiU-;* 



^ii£ESiSEi£i 



American Girl phenomenon 
makes history come alive 




n the '60s Barbie was 
the hottest doll around; 
the '80s saw the phe- 
nomenal Cabbage 
Patch dolls. As we get 
ready to enter a new 
icentury, the most popular doll 
for young girls is the American 
Girl doll. 

But the American Girl doll is 
more than just a pretty face. 
This doll is certain to turn out a 
generation of girls well-versed 
in American history.. 

The American Girl is a 
series of dolls and books which 
tell the story of five different 
girls at different periods in 
American history. 

"The books really provide 
the children with an opportu- 
nity to learn about history. 
The books make history 
very real to youngsters. 
They are written at a level 
they can understand," said 
Regina Reynolds, educator 
at the Lake County 
Musuem. "The readers 
find out the 10-year-old 
girls have had many of the 
same concerns and feel- 
ings throughout history." 
Each girl has six books 
which take the reader 
through a year in her life; 

There is Felicity 
Merriman, a colonial girl, 
growing up in Williamsburg, 
Virginia in 1774. 

Kirsten Larson is a pioneer 
girl who journeys to the 
American frontier from Sweden 
in the 1850s. 

Addy Walker escapes slavery 
in the South during the midst of 
the Civil War in 1864. 

Samantha Parkington is 
being raise'd by her grandmoth- 
er in 1904 dealing with a chang- 
ing American society. 

Molly Mclntire deals with 
life on the homefront during 
World War II. Her story is set in 
1944. 

All the girls are 9-years-old 
when the books begin and each 
celebrates their 10th birthday in 
a special story in the series. 

The girls and their stories 
have inspired several activities 
within neighborhoods, schools, 
park districts and at the Lake 
County Museum. 

The Lake County Museum 



auditioned five girls to bring 
the part of Addy to life in a liv- 
ing history presentation which 
is accompanied by activities of 

RHONDA HETRICK BURKE 

Editor in Chief 

her day. The Addys first per- 
formed at Civil War Days at the 
museum in July. 

For the last two -Saturdays 
Addy has hosted a quilting 
party and tea for a group of 

young- 
sters 




years 
and older. 
After hearing Addy tell her story 
about escaping slavery on the 
Underground Railway, the girls 
were taught to sew a quilting 
square. 

India Poole portrayed Addie 
for the tea and quilting party, 
Nov. 8. 

It was her premiere perfor- 
mance as Addy. 

"It's a fun experience," said 
Poole. "I think it's a good expe- 
rience for people who want to 
learn more about the American 
Girls and what it was like to live 
during their time." 

The 10-year-old Gurnee resi- 
dent learned of the tryouts to 
be Addy from a friend at 
church. 

"I put my name in the slot at 



the museum to say I was inter- 
ested in trying out to be Atidy," 
said Poole. "Then we came to 
the museum and they gave me 
some lines to say. There are five 
different "Addie girls" and we 
take turns being Addy." 

Poole said she learned a lot 
about life on the plantation and 
on the run from reading the 
Addy books. 

"She was very brave," said 
Poole. "She really, had hard 
times and learned how to make- 
it through. One of the ways she 
kept her spirit up was to pray 
with the members of her church 
for God to bring her family back 
together again." 

Poole's mother, Sabrina 
Poole, said portraying Addy 
and reading the American 
Girl books has been an 
excellent way for her 
daughter to learn American 
| history. 

"She has really learned 
a lot about life at different 
times in America by read- 
ing the books," said Poole. 
"I think the books and her 
experience with the living 
history have been excel- 
lent." 

Despite portraying 
Addy on the stage, Poole's 
favorite American Girl is 
Samantha, the Victorian aged 
beauty. 

She is the prettiest," said 
Poole. 

Becky Wolff, 9, of Vernon 
Hills came to the quilting and 
tea party dressed in matching 
outfits to her doll, Kristen. 

"My favorite book is 
'Kristen's Surprise,*" said Wolff, 
who has been reading the books 
for the 
last 
two 




Dressed as Addy Walker, a popular fictional American Girl, India 
Poole, 10, of Gurnee helps other fans of the book and doll series 
with a quilting project during an American Girl Quilt and Tea at 
the Lake County Museum in Wauconda. Center, Becky Wolff, 9, 
of Vernon Hills came in a matching outfit with her American Girl 
doll, Kirsten. Below, 10-year-olds Jessica Jacoby of Barrington 
and Cameron Hanses of Barrington Hills have tea with their 
American Girl doll. —Photos by Sandy Bressner 



years. "Her time was very dif- 
ferent. They had no t.v." Wolff 
said she was drawn to Kirsten 
because they looked so much 
alike. 

Hayley Lerner, 9, of 
Mundelein, has been reading 
the books for three years. "I 
think it would have been very 
difficult to live during Addy's 
time because of the Civil War 
and slavery," she said. She likes 
all the dolls and doesn't have a 
favorite. 

Reynolds, educator at the 
Lake County Museum, said she 
had seen other living presen- 
tations and decided to 
bring one to Lake 
County. 

"This was a per- 
fect way to bring 
somen's 
history 



Reynolds. "A child can often 
relate better to another child 
and gain something extra from 

it." 

Reynolds believes the research 
that has went into writing of the 
American Girl books makes 
them a unique learning experi- 
ence. 

She is hoping to bring a sec- 
ond American girl, Molly 
Mclntire from the World War II 
era, to life 
next 
year. 





TOJffFSiq 
LAKE LIFE UkdANd Newspapers NovcMbtR 1 5, ,1,996 



tfy . r- *■* l 



JO! fFtt# HDOtTliA 







-Kids Fare — — — — — — — — 

Kohl Children's Museum welcomes Paddington Bear 



England's own, Paddington 
Bear has hugs and handshakes for 
everyone at Kohl Children's 
Museum Family Fun Evening 
Wednesday, Nov. 20 from 5:30 to 
7:30 p.m. This evening event 
brings families together at a special 
after-hour to explore the museum 
and its many hands-on exhibits 
and activities. 

The entire family can play 
together at a time when the muse- 
um is normally closed, which 
makes for a relaxing, enjoyable 
experience for families. During the 
evening, visitors will enjoy design- 
ing hats or coats, make stuffed ani- 
mals, or write a new Paddington 
Bear story. And don't forget about 



the friendly, furry bear who will be 
making his debut appearance at 
the museum. 

Cost for this special program is 
$7 per member family; $10 per 
non-member family. 

To register for this event, call 
Martha or Joan at 256-6056, ext 
339 or 338. 

Cooking sessions 

Lake Forester Linda Z. Hegg 
will teach a series of cooking ses- 
sions especially for kids ages 8 to 
13 at Gorton Community Center, 
400 E. Illinois Rd., Lake Forest. 
Safety, cleanliness, and nutrition 
will be emphasized. 

"Thanksgiving Treats" will be 



held onThursday,Nbv. 21 from 4 
to 5:30 p.m. with a fee of $12. 
Students will sip their own home- 
made cranberry punch while 
rolling out and decorating "turkey" 
sugar cookies. Pastry cloths, rolling 
pins, cookie cutters and pastry 
bags for decorating will be used. In 
addition, students will impress 
their families with homemade but- 
ter for the mashed potatoes. To 
register, call 234-6060. 

Willy Wonka 

The Papai Players welcomes 
the entire family to share in a deli- 
cious adventure with Willy Wonka 
and the Chocolate Factory. 

A one hour musical delight 



with five performances at Cutting 
Hall in Palatine, 150 E. Wood St., 
Saturday, Nov. 16 at 10 a.m.; 
Wednesday, Nov. 20 at 10 a.m.; 
Wednesday, Dec. 4 at 10 a.m.; and 
Friday, Dec. 13 at 10 a.m. 

One performance at Stevenson 
High School, One Stevenson Dr. in 
Lincolnshire will be held Saturday, 
Nov. 30 at 10:30 am. Advance tick- 
et prices are $5, $6 at the door. For 
tickets call, 359-9556. 

Idea Adventures 

Idea Adventures Children's 
Museum of McHenry County 
announces the first annual 
"Artrageous" art auction/fundrais- 
er. The event will take place at 7:30 



p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, at the; Bull 
Valley Golf Club in Woodstock. 

In addition to the live art auc- 
tion, "original" works of art created 
by local celebrities as well as quali- 
ty gifts donated by local retailers 
will be featured and available via 
silent auction. 

Hors d'oeuvres will be avail- 
able throughout the event Music 
will be provided by the McHenry 
County Youth Orchestra. Dress for 
the affair is black tie optional. 
"Artrageous" tickets are $40 with 
all proceeds benefitting Idea 
Adventures Children's Museum, a 
not for profit organization. 

For tickets call (815)356- 
9985.— by ROSELLE LOVE 



When it comes to kid's behavior problems, together we stand, divided we fail! 



Dear Dr. Singer, 

We keep seeing that you 
have written a book called 
"Why Time Out Doesn't Work." 
We have used Time Out for 
what seems like forever and 
boy It Isn't working for us. The 
behavior stays bad. So, why 
doesn't It work? P.S. 

Dear P.S., 

Boy, what a question! It's has 
stumped many for quite some 
time! I would love to be able to 
answer you completely here, but 
as you know, I've got enough to 
say to have written a book about 
the subject so I'll try the "Readers 
Digest Version" here. 

Time Out is about a lot more 
than putting your child in a chair. 
There are tilings that need to hap- 
pen before, during and after as 
well as a mindset or thought 
process that needs to happen 
throughout. Time out can fail for 
many reasons. We naturally make 
mistakes that we aren't aware of 
that can cause behavior to go 
longer than it should. We feel guilt 
about using discipline. We negoti- 
ate when we should follow a plan. 

There are so many reasons. I 
firmly believe and have tried to 
point out with my book, that we 
have two choices when it comes to 
discipline. The first choice is to 
stick with the status quo, not 
change anything and not get any 
results. 

The second way, even though 
it may be difficult at first, is to 
change what doesn't work, find a 
program that helps build appropri- 
ate discipline skills and stick with it 



until behavior changes. To me the 
choice is clear. We need to teach 
our kids how to make decisions for 
themselves and teach that their 
decisions are ultimately what 
cause their outcomes. ■ 

Many discipline programs 
teach techniques. Techniques are 
important, but also teaching kids 
how to think before they do is also 
important! This book teaches kids 
to do things because it's 
the right decision and 
not because someone 
told them to oris bigger 
than them. We want our 
kids to be critical 
thinkers and be able to 
survive in our world as 
adults. The focus in my 
behavior program and 
book is to help parents 
help their kids to be able to survive 
and thrive as adults with the 
lessons learned in childhood. To 
help behavior change quickly with 
permanent learning. 

Putting them in a chair without 
any plan is really not teaching 
them anything except how to sit in 
a chair and about the power we 
have over them. This doesn't do 
anyone any good. The best thing I 
can tell you is that to get the whole 
picture, you really need to read the 
book. You can order it through the 
number below. Thanks for your 
interest and good luck! 

Dear Dr. Singer, 

First, we really appreciate 
your column. We find it very 
Interesting! My question Is 
about my children's behavior. 
My husband and I don't exactly 
see eye to eye on a lot of disci- 



pline Issues as well as other 
issues. We are not public 
about this In front of our kids, 
but I sometimes wonder If our 
difference In viewpoint might 
be contributing to our kid's 
behavior problems? Can you 
give me some Idea of whether 
you Ve seen this happen before 
or If I'm totally In left field? 
Thanks. R.G. 



PARENT'S 

Place 



Sheni Singer, Psy.D. 

Licensed Clinical Psychologist 



DearR.G., 

You are not in left field, but 
right on base! Most parents I have 
talked with usually have different 
viewpoints about discipline as well 
as other tilings. This is very nor- 
mal. In fact, I run a behavior pro- 



gram, in which, one of the major 
things we focus on is helping par- 
ents to deal with discipline more 
effectively together. 

Since it is one of the most com- 
mon problems with effective disci- 
pline for kids, I figured it might be 
a good idea to fix that first! I have 
found this program to have phe- 
nomenal success rates at changing 
bad behavior in a matter of days 
when parents get togeth- 
er on this. 

Certainly, we don't work 
to change anyone's style, 
just fill them in on a lot of 
logical information that 
tends to naturally bring 
parents together. Unity in 
parents (even divorced 
ones) is extremely impor- 
tant in getting children to 
behave. 

If your biggest problem in see- 
ing eye to eye is on discipline 
issues, the behavior program 
might be appropriate for you. If, 
however, your arguments go 
beyond that and there is a signifi- 
cant amount of stress between you 




WILD! WACKY! JUBILANT! 

-G.n«Sh.llt.TOMX NBC-TV 

BUGS MICHAEL 

BUNNY =^ JORDAN 



and your husband, it is entirely 
possible that, although you don't 
make your differences known to 
your children (which I congratu- 
late you for) , your children may 
still be picking up on the "vibes" 
that are in the house. 

I would strongly suggest that if 
that is happening, you and your 
husband should get some counsel- 
ing for yourselves to deal with that 
stress. Not only can that stress • 
cause increased bad behavior In 
your kids, but can also make life/in 
general, much less happy than it 
could be. Getting help for the 
problem shows strength! 

Dr. Sherri Singer is a Licensed 
Clinical Psychologist, childhood 
behavior specialist and author of 
the book, "WJiy Time Out Doesn't 
Wort" For questions call, (630) 
415-0974 (do not press an ext. 
number.). 



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\ 



\ 




NovtMbER 1 5, 1 996 UkeUNc] Newspapers LAKELIFE 



FY. I . 



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I 

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'Peter Pan* 

Highland Park Players' 9th 
annu^musical production, 
r 'Peter Pan," will be presented 
on Friday and Saturday, Nov. 
rf 15 and 16 at 8 p.m. and 
LU Sunday, Nov. 17 at 2 p.m. 
There will also be a perfor- 
mance on Nov. 16 at 2 p.m. 
The production will take place 
in the Misner Auditorium at 
Central School, 621 Grove St. in 
Glencoe. Tickets are available at Karger 
and West Ridge Center in Highland 
Park and are $10 in advance and $12 at 
the door. Tickets can be ordered by 
calling 205-9188. 

'Really You?' 

Don't miss Laughing Stock 
Theatre's last show of the season, "Is 
The Real You Really You?" The show 
runs Nov. 15, 16, 17, 22 and 23 at 
Andres Steakhouse in Richmond. For 
reservations, call (815)678-2671. 

'Wizard of Oz' 

. , The enchanting musical, "The 
Wizard of Oz" by Baum, Arlen and 
Harburg will "light up the lights" at the 
PM&LTheatre, 877 Main St., Antioch, 
for an extended holiday run. 
Productions dates are Nov. 22, 23, 29, 
30, Dec. 6, 7, 13 and 14 at 8 p.m., and 
Nov. 24, Dec. 1, 8, and 15 at 2:30 p.m. 

Mickey Mandel from Antioch is the 
director, Barbara Judt-Russell from 
Gumcc is musical director, and Linda 
Hachmeistcr from Antioch is assistant 
director and choreographer. 

Reservations are essential and can 
be made by calling 395-3055 or by 
coming directing to the box office start- 
ing Nov. 1 1 . Box office hours are 
Monday through Thursday, 5:30 to 7:30 
p.m., Saturday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 



Magnolias auditions 

Auditions for "Steel Magnolias" are 
set for Nov. 18 and 19 at 7 p.m. at the 
Northbrook Theatre, 3323 Walters Ave., 
Northbrook. Rehearsals begin Nov. 21 
and are Tuesday, Thursday and 
Sunday evenings from 7 to 10 p.m. 
Auditions will consist of cold reading 
from the script. Cast includes six 
women ages 18 to 65. Performances 
begin Jan. 24 and runs through Feb. 15, 
1997 on weekends. There is no pay. 
For further information, call 291-2367. 

'A Woman Called Truth' 

' Stage Two presents "A Woman 
Called Truth," a play about the life of 
Sojurner Truth, by Sandar Fenichel 
Asher. Remaining show dates are Nov. 
15 and 16, Tickets are $6 for general 
public, $5 for students and seniors. . 
Stage Two Theatre is located at 410 
Sheridan Rd., Highwood. For reserva- 
tions, call 432-7469. 

"The Man Who Came to Dinner," 
an extremely popular holiday comedy 
by Kauffman and Hart, will be per- 
formed Nov. 21 through Jan. 4 at Stage 
Two Theatre. 

Iguana auditions 

Bowen Park Theatre Company, a 
professional theatre company located 
at the Jack Benny Center for the Arts in 
Waukegan, will be holding auditions 
for Tennessee Williams' "The Night of 
the Iguana." Artistic Director Maura 
Elizabeth Manning is looking for six 
women age 25 to 55, and eight men age 
25 to 70. Auditions are by appointment 
Saturday, Nov. 16 from 1 to 5 p.m., and 
Sunday, Nov. 17 from 1 to 5 p.m. Walk- 
Actors must prepare two contrasting 
monologues no more than two min- 
utes apiece. There will also be readings 
from the script. For further informa- 



tion, or to make an appointment, call . 
360-4741. 

No Exist' 

Jean-Paul Sartre's "No Exit," the fall 
theatre production of the College of 
Lakp County, will be performed Nov. 15 
and 16, in the auditorium, 19351 W. 
Washington St., Grayslake. 

"No Exit" is a gripping drama with a 
focus on character development. The 
drama unfolds when a group of people 
find themselves in a room together and 
confront each other about the choices 
they have made in their lives. The play 
is directed by CLC English instructor 
Eibhlin Glennon. Tickets are $7 general 
admission and $5 for CLC students and 
alumni. For tickets, call 223-6601, ext. 
2300. 

'Nutcracker 1 

. The Barrington Youth Dance 
Ensemble will perform "The 
Nutcracker" at Barrington High 
School's Richard C. Johnson 
Auditorium on Friday, Dec. 6 at 7:30 
p.m., Saturday, Dec. 7 at 2 and 7:30 
p.m.; and Sunday, Dec. 8 1 2 p.m. 
Advance tickets are $15 for children, 
students, senior citizens, and S17 for 
adults. Tickets at the door are $18. For 
ticket information, call 382-6333. . 

Auditions 

Woodstock Musical Theatre 
Company announces open auditions 
for "Pump Boys and Dinettes." 
Performances run weekends Jan. 31 
through Feb. 23, at the Woodstock 
Opera House. Director Diane McFarlin 
will cast four men and two women's, 
stage ages 18 to 40. Bring sheet music 
in.your key to sing a country or folk 
song and wear clothing you can 
move/dance in. Also reading from the 



script will be done at the auditions. 
Auditions will be held Monday, Nov. 18 
and Tuesday, Nov. 19, from 7 to 9:30 
p.m. at the Woodstock Opera House 
(use side entrance), 121 VariBuren St, 
Woodstock. For more information 
contact McFarlin at (414)877-4432 or 
Vocal Director Virginia Zaymonas at 
9815)337-4757. 

'The Mouse Trap' 

The Cuneo Museum and Gardens, 
1350 N. Milwaukee Ave. in Vernon 
Hills and Northstage Theatre will pre- 
sent Agatha Christie's "The 
■ Mousetrap" in the Great Hall of the 
. museum, Thursday through Sunday 
evenings, now through Nov. 17, t 
Curtain rime is 8 p.m. Admission is $15 
and $12. A dinner package is offered. 
Call 362-3042 for reservations and 
information. 

'Singm'iiitheRain' 

Marriott's Lincolnshire Theatre 
presents "Singm 1 in the Rain.' 
Performances continue through Jan. 
19, 1997. Performance schedule Is 
Wednesdays at 2 and 8 p.m.; 
Thursdays at 8 p.m.; Fridays at 8 p.m.; 
Saturdays at 5:30 and 9 p.m.; and 
Sundays at 2:30 and 7 p.m. Tickets to 
all performances are $33, senior and 
student discounts available. For further 
ticket information, call 634-0200. 



NW Symphony 

The Northwest Symphony 
Orchestra will celebrate its 
45th Anniversary Season with a 
special series of concerts. The 
season opens on Nov. 17 at 
3:30 p.m. in the Maine West 
High School Theatre, located 
at the comer of Oakton and 
Wolf Streets in Des Plaines, 




with a performance by noted Chicago 
violinist, Rachel Barton. This "all 
Brahms" concert features Barton per- 
forming the Violin Concerto, and the 
Symphony No, 1. Season ticket prices 
are S3 5 for adults, $25 for students and 
seniors. Children under 14 are admit- . - 
ted free with an adult Individual con- 
cert tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for 
students and seniors. Tickets or season 
brochures can be obtained by calling 
317-9343. 

Major Hall 

Seniors can enjoy a lively day of 
polka music and dancing through the 
Waukegan Park District's Trip Hit 
Parade outing to Major Hall in Chicago. 

The park district asks older adults 
ages 55 and up to mark Tuesday, Nov. 
26 on their calendars. A recreation van 
will pick up travelers at Belevidere 
Recreation Center, 412 S. Lewis Ave., at 
8:30 a.m. and return approximately at 
2:30 p.m. There is a fee of $11 for 
Waukegan Park DisL residents and $12 
for non-residents. The fee includes 
transportation and admission. All trip- 
goers are responsible for purchasing 
their own lunches at Major Hill. For 
reservations, call 360-4700 by Nov. 19. 

Brass band conceit 

The North American Champion 
Illinois Brass Band announces its fall 
concert series. Works by Bizet, Rimsky- 
Korsakov, Lalo, Langford, MacCunn, 
Gregson, and Glen Miller will be fea- 
tured. Great music by a great British 
styler brass band. The next concert will 
be on Sunday, Nov. 17 at 3 p.m. at First 
Presbyterian Church, West Maple and 
Douglas Avenue In Libertyville. For fur- 
ther information, call Bob Schmelzer at 
395-6729 or David Oakley at 362-1463. 
See FYI page B4 




Santa Arrives Saturday, November 16. 

Lakehurst Mall 






xzxaaanuaBmmaexmsptftm 



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fn-tf 



LAKELIFE UkElANd Newspapers November 15, 1996 



Festival of Trees leads in to fun-filed holiday 

Thousands of people throughout Lake County 
will mark the beginning of the holiday season at 
the Fifth Annual Festival of Trees, sponsored by 
the- Victory Hospital Foundation, The festive four- 
day event will be held from Thursday, Nov. 21 
through Sunday, Nov. 24, at Midlane Country 
Club, 4555 Yorkhouse Rd., Wadsworth. 

"Anyone who loves the holidays and 
enjoys mingling with their neighbors 
from around the county will find 
something to intrigue them at this 
year's Festival of Trees," says 
Maureen Kennedy Sivia, festival 
co-chairman. 

To start the festival off right, 
Thursday, Nov. 21, is designated 
as Corporate/Family Day. That 
means all children ages 12 and under have free 
entrance to the Festival of Trees when accompa- 
nied by an adult. In addition, many area busi- 
nesses have helped to sponsor the event by 
arranging for their employees and family mem- 
bers to receive free entry to the festival on that 
day. 

On Thursday, as well as all the days of the fes- 
tival, visitors will see dozens of designer decorat- 
ed holiday trees. Most are alight with hundreds of 
tiny lights and filled with an array of dazzling dec- 
orations. Trees vary, depending on the interests 
of the artists who create them. They range from 




traditional to elegant to whimsical. Festival goers 
who find a tree they can't live without, might be 
taking it home with them. Trees are available for 
viewing and sale. In additions, many are open to . 
raffle, for $1 per ticket. 

The artificial trees were donated 
by area merchants and organiza- 
tions. Skilled designers and craftsmen 
donated their talents to create the 
delightful visions that will stay with 
festival attendees throughout the holiday 
season. 
Talented performers from around Lake 
County will take to the Abbott Entertainment 
Stage to provide continuous entertainment 
throughout the festival. Dancers, musicians, 
singers, choral groups, choirs, actors, will be on 
hand to amuse the audience. 

General admission to the Festival of Trees is 
$3 for adults, $2 for senior .citizens and $1.50 for 
children. Hours are from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Nov. 
21, 22 and 23, and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 24. 
Proceeds from the festival will benefit Victory 
Memorial Hospital's cardiac services, from emer- 
gency care to diagnostics and treatments to reha- 
bilitation services. Providing patient education 
materials, technology updating and maintenance 
and consistent staff and service are a few of the 
ways the money raised by the festival will be 
used. 





Condell Talks 



Dialogue With The Doctors - 

Free Community Health Education Programs 



The "Dialogue With The Doctors" series of free community programs are 
held in the Community Room of our Condell Medical Building, 6440 Grand 
Ave. at Hunt Club &d., Gurnee. 

Mondays 

Nov. 4 "9 Out of 10 Don't!" 

7:30 - 9:30pm Camela M. Harris, MD, Obstetrician/Gynecologist, will discuss 
breast cancer: its prevalence and prevention. Dr. Harris, associated 
with the Women's Healthcare Group, is a Junior Fellow, American 
College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. She is also a Clinical 
Instructor at Chicago Medical School,and a Junior Fellow of the 
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. 

Nov. 18 "Let's Talk About Women's Health!" 

7:30 - 9:30pm James L. Milam, MD, Obstetrician/Gynecologist of the Women's 
Healthcare Group, will present issues of women's health and 
wellness through the life stages of puberty, adolescence and young 
adulthood. He is a Diplomate, American Board of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology; a Fellow of the American College of Obstetricians 
and Gynecologists; and a Clinical Assistant Professor at Chicago 
Medical School. 

Nov. 25 "Menopause and Beyond" 

7:30 - 9:30pm James L. Milam, MD, Obstetrician/Gynecologist will continue his 
discussion of the health issues associated with women's life 
passages: menopause and post-menopausal. 

All lectures are free. If you can join us, please call for 
reservations at CondelVs Medical Center Health Institute: (847) 
362-2905, ext 5770. 



<Q> Condell Medical Center 

Libertyville, Dlinois 

Lake County's Health Care Network 

Condell Acute Care Centers arc affiliated with Condell Medical Center 



Baby Brigade starts new group 

The Baby Brigade, an intergenerational play group for parents, babies and 
toddlers, is starting a new group at the Wealshire, an Alzheimer's Care facility. 
Baby Brigade offers an opportunity to bring joy to a wonderful group of ge'rB 1 
tie, caring older adults, and meet odier parents from the community. Baby 
Brigade visits are die first and Uilrd Tuesday of every month beginning nov. 
19. The Wealshire is located at 150 Jamestown Ln. in Lincolnshire. Baby 
Brigade is a program of Jane Addams Hull House Assn. For more informa- 
tion, call (730)561-3500. 

Mickey and Minnie Mouse come to town 

In a rare U.S. appearance, the married couple of Wayne Ailwirie and Russi 
Taylor, the voices behind Disney's most famous couple, Mickey and Minnie 
Mouse will open the Stay Tooned Animation Gallery's exhibit entitled "The 
Art of Mickey and Minnie Mouse" on Saturday, Nov. 16. They will meet with' ■',' 
guests from 1 to 4 p.m. The exhibit.will nin from Nov. 16 through Dec. 31. 
The exhibit is die largest framed .show of original artworks of Mickey and / 
Minnie Mouse. Over 100 pieces of original artworks will be on display. The" 
gallery is located at 200 Applebee SL, Barrington. For further information, call 
382-2357. 

Festivale Faiitastique arrives Nov. 16 

The colorful excitement of a medieval town festival will be recreated at 
"Festivale Fan tastique," die College of Lake County FoundaUon's 1996 schol- 
arship dinner-auction set for Saturday, Nov. 16. The black-tie optional fund- 
raising event will begin at 6 p.m. at Trustmark Insurance Co., 400 Field Dr., I < 
Lake Forest Proceeds will benefit the FoundaUon scholarship fund. Strolling ., 
medieval players will entertain guests as they sample a fine assortment of 
hors d'oeuvres and enjoy an open bar. After a lavish gourmet feast, guest wiD 
indulge their fantasies bidding on hundreds of live and silent auction items. A 
raffle drawing at the conclusion of the event will send some lucky, winners 
home widi several exciting prizes. Tickets to the festival are $150 per person, 
Far complete information, call 223-6601, ext. 2488. 



ii ' 



FYI 



From page B3 

Concert in Waukegan 

Organist Aram Basmadjian will pre- 
sent a concert on his four-manual Allen 
touring organ at Waukegan High 
School auditorium on Nov. 16 at 8 p.m. 
Sponsored by Lake County 
Community Concert Assn. as the sec- 
ond in its current five-concert scries, 
the event is open to subscribers at S35 
for adults, $15 for students, and $90 for 
families. Subscriptions can be purchas- 
es at die door or by calling Donna 
Fortney at 244-7465. 

YMCA craft fair 

The YMCA Preschool, locat- 
ed on Munn Road in 
Lindcnhurst, will be holding a 
craft fair on Sunday, Nov. 17 
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. A bake 
sale will also accompany die 
fair. For information, call 356- 
0075. 

Holiday crafts 

< Anticipate holiday needs by 
visiting the Suburban Fine 
Arts Center Holiday Sale. The 
Gallery will feature dozens of artists 
with dieir crafts including ceramics, 
jewelry, glass, books, fabrics, statues, 
and toys. The show will be held on 
Thursday, Nov. 14, Friday, Nov. 15, and 
Saturday, Nov, 16. Show hours arc 9 



a.m. to 5 p.m. The Gallery is located at 
1913 Sheridan Rd. in Highland Park. 
For further information, call 432-1888. 





Turkey Trot 

Buoys and Bells Square 
Dance Club is sponsoring a 
Turkey Trot (student dance) on 
Friday, Nov. 15 at First United 
Methodist Church, 128 N. 
Ulica St., Waukegan. Plus 
workshop will be held from 8 
to 8:30 p.m.; main stream and 
round dancing from 8:30 to 
10:30 and plus tip at 10:30 pm. 
Cost is $3.50. per person. For 

further information, call 662- 
6546. 

'1.1 It 

Lake Proinenaders 

The Lake Promenaders Square 
Dance Club is having a dance on 
Saturday, Nov. 16 at Oak Grove School 
on 1700 S. O'Plaine Rd., Libcrtyyille. 
Joyce and George Kammcrer will be 
calling rounds at 7:45 pm. and HErb 
Ocsterle will be calling plus level 
squares at 8:15 p.m. For further infor- 
mation, call 623-6086: 

Walk N Dodgers 

Walk N'Dodgers Square Dance 
Club is having a dance on Sunday, Nov. 
17 at Viking Park Center, 4374 Old 
Grand Ave, Gurnee at 6:30 p.m. Call 
336-0959 for details. 








m 

Ninth Annual ^ 

Holiday Art & Craft Faire 

Village of Island Lake 
Recreation Advisory Board 

Friday, November 22, 1996 
11 am to 6 pm 

Saturday, November 23, 1996 

9 am to 4 pm 

Island Lake Village Mail 
3720 Greenleaf Avenue 
[3> Island Lake, Illinois 

(Four blocks north of Route 176) 

$1 Admission 

(Raffle Ticket Included) 

Unique Quality 
Handcrafted Gift Items 

Raffle for Handcrafted Items 

(Proceeds Benefit the Recreation Program - 
Village of Island Lake) 

Food/Rcfreshments/Bake Sale 








m. 
If 



I^NgPirb 




LAKELIFE UkElANd Newspapers NovtMbtR 15, 1996 



Donna doesn't live here anymore 




If you have ever gone through 
the experience of selling your 
home, then you know just what an 
ordeal it can be. Your life begins to 
eharig&frpm.the moment the deci- 
sion to sell is made. 

To begin with, you risk losing 
50 percent of 
your friends. 
You may not 
be aware of 
this, but 50 
percent of all 
people in 
the United 
States are real estate agents or bro- 
kers. Really! I know this because 
when we decided to put our previ- 
ous home on the market, we dis- 
covered that four out of eight of 
our close friends sold real estate. 
Which was not a problem, except 
to the three we didn't choose. 

This time around, it was easier, 
since we now have only five friends 
left, with only one in real estate. At 
least the odds improve with each 
sale. 

Once you've chosen your 
agent, you must decide on a price 
for your home. Even this can be 
traumatic, since the selling price 
will usually fall somewhere 
between the $1,000,000 you think 
it's worth and the reality that, 
while your home may be your cas- 
tle, to everybody else it's just your 
average three bedroom ranch with 
cheap carpeting. A good agent will 
gently help you to see that reality 



-REUNiONS 



Taylor Reunion Services, 
1(800)677-7800 is looking for the 
following classmates: 

• NUes North High School 
Class of 1986 is looking for their 
10 year class reunion to bo held 
Friday, Nov. 29 at Bub Glty In 
Chicago. 

• Deerfield High School 
Class of 1986 is looking for 
alumni for their 10 year class 
reunion to be held Friday, Nov. 
29 at Rock Bottom Brewery in 
Chicago. 

• Highland Park High 
School Class of 1986 is looking 
for alumni for the 10 year class 
reunion to be held Nov. 30 at 
Rock Bottom Brewery in 
Chicago. 

• Zion-Benton High School 
Class of 1987 is looking for 
alumni for their 10 year class 
reunion to be held in 1997. 

• Libertyville High School 
Class of 1987 is looking for 
alumni for their 10 year class 
reunion to be held June 7, 1997 
at Bub City in Chicago. 

• Deerfield High School 
Class of 1977 is looking for 
alumni for their 20 year reunion 
to be held June 28 at the Hyatt 
Deerfield. 

• Adlai E. Stevenson High 
School Class of 1987 10 year 
reunion being set for 
Homecoming Weekend in 1997. 

| Quit Smoking 
In 60 Minutes 

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information 

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James R. Baker 

Certified 
Hypnotherapist 



("Give me a break, Ralph— no one 
is going to believe that your master 
bathroom is being haunted by 
Elvis!"). 

With those decisions behind 
you, the physical work begins — 
getting the house ready for the 

buying public 
to view. 
Personally, I 
found that 
there can be a 
great deal of 
satisfaction 
gained in this 
step of the process, especially 
when your husband begins to 
work on that "honey-do" list, the 
one on which he had written "next 
week" back in 1992. 

When the fixing-up is complet- 
ed and the walls are sporting a 
fresh coat of cheap paint, your 
house is almost ready for the open 
market. This is the point where 
those "how to sell your house" arti- 
cles suggest that you remove all 
visible signs that you actually live 
there. For instance, home buyers 
do not want to see your framed 
family photos scattered about the 
house. I assume this means they 
would rather see someone better 
looking, so just remove your own 
pictures and leave those paper 
photos of attractive strangers that 
came with the frame. 

This trick can also come in 
handy when, despite the fact that 
you insisted the real estate office 
give you 24-hours notice before a 
showing, they still insist on calling 
you and asking if they can show 
the house in the next 15 minutes 
because the buyers are from out of 



town. (By the way, I have discov- 
ered that all buyers are from out of 
town, since every time the real 
estate office calls me at the last 
minute, that's what they say). 
Anyway, since it's impossible to get 
the house clean in 15 minutes, I 
feel a little better knowing that the 
people who looked at my messy 
house at least think I'm that gor- 
geous brunette in the paper pic- 
ture on the coffee table. (Her name 
is Valerie. Donna doesn't live here 
anymore). 

Finally, whether it's two weeks 
or six months, the moment of truth 
will come. Someone will make an 
offer on your house. This is per- 
haps the most stressful time of all, 
since they usually begin with an 
offer quite a bit lower than the 
$1,000,000 you were imagining. 
Then you counter-offer, coming 
way down in price (about $5), after 
which they counter-counter-offer, 
raising their original offer by $2 
while insisting you include all of 
your furniture and your first-bom 
child. 

This is where I had to be firm. 
There was no way they were get- 
ting my first-bom child. Heck, he's 
20 years old and already raised. We 
made one final counter-counter- 
counter-offer. We agreed to every- 
thing, except for the child part. It 
would have to be our last-bom 
child. The toddler, or nothing. 

Can you believe the deal fell 
through? Not only that, but our 
agent insisted that we don't 
include our toddler in future deals, 
under any circumstances. 

Something about seller disclo- 
sure laws, I think he said. 




CADA means 



GREAT GUNS! 



NOW IN VILLA PARKiThe Midwest's finest show 
of quality collectible and sporting arms, accessories 

Saturday, November 16, 9 AM-5 PM & Sunday, November 17, 9 AM-2 PM 

ODEUM SPORTS i EXPO CENTER, Villa Park 

Just north of North Ave., (Rte 64) on villa Ave., just west of Rte 83 

Admission $5; childrenunder 12 free when accompanied by an adult 

COLLECTOR ARMS DEALERS ASSOC. (815) 259-5445 



A Very Big Public Collector Car Auction & Expo 
Fri. & Sat. • Nov. 15 & 16 




Looking for lomelhing j linle dirr'ercm ta do! 
Come to our Arlinglon 100 public collector 
ear auction at Arlington lnternjlion.il 
Rjcccourw, Arlington Height* on Saturday, 
November 16. 100 irucHment grade collector 
car* will be sold. Ferrari, Corvette*, 
j Mercede*. Claities. Muvcle Cars. Antiques. 
Packard*. Auburm, Ihe unusual, the rate, the 
unique. Preview open to the publtt Friday 1-9 
PM. 5alutday until 3:3Q- Auction 6 PM 
Saturday. Advance sale catalog available. 
Complete descriptions and pnotos of cars 
with estimated prices. Call J00--168-6999 
MECUM AuCTtON, INC. • Mlf*ns o > II. 



Princeton 



ILLINOIS 



"Come Home for the Holidays" 

NOVEMBER 23 

Lighting Display • Community Carol Sing 

• Old Time Trolley Rides 

• Holiday Shopping Entertainment 

NOVEMBER 24 

Holidav Shopping ■ Visit from Santa 

Horsc-drawn'Corriage Rides • Chestnut Roasting 

Old-Time Trolley Rides • Entertainment • Live Nativity 

Most Jtorcs will be open noon - 4:00 P.M. beginning December 1st 




with evening hours until 8:00 P.M. beginning D 
Call your favorite store for their specific 



December 9th. 
hours 




Pnnceion Chamber of Commerce • Prouty Building • 435 South Main Street 
Princeton, Illinois 61356 • (815)875-2616 






USIC 

by RoseIIe Love 
Friday, Navi 15 

Dave Barret Band (Rock) will be performing at Durty Nellies, 55 
N. Bothweli, Palatine for a 10 p.m. show; There is a $3 cover charge. 
Call 358-9150 for further information. 

Duke O'Briens, 110 N. Main St, Crystal Lake will be host to The . 
Prowlers (Rock) for a 10 p.m. show. Cover is $3. Call (815)356-9980 
for further information. 

Appearing at Slice of Chicago, 36 S; Northwest Hwy., Palatine will 
be Pete Special Band (Blues, Rock). Cover is $5. Call 991-2150." 

Performing at Chicago Blue Note, 1550 N. Rand Rd„ Palatine will 
be World Class Noise (Rhythm and Blues). Cover is $6. Call 776- 
9850. 

Saturday, Nov. 16 

Koko Taylor and Her Blues Machine (Queen of the Blues) will 
be playing at Chicago Blue Note. Cover is $10. Call 776-9850, 

Slice of Chicago will be host to Sam Cockrell and Powerhouse 

(Power Blues). Cover is $5. Call 991-2150. 

Coin (Rock) will be performing at Duke O'Briens. Cover is $1 for 
the 9 p.m. show. Call (815)356-9980. 

Durty Nellies will host Trick Flower (Rock) for the 10 p.m. show 
there will be a $3 cover charge. Call 358-9150. 

Sunday, Nov. 17 

Whltey ODay (Folk) will be appearing at Durty Nellies for a 9 
p.m. show. No cover. Call 358-9150. On Thursday, Nov. 21 at Durty 
Nellies will be 7th Heaven (Rock) for a 9 p.m. show. 

PaynefuUy Blues Jam (Blues) will be playing at Duke O'Briens 
on Thursday, Nov. 21 for a 9 p.m. show. Call (815)356-9980. 

Slice of Chicago will host Pistol Pete and the Professionals 
(Lightning Blues Guitar) on Friday, Nov. 22 and Saturday, Nov. 23 
enjoy Tom Carey Band (Rock, Blues). 

Dance to swing, jazz and blues on Sundays at the Chicago Blue 
Note. Sunday, Nov. 17 "Smoker Party" with music by Joel Spencer 
Quintet, hors d'oeuvres, cigars, and dancing. Advance tickets are 
required by calling 776-9850. 



TIME FOR A CHANGE 



_ .-FRI. 7 a.m. - 9 p.m. 
SAT. 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. \ 




IF YOUR BILL IS: You Save: IF YOUR BILL IS: You Save: 

$100 $10.00 $401to$500 $40.00 

$101 to $200 $15.00 $501 to $700 $50.00 

$201 to $300 $20.00 $701 to $900 S75.oo ANY SERVICE I 



UP TO 

$i00 00 



OFF 



.$30.00 $901 + $100.00 



$301toS40Q 53U.UU saui + aiuu.w WORK 111 

I Tta coupon maytHiaod lor work pertonwdm Our jerrcear^-W^i^rmnltwpwer.tediltMl.rwthaoWf owrinenup. 

LOHar good orJy wiin IKi coupon. No other fl.iCOunli eat apply, r Jol «M »m any oti*f coupon o< dteouits. EXPIRES 1 1/30V96. ,' 
m m^ i^n ^M i^« l^" ^™ i^ - (■■ m ■ ^^ ^™ m — ™™ "^ 



PES^ 1 



WORKS LIKE 

LIQUID 

BALL BEARINGS 



COUPON 



j LUBE, OIL $ 1 £95 
l & FILTER AO 

I Rockenbach Chevrolet ' n ' 

L EXPIRES 1 1/30/96 • 1 COUPON PER CUSTOMER PER VISIT |_2 | 



Includes up to 5 quarts ol 
Pennzoil oil and filter. 
Check all fluid levels. 

Please present to Service | 
Advisor upon arrival 



gg^ DISCOVER THE DOTDIEHCE /qJEVHC 



Satur^ 



r< Chevrolet / 



SPECIALS NOT VALID WITH OTHER OFFERS. 

PRESENT COUPONS WHEN ORDER IS WRITTEN, SE HABLA ESPANOL 

(847) 223-2234 

1000 E. BELVIDERE ROAD • GRAYSLAKE, ILLINOIS 60030 






.1/1 



LAKELIFE UkelANd Newspapers NovEMhi-n IE, 1996 



-MoviE Pick — — — — — — 

'Romeo & Juliet flips Bard in grave Be TIhere 




There have been many film ver- 
sions of William Shakespeare's 
tragic teen romance "Romeo and 
Juliet" The star-crossed love story 
has been boring, polished, updat- 
ed and wrung out. 

Leonard Bernstein's musical 
adaptation, "West Side Story," 
brought the lovers into the 1950s 
explosive racial climate, while pre- 
serving the beauty and innocence 
of young love intended by die Bard, 
as did the more faithful, if contro- 
versial, 1968 Franco Zeffirelli classi- 
cal version that also had teen leads. 
When Leonardo DiCaprio and 
Claire Danes fall in love at first sight 
as they gaze at each other through 
an aquarium, in 1996's "Romeo," 
they are at a costume ball where 
they are appropriately dressed as 
an angel and a knight in shinning 
armor. Both DiCaprio and Danes, 
though lacking in the dramatic tal- 
ents befitting Shakespearean per- 
formers, have the freshness, beau- 
ty, and those eyes full of iove, that 
are die core of the Bard's tale. 

The Dee-Jay bash is being given 
by die Capulets, a rival corporate 
endty to the Montague business 
empire. 

The punk-rock, pink-haired, 
youthful members of each empire 
spend die movie speeding around, 
ogling babes on Verona Beach, or 
having a shoot-out at a local service 
station, all to the tune of a song by 
the guy who used to be Prince, 
while a few poetic pearls by 
Shakespeare, done in a California 




SATURdAY 




AAUW plans luncheon 

The Annual Educational Foundation Luncheon will be held 
on Saturday, Nov. 16 at 11:30 a.m. at Raffaelli's Italian Cafe, 
Milwaukee Avenue at Buckley Road, Libertyville. Mary Ellen 
Smyth will be the guest speaker. The topic will be scholarship 
and research fundedlsy the Educational Foundation. For fur- 
ther information, call 367- 

6505 - -Tuesday 



Gem and Mineral Society holds meeting 

The Lake County Gem and Mineral Society wfll meet on 
Nov. 19 at 7 p.m. at the Waukegan Public Library, 128 N. County 
St., Waukegan. A video on "Morrisonite" will be shown. For fur- 
ther information, call Lorraine Albers at 662-6081 or Beverlv 
Millard at 623-3292. J 

— ■ — TkuRsdAy- — — 



Claire Danes and Leonardo Di 

twang, are tossed in for good mea- 
sure. 

As our hero pops pills, smokes 
and shoots a litde pool with today's 
Mercutio, a black drag queen, over- 
played by Harold Perrineau, the 
chaos of teen pleasures heats up. 

What we have here on one hand 
is an overlong flashy MTV video, 
and on the other hand, a sexy, 
seedling, shouting, sound barrier- 
breaking teen action flick, where 
the hero and heroine stare at each 
other soulfully, spout a little 
medieval poetry now and then, and 
Juliet "is the sun" in a lit swimming 
pool. The deadi scene in the church 
becomes almost a lazier light dis- 
play of flaming candles. 

This movie is most definitely 
aimed at the teen audience which 



Caprio 

loves anything starring and about 
teenagers. Those who believe that 
scalding one's eyeballs, while sear- 
ing one's eyebrows, is small price to 
pay for keeping warm, might OK 
this almost blaspheme way of get- 
ting today's teens to digest some 
Shakespeare. 

Because most of the tenderness 
of Shakespeare's story is smashed 
and bashed by the series of psyche- 
delic happenings, and much of the 
beauty of die original tale gets swal- 
lowed up in all tin's eye and ear scar- 
ing audiovisuallity, we give 20th 
Century Fox's spectacularly deca- 
dent "Romeo and Juliet," filmed in 
Mexico and directed by Baz 
Luhrman, 2.5 stars out of five. The 
film carries a PG-13- rating. — by 
GLORIA DAVIS 



Blue Lights plan activities 

Blue Lights Senior Club has moved their first and third 
Thursday meetings to Bertrand's Bowling Alley at 2612 
Washington St., Waukegan. The next meeting is set for Nov. 21 
at 7:30 p.m. Come and hear about all the November activities 
For further information, call 623-5706 or 623-11467. 



CoiviiNq Soon- 



won to meet at Condell 

Widowed Outreach Network of Lake County, a group of wid- 
owers and widows of all ages, meets on the fourth Sunday of 
each month at the Condell Conference Center, 700 Garfield, 
Libertyville, at 2 p.m. The next meeting will be Nov. 24 and the 
program will be Mr. Keenager— Joe Eberhardt— entertaining all 
the 'Humor and Nostalgia/' This group also attends plays, takes 
trips, and dinner at a local restaurant is optional after the meet- 
ing. For further information, call 362-2900, ext. 6275. 

Bicycle Club plans ride 

Bicycle Club of Lake County will hold their monthly meeting 
Tuesday, Nov. 26 at 7 p.m. The meeting location is Libertyville 
Civic Center, 135 W. Church (just south of the library). Social 
events, meetings, and ride information can be obtained by call- 
ing the BCLC hotline at 604-0520. 



wwnwnwnfffffi 



Belvidere Mall 

Theatres 662-741 

Belvidere at Lewis in Waukegan 






SUPERCOP (PG-13). Jackie Chan 
Fri & Mon- Thur, 5:30, 7:30. 9:40 



jjSatJ & Sun. 1:15, 3:15, 5:30, 7:30, 9:40 

CPHAT BEACH (R)- 

CFri. & Man. -Thur. 5:30, 7:30, 9:40 
ESat. & Sun. 1:20, 3:20, 5:30, 7:30, 9:40 

p PHENOMENON (PG) ■ John Traotta 
(]Fri. & Mon. - Thur. 7:10, 9:35 
(]Sat. & Sun. 2:00, 4:30, 7:10. 9:35 



$2.00 all seats all shows a 
Ample Parking ^ 

a 

INDEPENDENCE DAY (PG-13)'-Jelf Goldblum rj 
DAILY 9:20 rj 

Sat. & Sun. 2:30, 9:20 rj 

THE NUTTY PROFESSOR (R) - Di 

Eddie Murphy fj 

DAILY 5:20, 7:15 rj 



GuuuguyuguuuuguuuuuyuuuyuuBQUBUQHUHa 



The Largest Ship Ever Built 

by JIM WARNKEN, PRESIDENT 
NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

Many who have not sailed on one or today's supcrliners still have the idea they will feel cramped 
on a cruise ship. 

Well, let me give you just a Tew statistics on Carnival's newest ship, Ihc Destiny, which, on 
November 24lh, becomes the largest passenger liner ever to sail. 

I could bore you with figures like the Destiny has a displacement of 100.000 tons, is the length or 3 
football fields and a beam (width) of 1 16 reel, making it the only passenger vessel too wide to transit the 
Panama Canal, Instead, lets talk about Ihc stuff that really matters. 

If, on a seven day cruise, you were to visit a different bar or lounge ever night, (such as the Point 
After Dance Club with it's 559 video monitor night) you'd still have 10 more left for your next cruise. 

This doesn't even include the five story (deck) high 1,500 seat Palladium show lounge. Carnival 
claims it is Ihc most sophisticated ever to be included on a cruise ship. It has technology to provide 
modem spcical effects such as "flying" pcrfbmicrs over the audience, 

There's plenty of daytime activities, loo. How many land-based resorts do you know thai boast a 
choice of four swimming pools, two with swim-up bars, and a 214-foot water slide? 

You'd also have a hard time finding a Caribbean hotel with a 15,000-squarc fool two level spa like 
the one on the Destiny, with state-of-the-art workout facilities, juice bar, whirlpools, sauna, massage and 
jogging tracks. 

If you think you might feel claustrophobic, even in the extra large cabins on the Destiny, just walk 
out onto your private balcony. Over a third of the Destiny's cabins (not just the suites) have them. 

Upon boarding the Destiny you get an immediate feeling of openness as you cnlcr a 9-deck high, 
glass domed atrium with landscaped terraces. During Ihc day the atruim is lighted by the glow of filtered 
sunlight. At night the stars become your ceiling. 

While Ihc Destiny's "Millionaire's Club" casino may not be quile as large as the super resorts of 
Las Vegas, it is the biggest to be found on a cruise ship, complete with roulette, slots, craps, Caribbean 
stud poker and Wheel of fortune. 

Since the Destiny's first sailing comes during a slow lime for cruising, and, quite frankly, a lime of 
over capacity in the cruise markcl, you're not going to believe the cost of a seven day cruise on the 
newest, and largest ship afloat. 

2234 E. Grand Lindenhurst, 
24 Hr. Recorded Bargains - 356-2000 

(847) 356-301 



ffpm&Im 

ld>J/ Presents \&\ ' 

™ Wizard of Oz ^* 

By Baum.Arlen & Harburg 

November 22, 23, 24* 29, 30 

December 1* 6, 7, 8*, 13, 14, 15* 

Fri. & Sat. 8 p.m. 

Sunday Matinee 2:30 p.m. 

Adults $10*; Students & Seniors $8* 

Call for Reservations 

(847) 395-3055 

PM&L Theatre • 877 Main St., Antioch 

Box Ofllco Hours: Starling Nov. 1 1 
^^ m ^ Mon. thru Thurs, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Sat. 1 1 -2 r — — 

LU£JJ 1 W2 Ufa. betoro showtime. Flosofvod Seating. VISA/MC iS£» 



Mom's Club of Gurnce 

The Mom's Club of Gurneo 
has a new.contact person. For 
club information, call Karen at 
662-1152. 



L 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 
SUBSCRIBE TODAY! 

223-8161 



General Cinema 

LAKEHURST 



3 



ClN|l1[XOl«»J 



CiNEpiex OdeoN TIieatres 



RIVERTREE GGURT 



Tiic Mirror Has Two Faces (PG-13) (Dolby Stereo) -On 2 Satens 
Fri., Mon. -Thurs. d:15, 7:15, 'JiOO, 9:55; Sot.-Sun,. (12:30), 1:30, 3:30, 4:30, 6:15, 7:15, 9:0(1, 'J:55 



RaitSom* (It) (Dolby Stervo) -No/msscs 
In., Mon. -Tliuni. 630, 7:00, 8:45, 9:45; Sat.-Sun., (12:45), 1:45, 3:15, 4:15, 6:00, 7:00, K:45, 9:45 



Larger Titan Life (PG) (dts Stereo) 

Fri.,Mmi.-Thurs., 630; Snl„ Sun. (1:15), 3:25 



, Michael Collins (K) (Dolby siemo 

Fri., Mun.-Thurs., (9:25); Sill, fit Sun. 6:30,925 



Sleepers an (dts stereo) 

Fri,, Mon.-Tlwrs., 6:35, 930; Snt. & Sun. (12:50), 3:10, 635, 9:3(1 



High School High (PG-13) (Dolby Stereo) 
Fri,, Mon.-Thurs., 9.40; Sat.-Sun. (3:50), 9:40 



Tfiat Tiling You Do (PG) (DTS stereo) 
Fri., Mun.-nuirs., 7:20; Sat.-Sun. (1:40), 7:20 



ROUTE 43 near ROUTE 120 
473-4200 

BARGAIN MAT1HIIJ IVIRJ D*T 
ALL SHOWS DlfOBI 6 PM 

IsET IT OFF (R)( on 2 screens) 

|FRI -SAT. 1*0,2:00.3:40. 4:40, 630. 720,9:10. 10.00, 11:40 
ISUN.- 1:00, 2.<», 3:40, 4:40, 6:30, 720. 9:10, 10.00 
ImON.-THUR. 4:40, 6:30, 7:20 ,9:10,1000 

SPACE JAM IPG) ( on 3 screens) 

FRI.- SAT. 12:00. 12:45, 1:30, 2:00. 2:45, 3:30. 
4:00, 4:45. 5.30, 6:00. 6:45, 7:30, 8:00, B:45, 9:30, 
] 10:00, 10:45, 11:30 
SUN. - 12:00, 12:45. 1:30, 2:00, 2:45, 3:30,4:00, 
4:45, 5:30, 6:00, 6:45, 8:00, 8:45, 9:30, 10:00 
MON.-THUR. 4:45, 5:30, 6:00. 6:45. 7:30. 8:00, 
8:45. 9:30. 10:00 



I RANSOM (R) ( on 2 screens) 

FRI - SUT. 1 fl). 2.00. 3:40. 4:40. 6:30, 720, 9:10, 1 0.00, 1 1:40 
SUN.- 1:00, 2:00, 3:40, 4:40. 6:30. 720, 9:10, 10.00 
I MON.-THUR, 4:40, 630, 730, 9:10, 10:00 

I SLEEPERS (R) 

FRI.-SUN.12:45, 3:45, 0:45, 9:45 
I MON.-THUR. 5:00,8:00 

| FLY AWAY HOME (PG) 

FHI.-SUN. 2:15, 5:00 
MQN.-THUn. 5:00 ONLY 

THINNER (R) 

|FRI.-THUR.7:30,9:4O 




HAWTHORN CENTER 



Romeo & Juliet* (PG-n) (Stereo) 

Fri, Mun.-Tluirs., 7:20, 9:50; Snl.-Sun. (1:15), 4:30, 7:21), 9;50 



'Nu ['asses 



Space Jam (PG) (DTS'Stereo)-No Pusses-Oil 3 Screens 
Fri.,Mun.-Tliurs., 5:00, 5:3(1, 6:(X), 7:110, 7:30, H:IK1, 9:1X1, 9:30, 10:00 

Sat. - Sun. (11:00), 1 1:30, 12:00, 1:00, 1:30, 2:IX), 3:IX), 3:30, 4:1X1, 5:(X», 

5:30, 6:(X), 7:1X1, 7:3(1, H:(XI, 9;(K), 9:30, 10:1X1 



HIGH SCHOOL HIGH (PG-13) 



IFRI.-SUN. 1:30, 3:30. 5:30, 730. 930 
I MON.-THUR. 5:30. 7:30,9:30 



. imK 



ROMEO AND JULIET (PG-13) 

IfRI,- SUN. 2:00, 430, 7:00. 9:30 
IMON-THUR. 4:30. 7:00, 9:30 



MIRROR HAS TWO FACES (PG-13) 

I FRI.-SUN. 12.00. 2:30, 5 00, 7:30, 10 00 
I MON.-THUR. 5:0O. 7:30. 10:00 



GIFT CERTIFICATES ON SALE ; 



3 



i? 






. 



y 





*n.rv 




NoveMbER 15, 1996 UkElANd Newspapers LAKELIFE 



William Akey, Mary Beth Dolan, Michael Cline 

Cmiic's ChoicE 



Marriott's 'Singin' isn't slicker 



Popular novels sometimes 
translate badly when made into a 
movie. 

A great Broadway play doesn't 
always make the transition to the 
film world successfully. 

This time a classic MGM musi- 
cal has been put on the boards and 
placed behind the footlights 
instead of in front of the cameras. 
Surprisingly magical entertain- 
ment is the result for the most part 
at the Marriott Lincolnshire 
Theatre where "Singin' in the 
Rain" has just started its run 
through the Christmas holidays. 

Marriott director, Dyanne 
Earley's, talent matures each time 
she directs a Marriott show. 
As in the movie, the story of the 
death of the silent film and the 
birth of the "talkie" is enacted 
with Michael Clinc playing the 
matinee idol, Don Lockwood. 
Mary Beth Dolan sails sweetly all 
over the stage as his soul mate, 
starlet Kathy Seldon. 

William Akey plays die epito- 
me of clowns, Cosmo Brown, and 
that gravel voiced scene stealer, 
Angela Berra as Lina Lamont com- 
pletes the cast. 

When die "talkies" arrive, die 
king of the silent movies, 
Lockwood, makes the change over 
beautifully, but alas and alack, for 
his co-star Lamont's gravel voice 
forces her to seek a little behind 
the curtain audio dubbing from 
Seldon to get even for Lockwood's 
lack of interest. 

The part of Lamont was writ- 
ten as a scene stealer and Berra 
does her duty to the audience's 
delight. 

Cline's Lockwood, loosely 
modeled after Gene Kelly's inter- 
pretation, is enjoyable when he's 
got his dancin' shoes on. Like 
Kelly, Lockwood is a dancer that 
does some singing. 

What's missing here is the 
singing style that Kelly developed 
to balance his lack of voice. His co- 



star, Dolan, keeps up with those 
flying feet, but she's no Debbie 
Reynolds in the voice department. 

Of course the famous rain 
sequence is even more spectacular 
done on a live stage with real water 
that just has to get some members 
of the audience a little damp, 
thanks to the genius of set designer 
Thomas Ryan and master choreo- 
grapher Marc Robin 

Rivaling that scene wiUi the tal- 
ent of its performer is Akey's 
exhausting version of the Donald 
O'Connor smash "Make 'Em 
Laugh." He and Cline also trip the 
light fantastic in "Fit As A Fiddle." 
with alacrity. 

Kelly and O'Connor will always 
be remembered for their screen 
performances in this, rated by 
experts one of the top five musical 
movies of all time. Yet both of 
them could do die dances in sever- 
al sequences, reshooting any mis- 
takes immediately. 

This is what makes the live per- 
formances of Cline and Akey in die 
"Rain" and "Laugh" numbers, and 
their ability to bring a smile to the 
lips of the audience, worth that 
thunderous applause they receive. 
The chemistry between Dolan 
and Lockwood doesn't leap out at 
you, but they go together well and 
die choreography of Robin lifts 
the "Good Morning' triplet by 
Cline, Dolan and Akey, to upper 
musical levels. 

The show stopper of Marriott's 
production is die "Beautiful Girls" 
number thanks to the resident cos- 
tume designer Nancy Missimi, Las 
Vegas showgirls have nothing on 
Marriott's chorus. 

As it did over 40 years ago, die 
music of "Singin' in the Rain," by 
Arthur Freed and N.H. Brown, will 
have your toes tapping all during 
the performance and you will 
leave the theater humming its 
tunes, while looking for a lamp- 
post to swing around, rain or 
no t._by GLORIA DAVIS 



Indoor plants add beauty all year long 



Indoor plants add greenery, 
beauty all year long 

Growing plants indoors satis- 
fies my need to have some type of 
greenery around me throughout 
die year. "Forget it!" you say— not 
me, everything I try to grow 
indoors dies! You don't have to be 
a florist or have a green house to 
be successful— any windowsill and 
a little knowledge will do. 

Almost every kind of plant can 
be grown in pots. Granted the 
plants have to adjust to lower 
amounts of sunshine, hotter tem- 
peratures, and low levels of 
humidity, especially in the winter 
months. But we can make it work. 

Naturally flowering plants add 
the most beauty to our homes. 
There are many kinds of house- 
plants that flower, many last for 
years and bloom constantly. 
Among them are the African vio- 
lets, always a favorite with their 
blossoms of pink, blue, purple and 
white. There are the wax begonias 
with their petite pink, white or red 
blooms, and the Chinese hibiscus 
(my personal favorite), with its 
blooms of pink, yellow, white, red 
or orange which average four to : 
five inches across. I've heard of 
hibiscus lasting for 25 years! Once 
you have decided on which plants 
to grow, take a look about your 
home and decide where they will 
fair the best. Within our homes we 
have a wide range of climates. 
Some rooms are cooler, some 



more humid (kitchen and bath), 
some offer better light (generally 
south and west exposures). 

When choosing a plant, choose 
one that is bushy, short, and that 



(jardener'& 




has one blossom but many buds, 
yet to bloom. If you choose one 
that is first budding it should 
prove to be more prolific, and 
you'll be able to enjoy its life from 
the beginning. Make sure you 
check the plant for any signs of 
insect damage. Any lighter, yellow, 
or brown spots on the underside 
of the leaves, indicate insects suck- 
ing the precious juices of the plant. 
Pass that one by! 

All plants have different needs 
and the closer you come to a repli- 
cating their native environment 
die better they will perform. But it 
is not always easy. If a plant is 
doing well, leave it be, if not— 
move it! Use your common sense 
keeping in mind the plant's partic- 
ular needs. African violets for 
instance, do not need direct sun- 
light. They thrive in bright or cur- 
tain filtered light, in day temps of 
75. While hibiscus needs at least 
four hours of direct sunlight and 



MOVIES & TIMES START FRIDAY 11/15/96 



*****+*••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••< 



: LAKE ZURICH THEATRES 

• , Located on Rt 12 Near 22 

v 847-550-0000 

Surround Sound 10 Screens 



$6.50 Adults Alt or 5 P.M. 
S3.SO Children Under 11 



$ 3 50 



Daily Afternoon Shows 

Mon.-Frl. Till 5 PM 
Sat. & Sun. Till 2:30 PM 




E 



ANTIOCH (847) 395-0216 
. 378 Lake St. Anttoch 



ADULTS S4.00 CHILDREN $2.00 
$2.00 BARGAIN MATINEE TILL 5 P.M. 

CJ^ IHEMlf OR SHOW & TIMES 



• LIBERTY 1&2 (847) 362-3011 

" 708 N. Milwaukee Ave., Llbertyvfllo 



ADULTS S4.00 CHILDREN 11 & UNDER S2.00 

52.00 BARGAIN MATINEE: 

SAT & SUN. UNTIL 2:30 




CALL THEATRE 
FOR SHOWS & TIMES 



Mchenry 1 & 2 

1204 N. Green SL (815) 385-0144 
ADULTS S3.00 CHILDREN 11 4 UNDER S1.5Q 



51. 50 Bargain Matinee Until 5 pm 

CALL THEATRE 
FOR SHOWS & TIMES 






s $$MgM$M^XMM^ 



s 



M 



November 17, 1996 

LAKE COUNTY SPORTSMEN & GUN COLLECTOR'S SHOW 



TABLES 

AVAILABLE 

: 0H DEALERS! 



Illinois' Largest 

Gun Show! 

Over 650 

Exhibitors 



FREE 
PARKING!, 



FOX LAKE THEATRE (84- 

1 15 Lakeland Plaza • Fox Lake gei 



PLAYING 11/15 -11/21 



(847) 973-2800 £j» 

GEN ADMISSION SS 5 PM ' 



LARGER THAN 






FRI. 7:55 

SAT./SUN./WED.2:45, 7:55 
MON./TUE./THUR. 7:55 



THE MIRROR HAS TWO FACES* (PG-13) 

FRI. 5:05, 7:35, 10:10 

SAT. 12:00, 2:35, 5:05, 7:35, 10:10 

„_ _,SUN7WEO. 12:00, 2:35, 5:05, 7:35 

DDt^^aa MON/TUE.^THUR. 5:05, 7:35 



w 



RANSOM U 

SAT. 12:10, 2:40. 5:10, 7:45, 10:15 

»* * SUNJWED. 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:45 

mre—T Ba MONJTUE/THUR. 5:10, 7:45 



SPACE JAM* (PG) 

3 FRI. 5:15, 7:05, 9:00 

SATJSUNJWED, 1230, 3:00, 5:15, 7:05, 9:00 

- ■ MON/TUE/THUR. 5:15, 7:05, 9fl0 



DEAR GOD (PG) 






FRI. 5:20 
SAT./SUN./WED. 12:20, 5:20 
MON./TUE./THUR. 5:20 



*NO PASSES OR COUPONS 






lovember 17, 1996 

Birr » SELL * TRADE 

Firearms & Related Items, 

Military Surplus & Antiques & Collectibles 

Held at 

LAKE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS 

Rte. 1 20 at Rte. 45 

Near I-94 • Exit from 94 West on Ria. 120- Fairgrounds opprox. 3 miles W. on Rio. 120 

Enter Fairgrounds Irom Rto. 120 or Conler St. 



9> 



ADMISSION: 
$5.00 ADULTS 
^CHILDREN UNDER 12 FREE 



SHOW ALL 
INDOORS 



OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 
8A.M.-2RM. 



For Information call Lake County Gun Collectors 




*g P.O. Box 1667 
*&t Arlington Hts., IL 



84 1/5 7 7-8 18P 

sc2*' Mningion ms., ii_ ■ - ; . . / .. ., /t /t , c 






day. temps of 70 or higher. And the 
ever popular Irhpatiens can be 
grown in bright indirect light, or 
shade. Temps of 75 are ideal. 

You can supplement the lack 
of sun with artificial lights. But 
remember, all flowering plants 
need rest, so don't expose them to 
more than 12 to 16 hours of light a 
day. 

Just as light is crucial to 
plantlife, so is water. But, please 
don't overdo it! More plant are 
murdered by overwatering, than 
any other cause! Plants can not 
thrive with soggy roots, they rot' 
and die. Let them become moder- 
ately dry, before watering. And if a 
plant is "resting" or has become 
dormant, hold backwater entirely. 
Those that are completely dor- 
mant should not be watered until 
signs of new growth appear. A 
good indication of a dormant 
plant, is the lack of all top growth. 
Best time to water is in the morn- 
ing, and use tepid water. Any 
excess water remaining in trays or 
saucers after a half hour should be 
removed to prevent soggy roots. 



GURNEE CINEMA 

GURNEE MILLS SHOPPING MALL • 
847-855-9940 



SRCIT. SPECIAL J2J0 WEDS 1 FRI AFTEflNOOH, 

BARGAIN MATINEES - ADULTS M.5D BEFORE 530 

CHILDREN UNOEH t HOT AfflHTITD TO V RATH) rE*TWE5 

V K» [bum m Uei* Fun Tiduti mtgti 

FEATURES AND SHOWT1MES FOR FRIDAY, 

KOVEMBEH 15 THRU THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 21 



SPACE JAM* {3 scrs) PG 

F4SU 10-.30, 11:10, 11:50, 1230, 1:10, 150, 230, 
110, 3:50, 4:30, 5:10, 550, 630, 7:10, 750, 830, 
9:10, 950; M-TH 430, 5:10, 550, 630, 7:10, 750, 
330,9:10,950 



RANSOM (2 SCRS) r 

F-SU 11:45, 1:00, 2:15, 330, 4:45, &QQ, 7:15, fc30, 9:45 
M-TH 4.45. 6J0, 7:15, 830, 9:45 



THE MIRROR HAS TWO FACES* 

1 12 SCRS) PG-13 j 

If-SU 12:10, 130, 2:45, 435, 520, 7:00, 830, 935; 

iM-TH 425, 520, 730, 830. 935 



[ROMEO & JULIET* PG-13 

IF-SU 12SQ.235, 5:10, 735,10*0; M-TH 5:10,735, KWQl 



ISLEEPERS R 

If-su 1230, aao, eao, 930; m-th sdo, mo 



LARGER THAN LIFE PG 

IF-SU 1250; 255, 5S0, 7*5. 9:10; M-TH 5*10, 7.-05, 9:10 I 



IGHOST IN THE DARKNESS ft 

If-su 1230, 2*5, ws. 735. 935; m-th sxa, 735, 935 



IFIRST WIVES CLUB PG 

If-su 1250, 235, 5:15, 720. 925,- m-th ms, 72a 925 



DEAR GOD PG 

|f-SU 225, 730; M-TH 730 



THINNER R 

If-su 1220, 450, 925; m-th 4:$o, 925 



FLY AWAY HOME PG 

|f-SU 12:10, 225; M-TH 4:40 



IHIGH SCHOOL HIGH PG-13 

F-SU 5:30, 7:30, 930; M-TH 730, 930 




ShowPlaceS 

VERNON HILLS_ 

Milwaukee Ave-2nd Light S of (ED 
847/2 47-8958 

RET 










r 






All Times. 



Effective Fridiy, Not. 1 5 thru Thurscty, Nov. 2 1 , 1 9% 

JACK (PG-I3) In Dolby Digital 
4:l5.7:00,9:40;SaL/Sun.Matinee l:30 

BASQUIAT (R) In Dolby Digital 
5:00,7:30, 1 Ch00;SatJSun. Matinee 2: 1 5 

LONE STAR (R) In Dolby Stereo 
S: 1 5. 8: 1 S; SatJSun. Matinee 200 

THE HUNCHBACK OF 

NOTRE DAME (G) In Dolby Digital 

4:00, 6:30, 9:00; SarJSun. Matinee 1 :30 

PHENOMENON (PG) In Dolby Digiul 
4:00. 6:45, 9:30; Sat/Sun. Matinee 1 :00 

COURAGE UNDER EIRE 

(R) In DTS Digiul 

4:30. 7: 1 5, 9:50; SaL/Sun. Matinee l:45 

A TIME TO KILL (R) in dts Digiul 
4:30, 7:45; SatJSun. Matinee 1 :00 

INDEPENDENCE DAY (PG-l3)| fl DTSDi P ai 
4:45. 8:00; SatJSun. Matinee I: IS 



Free Refill, on Popcorn & Sot l Drinks! 
P™"1 ALL . rrai 



DIGITAL SOUND 







HEALTHWATCH UkeUNd Newspapers NovEivibER 1 5, 1996 



I 






i 



Good SlHEpktRcl 
HospiTAl 



Arthritis talk 

The Senior Passport ! 
Program of Good Shepherd 
Hospital is presenting an 
arthritis lecture called "Not 
Just Aches arid Pains." Guest 
speaker for the presentation 
will be Carey B. Daehman, 
MD, a specialist in rheuma- 
tology. The presentation will 
be held on Friday, Nov. 22 
from 1:30 to 3 p.m. in the 
Meadow Room of Good 
Shepherd Hospital. 

There is no charge for 
attending the event, howev- 
er, seating is limited. 
Reservation may be made by 
calling 382-7277 or 381- 
0123, ext. 5441. 

Ex-smokers group 

A free ex-smokers sup- 
port group, offered by Good 
Shepherd Hospital's Health 
Evaluation Lifestyle 
Programs (HELP) depart- 
ment, will meet from 7:30 to 
9 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 21, 
the day of the Great 
American Smokeout. The 
meetings, which are held the 
third Thursday of each 
month at the hospital, offer 
participants a chance to. 
share experiences and offer 
support to each other as 
they continue to lead 
smoke-free lives. For more 
information or to register, 
call 1(800)474-3278. 



ConcIeII MecHcaI 
Center- 



Condell talks 

"Condell Talks: Dialogue 
with the Doctors," a free 
health education series, will 
present James L/Milam, 
MD, obstetrician/gynecolo- 
gist and a member of 
Condell's Medical Staff, in 
the community room at the 
Condell Acute Care Center, 
150 Half Day Rd., Buffalo at 
7:30 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 
18. Dr. Milam will discuss 
"Let's Talk About Women's 
Health," a presentation of 
women's health and well- 
ness issues through the life 
stages of puberty, adoles- 
cence and young adulthood. 
To make a reservation, call 
362-2905, ext. 5770. 

Need each other 

"We Need Each Other," a 
support group for people 
with chronic pain and their 
families meet at 7:30 p.m. on 
Tuesday, Nov. 19 in the 
solarium at the Condell Day 
Center for Intergenerational 
Care, 700 Garfield Ave., 
Libertyville. The group for- 
mat is designed to provide 
emotional support and fel- 
lowship through discussion, 
featured speakers on chron- 
ic pain topics and shared 
coping strategies. For infor- 
mation, call the Outpatient 
Physical Therapy Center at 
680-1092. 






|j\kE Forest 
HospiTAl 



R.T.S. bereavement 

Resolve Through Sharing 
Bereavement Services sup- 
ports parents who have lost a 
baby through miscarriage, 
ectopic pregnancy, stillbirth 
or newborn death. This group 
meets on the third Tuesday of 
each month at 7 p.m. in the 
Westmoreland Nursing 
^Center. Call 234-6161 for fur- 
ther details. 



Take charge of diabetes from 'head to toe' 



Free information available during 
National Diabetes Month. With the national 
human and economic costs of diabetes total- 
ing over 178,000 deaths and $100 billion 
annually, the 16 million Americans with this 
disease and their health care providers have 
more reason than ever to become more 
proactive in diabetes care. Advances in tech- 
nology, new treatments, and a transforming 
health care system have made it a national 
priority for the American Diabetes 
Association to inform those with diabetes how 
to take charge of their care and alert health 
care providers to the latest advances in dia- 
betes research and standards of patient care. 

November is National Diabetes Month, 
when the American Diabetes Association 
spreads the word to those affected by diabetes 
about the benefits of controlling blood sugar 
levels closer to normal to prevent the devas- 
tating complications of diabetes. For 1996, 



activities for patients and their families will be 
centered on the theme, "Diabetes. What to 
Know: Head to Toe." The centerpiece of this 
campaign is a free brochure which converts 
into a colorful, easy-to-read poster and pro- 
vides a step-by-step guide at every visit and 
annual dilated eye exams. 

"Diabetes is a serious and lifelong disease 
leading to complications of the circulatory 
and nervous systems," said Mark Molitch, 
president of the Northern Illinois Affiliate of 
the American Diabetes Association. 
"Understanding the 'system-wide' approach 
to treatment — through diet, exercise, self 
monitoring, and medication — is critical to 
improving the lives of people with diabetes." 

More than 610,000 Illinois residents have 
diabetes. Approximately 8,000 of these indi- 
viduals will die this year from diabetes com- 
plications, such as heart disease, kidney dis- 
ease, and stroke. Others will suffer from blind- 



ness and lower limb amputation. Finally, this 
serious disease costs Illinois nearly $1.2 bil- 
lion annually in medical and productivity 
expenses. 

All people with diabetes shouldseek their 
treatment and care from physician-coordi- 
nated teams that include, but are not limited 
to, physicians, nurses, dietitians, and mental 
health professionals with an expertise and a 
special interest in diabetes. Controlling dia- 
betes involves a combination of weight man- 
agement through exercise and meal planning, 
glucose monitoring, and/or oral medication 
for those with non-insulin-dependent (Type 
II) diabetes. In addition, all people with 
insulin-dependent (Type I) diabetes must 
take insulin. 

"For too long, people with diabetes have 
not had the information and technology to 
take charge of their care," said Dr. Molitch. 
See DIABETES page Bll 



HEALTHWATCH 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Heart, vascular facility offers diagnostic services in Gurnee 



STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter 

Gurnee is now home to the 
latest in heart and vascular diag- 
nostic services, located at the 
Heart and Vascular Center. 

The outpatient center is lo- 
cated at 1 South Greenleaf. 
Opened for three months, it has 
four examination rooms, confer- 
ence rooms and capabilities for 
teleconferencing with Children's 
Memorial Hospital of Chicago. 

Jaya and Isaac Thomas Ltd. 
are the owners of the facility. 
"We focus on patient education 
— we have lots of educational 
videos," Dr. Jaya Thomas said. 

The staff includes: board cer- 
tified cardiologists, board certi- 
fied radiologists, vascular spe- 



cialists, certified cardiovascular 
nurse clinician and board regis- 
tered sonographers and board 
resistered echocardiographers. 

Because of the teleconferenc- 
ing, physicians in Gurnee can 
relay information about a pe- 
diatric echocardiography to 
Children's Memorial Hospital 
and receive direct diagnosis. 

' Patients can see the actual 
stress tests at work as the walls of 
the hearts are shown on a video- 
screen. 

The Thomases said the 
Gurnee area was a natural for 
their location, hoping to attact 
patients from western Lake 
County as well. 



Among the services now of- 
fered: Treadmill Exercise Testing; 
Pharmacological stress and lower 
and upper extremity venous 



duplex sonography. 

Services coming in the near 
future: transtelephonic pace- 
maker checks. 



Highland Park Hospital 
auxiliary celebrates 75 years 



Established in 1921, the 
Auxiliary of Highland Park 
Hospital is celebrating its 75th 
anniversary. "We've come a long 
way since 1921, when 24 volun- 
teers made surgical dressings," 
says Auxiliary President Ginny 
Schulte. 

Through the years, the 
Auxiliary has grown in its ability 
to provide financial support and 
needed services to Highland Park 
Hospital. Today, the Auxiliary has 
a membership of more than 700 
men and women who donate 
thousands of volunteer hours to 
the hospital. 

"The Auxiliary has taken an 
active role in volunteerism," says 
hospital president and CEO 
Ronald G. Spaeth. "Volunteers 
are critical to the successful oper- 
ation of Highland Park Hospital. 
Additionally, the Auxiliary's fund- 
raising and community outreach 
efforts are invaluable." 

In the past 20 years alone, the 
Auxiliary has given over $2 mil- 
lion to the hospital. Most recent- 
ly, the Auxiliary gave $50,000 
towards a $250,000 pledge for 
creation and operation of the 
new Osteoporosis Prevention 
and Research Center. 

"This is the first center of its 



kind on the North Shore, and we 
are proud to provide support for 
prevention and research of osteo- 
porosis," says Schulte. Additional 
projects the Auxiliary has helped 
to make possible include a recov- 
ery room in the Surgical Pavilion, 
the Cardiac Rehabilitation Center 
and equipment, renovation of the 
Outpatient Treatment Center, 
the nursing station in the Family 
Birthing Center, and mammogra- 
phy equipment. 

The Alcove Gift Shop, Coffee 
Bar, and Mobile Meals are all 
Auxiliary-sponsored, volunteer- 
run, hospital services. Other ser- 
vices made possible by the 
Auxiliary include the coordina- 
tion of LifeSource blood donor 
drives; Breakfast Club lectures; 
the Remembrance Fund, which 
provides financial support to the 
Alternative Adult Day Service; 
and an annual health care educa- 
tion scholarship awarded to a 
deserving hospital Associate. 

For more information or to 
become an Auxiliary member, 
contact the hospital Volunteer 
Office at 480-3919. 

Highland Park Hospital is a 
member of Northwestern 
Healthcare and is located at 718 
Glenview Ave. in Highland Park. 




John Erickson shows off one of the many diagnostic tools available 
at the Heart and Vascular Center of Gurnee. The facility held at 
open house. 

Free knee, hip joint 
screenings available 

Free screenings designed to determine the cause of knee and hip joint 
pain and identify treatment alternatives available to treat pain will be 
offered under the expertise and direction of Dr. Mitchell Sheinkop and the 
experienced Adult and Pediatric Orthopedics (APO) staff. These screenings 
will provide each participant with a thorough examination of the affected 
joint and an evaluation discussing treatment options and alternatives. Tills 
will be followed up by a letter or call from Dr. Sheinkop to answer any fur- 
ther questions. 

Dr. Sheinkop is a board certified orthopaedic surgeon and associate 
professor at Rush Medical College, He has more than 25 years of experience 
working with individuals who have varying degrees of joint pain resulting 
from a past injury, artliritis or osteoporosis. He is a recognized leader in the 
field of joint reconstruction surgery and is experienced in the latest tech- 
nologies and rehabilitation programs. 

These obligation-free screenings will be held at the Adult and Pediatric 
Orthopedics offered located at 555 Corporate Woods Parkway in Vernon 
Hills, To schedule a free screening appointment call 634-9400. Free screen- 
ing dates are available Nov. 19, 20 and 21 from 3 to 7 p.m. 




NovtMbtR 15, 1996 UkElANd Newspapers 



HEALTH WATCH 




Career celebrations 

Above left, Patricia Behling, RN, vice president and Nancy 
Sisiow, RN, assistant vice president, patient care services 
(right), present Mairi Pillie-Jakubiak, RN of Lake Villa, with a 
gift in recognition for her 30 years of nursing at Victory 
Memorial Hospital. Below, Mary Pergander, vice president, 
Victory Memorial Hospital, congratulates Wayne Bohning of 
Zion for 35 years of accomplishments in the hospital's 
Diagnostic Imaging Department. 



JSIS&H 




Your 





by Charlotte R Nielsen O.D. 

One of the popular misconceptions about the 
eyes and vision is that if you see "20/20", there is no 
need for corrective lenses. Strange as it may seem, 
this-is not always true. If the eyes are perfectly normal 
in every respect, correction may not be needed, but 
even imperfect eyes may sometimes rate 20/20 
when tested. 

Young, farslghted people can depend on their 
strong, near-focusing muscles- and flexible lenses to 
focus on close objects. However, the constant use of 
the muscles to make this unnatural correction often 
results in eyestrain, eye fatigue and headaches, 
especially while reading. 

Corrective lenses should help the eyes to focus on 
nearby objects without strain. To maintain easy strain- 
free vision, have your eyes examined periodically. 



\ r ^ 




VISION CARE ASSOCIATES 



Survey canvasses pediatricians who are 
parents on most effective kid cold treatment 




Pediatricians don't want parents 
to get snowed by the flurry of myths 
about the proper way to treat' the 
common cold. Since colds can't be 
prevented, the pros recommend 
taking a targeted approach to alle- 
viating their children's cold symp- 
toms to make them feel better. 

According to a recent survey of 
pediatricians who are parents 85 
percent revealed that their children 
catch as many as three colds during 
the winter. 

For the second consecutive/ 
year, The Triaminic Parents Club 
has sponsored the study, "House 
Calls: Pediatricians' Hot Tips for the 
Cold Season," giving parents the 
opportunity to hear directly from 
pediatricians who also are parents 
about how they treat their own chil- 
dren's colds. 

The survey, which also asked the 
doctors for their thoughts regarding 
how concerned parents should 
alleviate children's discomfort 
when suffering from a cold, 
revealed that pediatricians believe 
keeping a written log at home that 
details their children's specific cold 
and cough symptoms is important. 



Dr. C.F. Nielsen, Dr. W.B. Lyons, Dr. E.L. Friedman 
2403 Grand Ave., Waukegan 

847-662-3800 



In fact, 60; percent of the pedia- 
tricians surveyed think parents and 
children would benefit from keep- 
ing a written log so they can track 
recurring symptoms, provide their 
doctors with comprehensive infor- 
mation about their children's ill- 
nesses and help parents to properly 
diagnose their children's cold 
symptoms before dosing them with 
over-the-counter medication. 

"It is frustrating for anyone with 
a child to not have a cure for the 
common cold," said Paula Elbirt, 
MD, mother of three, and co- 
author of "A New Mother's Home 
Companion," a guide through the 
first three months of life. 
"Therefore, I tell parents that they 
need to face the fact that colds are 
here to stay and they should adopt 
a symptom targeted approach to 
treating their children's colds." 

Seventy seven percent of the 
pediatricians surveyed agreed that 
parents need to select an over-the- 
counter medication for their child 
that treats specific cold symptoms. 
In fact, 60 percent of the doctors 
surveyed said they would never 
give their own child a multi-symp- 



tom medication that treats. symp- 
toms the child does not have. 

"Too many parents react 
instantly to a child's cough or stuffy 
nose by giving them an all-purpose 
cold and cough formula to make 
mem feel better," said Dr. Elbirt. 
"An all-in-one form of treatment 
can be potentially harmful to a 
child if, for example, a parent has 
given a child acetaminophen and 
then also administers a multi- 
symptom medicine that includes 
acetaminophen." 

The Cold/Cough Symptom 
Tracker is now available to parents 
courtesy of the Triaminic Parents 
Club. Parents can use this free 
booklet to accurately record their 
children's cold symptoms and use 
as a reference tool when communi- 
cating with, their pediatrician^ It 
can help them recognize important 
patterns in illness and symptoms 
their pediatricians should know 
about. 

Parents can order The 
Cold/Cough Symptom Tracker, 
courtesy of the Triaminic Parents 
Club, by calling the toll-free num- 
ber, 1-888-WELL-K3D. . 



ML Victory Hospital Foundation presents the 5th Annual 

j * festival of Trees 

ff^M A A holiday wonderland, offering 

til/ 



great fun for the entire family 1 



Nov. 21 - 23 
Nov. 24 



10. a.m. -9 p.m. 
10 a.m. -5 p.m. 



Featuring 

Displays of trees and wreaths; a Holiday House gift shop; 
entertainment; a wide array of children 's activities; 
a bake shop;. craft area and much, much more.., 

S pecial Attractions 

Preview Party and Auction - Wednesday, Nov. 20, 7 p.m. ($75) 
A gala event to kick off the Festival with elegance, 

Corporate/Family Day - Thursday, Nov. 21 (All children free) 

Holiday Dazzle without the Frazzle - Thursday, Nov. 21, 7 p.m. ($15 j$20 at door) 
A holiday entertaining program designed to make you the belle of every 
party. 

Frolic with Frosty - Friday, Nov. 22, 6 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 23, 11 a.m. \2 p.m.; 
Sunday, Nov. 24, 2 p.m. ($7) ■ 
A children's theme party with entertainment, treats and much more. 



Location 

Midlane Country Club 
4555 Yorkhouse Road, Wadsworth, Illinois 

The Loft Restaurant is open throughout 
the Festival of Trees. 



General Admission 

$31 Adults $2fSeniors 
$1.50jChildren (ages 3-12) 





Rt. 173 






Midlane 


Yorkhouse Rd. 


Country r~ 
Club 

Grand Ave. 


Green Bay Rd. 
Sheridan Rd. 









For information or to order event tickets, 
contact Laura Stone at (847) 360-4246. 

•Proceeds benefit Victory Memorial Hospital's Cardiac Services 
Victory Memorial Hospital, 1324 N. Sheridan Road, Waukegan, Illinois 




3 HEALTHWATCH LaI^anc! Newspapers NoveiwbER 15/ 1996 



1 






HEAlrh BrjeFs 

GSH offers OCD class 

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) can be about almost 
anything-^-eating, cleaning, hand-washing, showering, repeti- 
tive movements, obsessive worries, impulses or ritual behaviors 
such as counting, collecting or hoarding of objects. As many as 
one in 50 people experience OCD, which often coexists with 
depression and/or anxious conditions such as phobias or panic 
disorder. This disabling illness can consume three to eight 
hours or more per day for those individuals that experience 
OCD. 

Good Shepherd Hospital's Behavioral Health Dept is spon- 
soring a free OCD education program for anyone who wants to 
obtain a better understanding of OCD and how it can be treat- 
ed. The program will be held on Monday, Nov. 18 from 7 to 9 
p.m. in the Lakeview-Prairie Rooms at the hospital. To register 
for the free OCD class, call -1(800)323-8622. 

Alzheimer's support meeting set 

The Lake County Health Dept., in cooperation with the 
Chicago Chapter of the Alzheimer's Assn., will sponsor a family 
support group meeting on Nov. 25 from 7 to 9 p.m., in room 112 
(lower level conference room) of the Lake County Health Dept., 
3010 Grand Ave., Waukegan. 

The meeting is designed for family members who care for 
Alzheimer's sufferers, and will include information on disease, 
specifics, current research, practical care techniques and com- 
munity resources. In addition, time will be provided for those in 
attendance to share their personal experiences in caring for 
people with Alzheimer's Disease. * 

The support group meeting is free. More information can be 
obtained by calling Sharon Roberts, Lake County Health Dept., 
at 360-6733. 

HNI joins thousands of providers 
in celebrating power of hospice 

The Hospice of Northeastern hospice care and advantages 



The Hospice of Northeastern 
Illinois.-Inc. (HNI), along with more 
than 2,000 agencies nationwide, 
joins the National Hospice 
Organization this November in cel- 
ebrating National Hospice Month. 
What is hospice? "The hospice 
caregiving team helps patients, as 
well as their families with one of the 
toughest transitions in life," said 
HNI Executive Director Jane Bilyeu. 
"Team focuses on the medical 
aspects of eliminating the physical 
pain associated with an illness as 
well as supplying the necessary 
psychological, spiritual and emo- 
tional support necessary to allow 
the patient and his family to con- 
centrate on living until death 
arrives." 

Hospice enables patients and 
their families to experience peace, 
comfort and caring at the end of 
life. This special intrinsic power, 
attributed solely to the hospice phi- 
losophy of care, embodies the 
theme for this year's National 
Hospice Month celebration. "The 
Power of Hospice: Peace, Comfort, 
Caring." 

Recognizing that each patient 
and family is different, hospice real- 
izes that the meaning of peace, 
comfort and caring to one family is 
not necessarily the same to anoth- 
er. Bilyeu added that a powerful 
component of hospice is that it 
offers each family unit an individu- 
alized plan of compassionate and 
comprehensive care, specially 
designed to meet particular levels 
of peace, comfort and caring. 

National Hospice Month pro- 
vides agencies with opportunities 
to promote public awareness about 



hospice care and advantages it 
offers. It also allows hospices to 
honor patients and families, as well 
as the thousands of dedicated pro- 
fessionals and volunteers who 
devote their time, love and support 
to the terminally ill and their fami- 
lies. In addition, it provides an 
opportunity for agencies to focus 
national attention on hospice 
issues. 

State Hospice Organization 
are co-hosting a free exhibit on the 
fourth floor of the Chicago Cultural 
Center, located at 78 E. Washington 
St. in downtown Chicago. 
"Hospice: A Photographic Inquiry" 
is a traveling exhibition investigat- 
ing the growing relevance of the 
hospice approach to health care 
through the work of five interna- 
tionally recognized photographers. 
The Hospice of Northeastern 
Illinois (HNI) is a not-for-profit, 
community based organization 
whose purpose is to support termi- 
nally ill patients and their families 
in western Lake and Cook 
Counties, as well as in Boone, 
DuPage, Kane and McHenry coun- 
ties. Hospice is dedicated to easing 
the emotional and physical pain 
that often accompanies terminal 
illness, ensuring a higher quality of 
living for both patients and their 
families. HNI, which has offices in 
Wheaton, Barrington and 
Woodstock, also offers educational 
programs, seminars, information 
and speakers to address a variety of 
issues. 

For additional information about 
hospice services, support groups, 
speakers and volunteer opportuni- 
ties, call (800) 425-4444. 



Condell honored for 70 years of service 

Gov. Jim Edgar declared Nov. 1 at Condell Medical Center Day in honor 
of their 70th anniversary, said Senator Adeline Geo'-Karis (R-Zion). 

"The governor's proclamation is a fitting tribute to the many contribu- 
tions Condell Medical Center has made to this community," said Geo- 
Karis. "We rely on daily medical facilities to provide for so many or our 
needs. Statewide recognition for 70 years of service in Lake County shows 
how important the efforts of a medical center like this are in Illinois." 

"I want to offer my heartfelt appreciation to the Condell Medical Center 
for its many years of service to die community," said Geo-Karis. "Over the 
years, Condell has undergone many changes and additions all of which 
have enhanced its service to Lake County. I hope this level of quality service 
continues for many more years." 



A Nutrition Research Study at 

Cancer Treatment Centers of America 

at Midwestern Regional Medical Center 



-omm;jn< 



Diet Modification and Breast Cancer: 

The Women's Intervention Nutrition Study 

(WINS) is recruiting 2,500 women to participate. 



You may be eligible if you: 

• Are age 48 to 78 

• Had surgery for localized invasive breast cancer in the past year 

• Take Tamoxifen (Nolvadex) or treated with chemotherapy or both 

The National Cancer Institute and the American Health Foundation are 
sponsors of the WINS study at cancer centers nationwide. This study 
will investigate whether or not changing what you eat plays a role in 
breast cancer recurrence. 

It's free to join. 

All women who qualify to participate will have their current diet analyzed 
by a nutritionist and will be randomly assigned to one of two diet groups. 
If you would like to find out whether or not you qualify for the study, 
please speak to your doctor or call Cancer Treatment Centers of America 
af Midwestern Regional Medical Center at 1-800-268-0786. 



Br- 
I' 



Midwestern w ^ 

ntu n*l h t. a i c * t cimi i 




CANCERj^^^CeSERS 



8 



O I A H I ( I C A 



2501 Emmnus Avenue Zion, Illinois 60099 
The cancer program at Midwestern is managed by Cancer Treatment Centers of America. 



All the cosmetics in the world can't d& 

what the MicroPeel can 



You can spend a lifetime trying to correct the 
appearance of your skin by covering it up. But 
modern technology has disovered the healthi- 
est, most effective way to better skin is to 
"uncover" it. 

Today that way is the MicroPeel. It's "the new peel" 

Developed by BioMedic Clinical Care, this 3-Step, 
twenty minute procedure gently, safely, effectively 
and painlessly rids the skin of its damaged, 
micro-thin top layer. And unlike the traditional, 
intense chemical peels, the MicroPeel can show 
improvement immediately. 




BIOMEDIC* 



cK> 





FAMILY MEDICINE SPECIALISTS 

MICROPEEL COUPON 

S*L CompCime.7ttary 9vCicro'Bee.C 

tvitfi any purcfiase of a 

t BioU\dedic procCuct. 



I 

■ OFFICE PHONE 

(847) 3S6-0700 
(847)526-2151 

Lm ■■ ^m R^p v^m w*m i^m ^m w^m 



^Ssapist*^ 1/31/V7 



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Call us for more information and a free brochure 
Contact Dr. Jennifer Jackson in Lake Villa, Illinois 

Call: 1-847-356-0700 or 1-847-526-2151 




m 



NbvEMblR 1 y f 1 996 UkElANd Newspapers HEALTHWATCH I . J 



* 



ii\ 



s 

1 



Health department offers 
immunization clinics 



The Lake County Health Dept. 
in conjunction with the Lake 
County Community Health 
Partnership, offers immunization 
clinics for Lake County children. 

Childhood immunization 
clinics will be held at the follow- 
ing locations and times, A parent 
or guardian must accompany all 
children. No appointments nec- 
essary: 

• Lake County Health Dept., 
Belvidere Medical Building, 2400 
Belvidere Rd., Waukegan, every 
Monday and Thursday from 1 to 
3 p.m. * Victory Memorial 
Hospital, 1324 N. Sheridan Rd., 
Waukegan, Nov. 19 from 9 to 11 
a.m. No appointment is neces- 
sary. Call 360-4127 for informa- 
tion. 

• VFW Post 4551, 75 N. Ave., 
Antioch, Nov. 20 from 9 to 1 1 a.m. 
Call 360-3114 for information. 

• North Chicago VA Medical 
Center, 3001 Green Bay Rd., Bldg. 
1, North Chicago, Nov. 26 from 4 
to 6 p.m. Call 578-3714 for further 
details. 

Aerobic 
instructor 
workshop set 

Has the thoughrever occurred 
to you, that you too, could become 
a great fitness instructor? 

If you love health and fitness, 
believe that you would be a great 
motivator, feel that you have that 
leadership ability, and most impor- 
tantly would like to help people 
become more committed to fit- 
ness — don't miss this workshop! 

Dance Pounds Away is host a 
'four-week instructor training work- 
shop in January on Saturdays from 
1 to3p.m 

If interested in signing up, 
enroll by Dec. 10. Workshop fees 
are $79. 

For further information, call 
662-2772. 

Diabetes— 

From page B8 

"Research is proving that we have 
the tools to prevent or delay the 
onset of the disease's complica- 
tions, such as blindness and 
amputation. But we need to get 
serious about diabetes, and seri- 
ous about treating it." 

Diabetes is a serious disease 
in which the body either does not 
produce insulin (Type I) or does 
not use insulin effectively or pro- 
duce adequate amounts of 
.insulin (Type II). Insulin is a hor- 
'mone that allows blood sugar to 
enter the cells of the body and be 
used for energy. Diabetes can 
lead to severely debilitating or 
fatal complications, such as 
blindness, kidney disease, heart 
disease, stroke, and amputations. 
It is the fourth-leading cause of 
death b y disease in the U.S. 
Currently, there is no cure. 

The mission of the American 
Diabetes Association is to pre- 
vent and cure diabetes and to 
improve the lives of all people 
affected by diabetes. As the 
nation's leading voluntary health 
organization supporting diabetes 
research, information, and advo- 
cacy, the Association provides a 
variety of community programs, 
publications, and services to help 
people live happier and healthier 
lives. For information on com- 
munity events or to receive a free 
brochure from the American 
Diabetes Association, call (312) 
346-1805 or l-(800)-DIABETES 
(l-(800) 342-2383). 



• St. Therese Medical Center, 
2615 Washington St., Waukegan, 
Nov. 27 from 4 to 6 p.m. Call 249- 
3900 for further information. 

• Highland Park Hospital, 718 
Glenview Ave., Highland Park, 
Nov. 22 from 9 to 11 a.m. Call 
432-8000 for details. 

• Lake Forest Hospital, 900 
Medical Building, 660 
Westmoreland, Lake Forest, Nov. 
23 from 9 to 11 a.m. Call 234-5600 
for further information. 

At the clinics, children can be 
immunized against polio, diph- 
theria, tetanus, whooping cough 
(DPT), measles, mumps, rubella 
(German measles), and 
Haemophilus influenza, type B 
(HIB). 

Parents are asked to bring 
their children's past immuniza- 
tion records. If a child has an 
immunization letter from a 
school nurse, it should also be 
brought to the session. 

For more information, call the 
Lake County Health Dept. 
Communicable Disease Program 
at, 360-6761. 




At your service 

Lake County Board Chairman Bob Depke helps Board of Health President Colin McRae, Health 
Center Executive Director Dale Gallassie and other health department officials cut the ribbon 
officially opening the newly renovated Lake County Community Health Center in Waukegan. 
The expansions will enable the center to provide service to hundreds more patients each 
year. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 







^^^^^onstructive surgery 
^^^fP cancer patients: 

Blending traditional medical treatment 
with, nutrition, mind-body medicine, 
'"■ spiritual and psychological support is what 
makes the Cancer Treatment Centers of 
America program at Midwestern Regional 
■Medical Center different from many other 
treatment programs. 

<AnUhow 7 another facet 
has been added. 

Illl^ team of board-certified plastic and 
reconstructive surgeons work together 









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■■■ ■ ■ ■■'■■•i.^.'W^ v«Sk 



with our surgical oncologists to 
provide consultation and assessment 
prior to a patient's cancer surgery. 
Many times the plastic surgeons 
perform their restorative procedures 
immediately following or at the same 
time as the cancer surgery. 



w the body, 
and soul. 




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iiuhu. umcu crMii 



(I I i h t r I ■ \ 



Toll free 800^683^8795 

2501 Emmaus Avenue^ Zion^lL 60099 
Visit our home page on the worldvwide \veb: 
. http:/Avw\s'.cancercenter.com 



This approach many times eliminates the 
need for additional surgeries, and spares 
many patients from the physical and 
emotional stress caused by the results of 
some cancer surgeries. 

Procedures performed by the surgeons 
include restoration and reconstruction 
of the breast, face and neck, and many 
other areas. 

If you or someone you love is considering 
cancer surgery, please have your doctor 
call us or call us yourself and find out 
what a difference caring for the body, 
mind and soul really makes. 



A'o case is typical. You should not 
expect to experience these results. 



-. _« ,. ~"~.~*J*. 



" 










HOT SPOTS LAkElANd Newspapers Novemdeic 1 5, 1996 




Eating and meeting 
in the Lakeland area 




f china 




The Finest in Mandarin and Szechwan Cuisine 

Elegant Dining with a Casual Atmosphere 





Hoocma ? 



ffl 



5572 Grand Ave., Gurnee, IL 60031 
Phone (847) 662-2929 • Fax (847) 662-6099 




Dinner 'til 10:OOp.m. Closed yyctis : } 

oo Choo's Fish ^"*B-y'- ; 
<Z!s»*» Eat Fri. 4-9:30 - SSS_«>3 

■M&SBKS^T ■■■■•- 



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IN THE MANSION 

FULL 7 COURSE THANKSGIVING DINNERS 
•Roast Turkey • Leg of Lamb • Baked Ham 

[ Or order jrom our regular menu \ 






I IN OUR BANQUET FACILITY 

Groups of 6 or more only! 

WE CARVE THE BIRD FOR Y0V/Y0V CARVE THE BIRD V0URSELF 

Call for more Information and reservations 

We'll slice and carve the bird in our kitrhen or carve it youtsclT ai your table. 

Vour itfrlgcraior doesn't go liunery cither • all the leftovers arc 

carefully packed to take home. 



vft]-j ■ All dishes iarji^^^^^^^^^^^ 
elegant ambhimc^ofKjj^^ 

pajl^Tem^ 

, extensive wine list. Imported and "g= 
; micro beelrv^Stop by Monday^" 



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■s 



Casual Attire - Special Children s Prices 

Ooscd 

Monday 



^'Country ^cjuirE 

firftaurant & JBnnqutt /atilitir* 
Gracioui dining In the Wesley Sean Country Estate 

Rts. 120 and 45-Grayslakc*(847)223-012l 
Your Hosts. Dill and Kris Govas 



I 

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Wild 

Goose 

Cafe 



Hawthorn 
xWoods 



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ADVERTISEMENT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Triple 3 Steak House 



Location: 

On Rte. 83, just north 
of Antioch, in Trevor, 
Wis. 

Telephone: 

(414)862-9886 

Hours: 

From 4 to 9 p.m., 
weekdays and from 
4 to 10 p.m. on 
weekends. 

Menu: 

The best steaks in the 
area, prime rib buffet, 
Friday Fish Fry - AYCE, 
chicken and rib combo 
- Sunday brunch to 
come! 




It's the Triple 3 for 
those who like to eat! 

For those who love to eat good hardy food, 
served in an attractive southwestern atmos- 
phere by a knowledgeable staff that swears by 
fast quality service, the Triple J Steak House is 
the place to go. 

The Triple J, located on Rte. 83, just north of 
Antioch, in Trevor, Wis., is family owned and 
operated by Mike and Marie Jonas and Mike 
Jonas, Jr. 

For steak connoisseurs, the Triple J serves only 
certified angus beef, which means that this is the 



place for the best steaks in two states. 

Other satisfying all-you-can-eat specials 
include the new prime rib buffet featured from 4 
p.m. on Saturday. This includes al least two other 
entrees, and a salad bar for $15.98. 

Monday's special is a chicken and rib combo 
for $8.98. The restaurant is closed on Tuesdays, 
and on Thursday, try the pasta bar filled with a 
variety of tasty pasta dishes with three different 
sauces, also all-you-can-eat, for $8.25. Don't for- 
get our country line dancing, every Thursday from 
7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Come join the fun! 

The Friday night all-you-can eat fish fry fea- 
tures delicious flaky haddock. Try our Friday Early 
Bird Special al $5.95. 

Chef Rick Starr also wants you to tease your 
taste buds with the gorgeous and delicious deep 
fried onion bloom, the best appetizer in town. 
With the holidays approaching, the Triple J 
suggests the perfect gift, a gift certificate for dinner 
aUhe Triple J. The holidays also means seasonal 
parlies. The sleak house is already taking reserva- 
tions for that special holiday party with banquet 
accommodations for groups of 20 to 1 00. 

The Triple J is open every day except Tuesday 
from 4 p.m. on. Call (414)862-9886 for reserva- 
tions or more information. 



E5E 3 



Hawthorn Wopys**i\ v 

949*5550 

Lunch: Mon^thruiFn.^/^e^ 
Dinner 7 bay>\.vy^^?^v 



NovEMbER 15, 1996 LAkEiANd Newspapers HOT SPOTS [ 




WILD GOOSE CAFE, Gilmer R 0a d 
Hawthorn Woods, 949-5550. for 4 
years, Wild Goose Cafe has been Lake 
County's best kept secret.. Anna and Jeff 
would personally like to invite you to 
come out and try our unique gourmet ere- 
ations. Centrally located in Lake County.,, 
All roads lead to Wild Goose Cafe 



BAKERIES 



SOMETHINGS BREWING, 36 S. 
Whitney Street, Downtown 
Grayslake, 548-4600. Fresh baked 
pastries, all occasion decorated cakes, 
handmade chocolates, espresso/coffee 
bar, bulk beans, gourmet sandwiches, 
homemade salads, soups, hand sliced 
deli meat and cheeses. Gift baskets, gift 
certificates. 1 6 flavors of premium hand- 
dipped ice cream. Outdoor cafe. 
Somethings Brewing is open Sunday 
through Thursday from 5:30 a.m. to 9 
p.m.; Friday and Saturday until 10 p.m. J 



FINE DINING 



STONEGATE TAVERN & GRILL, 

500 Ela Road, Lake Zurich, 438- 
4900. Stonegate Tavern & Grill is all 
new - with new management, chef and 
enticing menu. Dine in an Olde English 
atmosphere next to a magnificent open 
hearth. Try steaks, seafood, chicken, 
ribs and more prepared in Stonegate's 
own special way. American cuisine at 
it's finest. Open Monday through 
Thursday from 1 1 a.m. to 10 p.m.; 
Friday and Saturday from 1 1 a.m. to 11 
p.m.; and Sunday from* 4 to 9 p.m . $$$ 



OWNERSHIP 



Loon Lake 

jrtf ril t.'I ''•' 

Resort 

on Lambert Drive off of 

Grass Lake Rd. and Route 83 

- On Beautiful Loon Lake 

838-LOON 

(5666) 

Free Food 

During Bears 

Games 




• Sandwiches 

• Ice Fishing 
• Boat Rentals 

• Camp Fires 
Picnic Area Rental 

Call for Details 



Thanksgiving Buffe 

11:00-9:00 

ui ,ii.J- CuU for Reservations 

'Adults} $'1-2.95: Children 1-9: $6.95 





Call Tor Holiday Parlies 

Banquets & Catering 

Gift Certificates • Carry-Out 

217 N. Front St. 
I mite South of 1 20 on 3 1 . Mcllcnry 

'A 



**&* POLI! 



Qxr$4*W t Hv\v\ 



POU5M-AMEBICAN DUFFET 

(815) 344-0330 






in t' lC 
Co un«y 




TRIPLE J 



S TE A K HOUSE 









Located On Rl. 83 1/2 Mile North Of Anlioch 

414-862-9886 

Open Daily At 4 P-M. - C I Dsed Tuesday 
Book Your Private Parties Or Buslnoss Lunch Up To 100 Nowl 

MONDAY: Chicken & Ribs A// You Can Eat $8.95 

THURSDAY: Pasta liar All You Can Fat $8.25 jl 

13 Different Sauces Sauieed With Choices Oudcn, Stump, Italian Sausage, Clams & Fresh Veggies) _ = I 

FRIDAY: Haddock Pish Fry Alt You Can Eat $7.95 ^ 

Early Bird Special 4 - 6 „ '. $5.95 

Coming Soon: Sunday Brunch & Prime Rib Buffet 



CERTIFIED ANGUS BEEF™ PRIME RIB SATURDAY 

Homemade Bread, Soup And Salad Dressings 

"We Have The Ever Popular ... 

ONION BLOOM" - Also - 1 Lb. Lobster Tail 



, ^ _ a Aii— *-~-«vV- 



ZZATSE 



*76& SiM ^oHcUmm 



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Roasted Chicken 
Hoi & Sour Pickles 
Egfi Rolls 
Fresh Fniil 



Sottps: 

• Hot and Sour Soup 

• Egg Drop Soup 



Appetizers: 

• Coid Beef 

• Pork w/Garlic Sauce 

• Polalo Salad 

• Crab Rangoon 

Entrees: 

• Combination Fried Rice 

• Combination Lo Mein 

• Twice Cooked Duck 

• Chicken Chop Suey 
■ Shrimp & Vegetables 

• Gnrlic Chicken . , „ 

Lunch Specials Start at $3.75 

4 EAST PHILLIP IU>., VERtfON HILLS 

600-1760 (On Rto. 60 - 3/4 Mi. VV. of Milwaukee Avo.) 

Reservations Recommended • Open 7 Days 



■ Sautecd SlringBcans 

• Beef w/Droccoli 

• Fried Zucchini 

' Sweet & Sour Chicken 
'HunniiFish 



ADVERTISEMENT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Long Sing 



Location: 

1333 Delaney Rd., 
Gurnee 

Telephone: 

(847) 599-8278 

Fax - (847) 599-8366 

Hours: 

From 1 1 a.m. to 9 
p.m., Sun. through 
Thurs., and on Fri. and 
Sat., from 1 1 a.m. to 
10 p.m. 

Menu: 

The finest and most 
unusual Cantonese, 
Mandarin and 
Szechwan cuisine, as 
well as all the 
traditional favorites. 




Long Sing, a relaxing, 
delicious dining experience 

There's a new Chinese restaurant in town and 
everything about it is very special. The Long Sing 
Restaurant is owned by Thanh Mac, a chef who is 
a cut above the average, and his wife Cam, who 
are proud of one the most attractive restaurants in 

the area 

Mac has over 1 5 years experience in cooking 
tasty Cantonese, Mandarin and Szechwan cuisine 
with that gentle touch that makes delectable dishes. 

Thanh was part of a five star team of chefs at 
the Hyatt Regency in Water Tower Place, Chicago, 
and a legion of Lake and Cook County customers 
joined his culinary fan club when he owned the 
Wah Yee Restaurant in Evanston and the Four, Five 



and Six Restaurant in Waukegan. 

The new Long Sing Restaurant, located at 1333 
Delaney Rd. in Gurnee, specializes in delicious 
dishes such as Silver Shrimp, Twin Flavor Shrimp, 
Triple Delight^ Crabmeat Rangoon, Jade Sweet 
Prawns orTeriyaki Beef, and much, much more. 

For customers who have certain dietary restric- 
tions, the chef will give their order individual atten- 
tion such as deleting the salt for guests with high 
blood pressure, watching the fat and calories in 
dishes for dieters, and eliminating the MSG for • 
those allergic to it. just ask! 

The Long Sing's warm and polite staff is well 
versed in the menu selections and they will be sure to 
keep your tea cup steaming hot and filled to the brim. 
Long Sing's features a different luncheon special 
every day for $4.35*, which is usually more than 
one hungry bear could eat. Dinner is also served 
family style, bringing diners a taste of more than 
one entree besides an appetizer and soup. 

The Long Sing Restaurant can seat up to 400 
people banquet-style in the exotic Asian atmos- 
phere that prevails both in the upstairs and down- 
stairs dining rooms, with each having its own bar. 
Right now, reservations for holiday parties are 
being taken. Call (847)599-8278 or fax (847)599- 
8366 for your carryout order or reservations. 
We look forward to meeting you. 
Regular restaurant hours are from 1 1 a.m. to 9 
p.m., Sun. through Thurs., and from 11 a.m. to 10 
p.m. on Fri. and Sat. 






W 



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WEDNESDAY. 
5:00*00 

ITALIANO FESTIVAL BUFFET^ 
PIZZA PASTA & SALAD 
i AdulU • J4.95 ChHdren Under 10.. 
$L95lnHlGhOulr 



Waterfalls 

Banquet & Buffet J 

THURSDAY 

INTERNATIONAL BUFFET: $7.95 

FRIDAY 

•• SEAFOOD BUFFET: $7.95 

:: 'SATURDAY * 

PRIME RIB BUFFET: $12.95 

SUNDAY 

CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH: $8.95 

Special Prices (or Childten 

715 W. Rte. 173 

Antioch 

(847) 395-2212 

Call for Resetvatlons 



NOW 
OPEN 

daily $>I35 * 

LUNCH only &%. ^ 

$ P t Km I A^ L S Includes entree, cggroll, .^ 

fried rice, soup fj&i 



B00KY0UR HOLIDAY PARTY NOW! UPT0 400 PEOPLE 



FAST CARRY-OLJT SERVICE OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FOR LUNCH & DINNER ^C 



(847) 599-8278 



fPfl 



^7 




On Any Birthday Party 

Booked In Our New 
Non-Smoking Party Room 

(Present this ad wfien booking 

All Birthday Parties Receive: 

• Games • Bowling • Pizza • Soda • Ice Cream 
Prize Wheel Spin for Birthday Person 

Starting at | Returning Nov. 16th: Our Saturday Birthday 
Parties Will Feature "Magic Dave" at 2 pm 





1333 Delany Rd. 

!Blk.N.of41 



^ryiywv;; 1 ^ ^ . 



GURNEE 



■i-MMm^H>^H^ii.mrSB^tiS«U-a^^. ■■: 



HL-AU..M«V& a jammmm, 



per person 



•HUH 



^.Ti^1JI!yjM»1l-^Jt«lllJ;l!l^Jk'<;^iM»)^"d»iy>iij 
Fall Hours: Mon.-Fri. open at 3:00 pm;Sat-Sun. open at 10:00 am 
% (847)546-2512 42 1 W. Rollins Rd„ Round Lake Beach 



mi cAAa/ico .s 



Rated ++* 1/2 



^tU/la/tco'g 



FRIDAYS: SATURDAY'S:! 

Crab Legs nobs S5L^ 

AHYbuCaniat ^^P^ 

1 Lobster Tail * 
i Complete Dinner $16.95 

or Create Your Own Meal 



Make Your Reservations Now! 

I CHRISTMAS DINNER. SHOW 

Sal., December 7 at IO pm 

Special Guests Irish Shacfer 6' lolm Ttwlcn 



Ifr^pet 



We Are New, 
Looking lo Meet You! 

where Are vouf ?? 

• Live Music 
& Dancing 

Every Fri. & Sat. Night 

• Lower Level 

Dance Floor 

and 2nd Bar Area 

Football ^ 

Sunday: Free Snacks All Day 
Free Food from I pm - 5 pm 

Bloody Mary Specials 
FREE PoolTablesAlt Day Sunday 




"Ifat tyn&it Place 

22S E. Main SL, Round Lake Park 
740-4625 



MONDAY: Free Snacks 

ALL DOMESTIC BEERS $1.00 

ALL IMPORT BEERS SL2S 



FEATURING 
Friday & Saturday, Nov. 15 & 16 

"THETRASHMEN" 

10:00 pm- 2:00 am 

COME IN AND MEET US AFTER WORK OR 
ANYTIME FOR GOOD FUN AND COMPANY 

New Hours: 



BSE 



N 



S3 
120 



45 



M-Th 2 pm-midnlght?? 

Fri. 2pm.3 am 

Sat. noon -3 a.m. 

Sun. 11 a.m. -midnight?? 



883 Main St., Antioch 
(847)395-8883 



POOL PARH R00MAVAILAB1I UPT0 ISO 

GAMES SUN.THRU.THURS. 

_.._,___ a Widlccupoi per pera peril*. Eipres N/3Q% , 

PIZZA BOOK TOUR OFFICE OR HOLIDAY PARTY NOW L-31-1L--J 



COUPON 



I "mSSmUmLmmmmmT LLf 71 

1 FREE 
I BEVERAGE 

(Your Choice) 
Up to $4.00 value 



- 



^" • '•"5 3 °!*: ' ^ 



*HB 



•mJWj- 



SH HOT SPOTS UkElANd Newspapers November 15, 1996 





Eating and meeting 
in the Lakeland area 



The Finest in Mandarin and Szechwan Cuisine 

Elegant Dining with a Casual Atmosphere 




'-1 



5572 Grand Ave., Gurnee, IL 60031 
Phone (847) 662-2929 • Fax (847) 662-6099 





For 4 



m 



the "Best Kept Secret in M 

Re(gidn/il liiliitemsi 



IN THE MANSION 

FULL 7 COURSE THANKSGIVING DINNERS 
•Roast Turkey • Leg of Lamb • Baked Ham 

1 Or order from our regular menu \ 



IN OUR BANQUET FACILITY 

Croups of 6 or more only! 

WE CARVE THE BIRD FOR TOU/VOU CARVE THE BIRD YOURSELF 

CaJI for more Information and reservations 

We'll slice and carve the bird in our kitchen or carve il yourself at your table. 

Your refrigerator doesn't go hungry cither - all the leftovers are 

carefully packed to take home. 




Si 



Velegantambianc^btr^^ 

M9m$$9®& regional en trj* 

\ ; extensive .wine list. vfmporteaar 

micro beer.; Stop by Monday 

^ ^ esd ^^^*esday and enjq 

■'"" ■ ..." ^vjv 

m 



Gwwfl/ Hmre - 5/wna/ Children 's Prices 

Monday 



myt Country Squire 

Acftauranl & JBnnqurt ;f nu'lilir* 
Groclout aiming in the XFettry Seat? Country Eslatr 



Rts. l20and45-Grayslake«(B47)223-0121 
Your Hosts, BUI and Kris Govas 






y^vhimffi[?/& 



1 On Gilmer Road, East of -Midlot 115 
Hawthorn ; .Wboq$w!\ 

94945550 

Lunch: Mon; thru.Fri.-i 
J Dinner 7 Days A Week. : ''f;\ 






ADVHRTISHMtNT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Triple J Steak House 



Location: 

On Rte. 83, just north 
of Antioch, in Trevor, 
Wis. 

Telephone: 

(414)862-9886 

Hours: 

From 4 to 9 p.m., 
weekdays and from 
4 to 1 p.m. on 
weekends. 

Menu: 

The best steaks in the 
area, prime rib buffet, 
Friday Fish Fry - AYCE, 
chicken and rib combo 
- Sunday brunch to 
cornel 




It's the Triple D for 
those who like to eat! 

For those who love to eat good hardy food, 
served in an attractive southwestern atmos- 
phere by a knowledgeable staff that swears by 
fast quality service, the Triple J Steak House is 
the place to go. 

The Triple J, located on Rte. 83, just north of 
Antioch, in Trevor, Wis., is family owned and 
operated by Mike and Marie Jonas and Mike 
Jonas, Jr. 

For steak connoisseurs, the Triple J serves only 
certified angus beef, which means that this is the 



place for the best steaks in two states. 

Other satisfying all-you-can-eat specials 
include the new prime rib buffet featured from 4 
p.m. on Saturday. This includes at least two other 
entrees, and a salad bar for $15.98. 

Monday's special is a chicken and rib combo 
for $8.98. The restaurant is closed on Tuesdays, 
and on Thursday, try the pasta bar filled with a 
variety of tasty pasta dishes with three different 
sauces, also all-you-can-eat, for $8.25. Don't for- 
get our country line dancing, every Thursday from 
7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Come join the fun! 

The Friday night all-you-can eat fish fry fea- 
tures delicious flaky haddock. Try our Friday Early 
Bird Special at $5.95. 

Chef Rick Starr also wants you to lease your 
taste buds with the gorgeous and delicious deep 
fried onion bloom, the best appetizer in town. 
With the holidays approaching, the Triple J 
suggests the perfect gift, a gift certificate for dinner 
aHhe Triple J. The holidays also means seasonal 
parties. The steak house is already taking reserva- 
tions for that special holiday parly with banquet 
accommodations for groups of 20 to 100. 

The Triple J is open every day except Tuesday 
from 4 p.m. on. Call (414)862-9806 for reserva- 
tions or more information. 




WILD GOOSE CAFE, Gilmer Road, 
Hawthorn Woods, 949-5550. For 4 
years, Wild Goose Cafe has been Lake 
County's best kept secrgt^nna and Jeff 
would personally like to invite you to 
come out and try our unique gourmet cre- 
ations. Centrally located in Lake County. 
All roads lead to Wild Goose Cafe. 



NovEMben 15, 1996 UkelANd Newspapers HOT SPOTS 




BAKERIES 



SOMETHINGS BREWING, 36 S. 
Whitney Street, Downtown 
Grayslake, 548-4600. Fresh baked 
pastries, all occasion decorated cakes, 
handmade chocolates, espresso/coffee 
bar, bulk beans, gourmet sandwiches, 
homemade salads, soups, hand sliced 
deli meat and cheeses. Gift baskets, gift 
certificates. 1 6 flavors of premium hand- 
dipped ice cream. Outdoor cafe. 
Somethings Brewing is open Sunday 
through Thursday from 5:30 a.m. to 9 
p.m.; Friday and Saturday until 10 p.m. $ 



FINE DINING 



STONEGATE TAVERN & GRILL, 

500 Ela Road, Lake Zurich, 438- 
4900. Stonegale Tavern & Grill is all 
new- with new management, chef and 
enticing menu. Dine in an Olde English 
atmosphere next to a magnificent open 
hearth. Try steaks, seafood, chicken, 
ribs and more prepared in Stonegale's 
own special way. American cuisine at 
it's finest. Open Monday through 
Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; 
Friday and Saturday from 1 1 a.m. to 11 
p.m.; and Sunday fronr4 to 9 p.m . $$$ 



■ »m ruioj 



loJil 



OWNERSHIP 



Lake 

i . 

Resort 

on Lambert Drive off of 

Grass Lake Rd. and Route 83 

- On Beautiful Loon Lake 

838-LOON 

(5666) 

Free Food 

During Bears 

Games 

WEDNESDAYS 

75* 

Draft Beer 




• Sandwiches 

• Ice Fishing 
• Boat Rentals 

• Camp Fires 
Picnic Area Rental 

Call for Details 



jP^vtyr *Msp6ij With «|}§! 



Thanksgiving Buffet 





11:00-9:00 

<=uit for Reservations 

$12.95: Children 4-9: $6.95 

Call for Holiday Parlies 

Banquets & Catering 

GUI Certificates » Carry-Out 

2 1 7 N. Front St. 

1 mile South of 1 20 on 1 1 . McHcnry 



#^ 



^SjP POLI! 



43Vr5^W,NV*V\ 



£ 



POLISH-AMERICAN BUFFET 

(815) 344-0330 



Gi<f a t 




^rv 



vyr 



^nr 



TRIPLE J 




/& 



*& 



9«/j 



e n> e 



Located On Rt. 83 1/2 Mile North Of Antioch Ccr//A 

3S» 414-862-9886 <%$* 

c Open Daily At 4 P.M. ■ Closed Tuesday v 

Book Your Private Parlies Or Business Lunch Up To 1O0 Nowl 

MONDAY: Chicken fit Ribs All You Can Eat $8.95 

THURSDAY: Pasta Bar Afl >'"« Can Eat $8.25 

a Ditlercnl Sauces, Sauleed With Choices Odcn. Shrimp. iiaUsn Sausage, Clams & Fresh toggles} 

FRIDAY: Haddock Fish Fry All You Can Eat $7.95 

Early Bird Special 4 - 6 $5.95 

Comfng Soon: Sunday Brunch & Prime Rib Buffet 




CERTIFIED ANGUS BEEF™ PRIME RIB SATURDAY 

Homemade Bread, Soup And Salad Dressings 

"We Have The Ever Popular ... 

ONION BLOOM" - Also - 1 Lb. Lobster Tail 



aJVv— ^-*-^MI 



-JV/A— — 



76e ScM W<md<vuH 



ft%r* 



^ ■ wmmm 

IMNGHBUFFEr 



mm 




Roasted Chicken 
Hot & Sour Tickles 
Egj? Rolls 
Fresh Fruit 



Soups: 

• Hot and Sour Soup 
■ Egg Drop Soup 



Appetizers: 
■ Cold Beef 

• Pork w/Garlic Sauce 

• Potato Salad 

• Crab Rangoon 

Entrees: 

• Combination Fried Rice 

• Combination Lo Mein 

• Twice Cooked Duck 

• Chicken Chop Suey 

• Shrimp & Vegetables 

• Garlic Chicken . , „ 

Lunch Special* Start at $3.75 

4 EAST PHIlt-ir i;D-, VERNON MILLS 

600-1760 (On Rto. 60 - 3/4 Mi, W. d{ Milwaukee Avo.) 

Reservations Recommended • Open 7 Days 



• Saulced String Beans ! 
■ Bed w/rjroccoli 

• Fried Zucchini 

• Sweet & Sour Chicken 

• Hunan Rsh 



ADVERTISEMENT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Long Sing 



Location: 

1333 DelaneyRd., 
Gurnee 

Telephone: 

(847) 599-8278 

Fax - (847) 599-8366 

Hours: 

From 1 1 a.m. to 9 
p.m., Sun. through 
Thurs., and on Fri. and 
Sat., from 1 1 a.m. to 
10 p.m. 

Menu: 

The finest and most 
unusual Cantonese, 
Mandarin and 
Szechwan cuisine, as 
well as all the 
traditional favorites. 





Long Sing, a relaxing, 
delicious dining experience 

There's a new Chinese restaurant in town and 
everything about it is very special. The Long Sing 
Restaurant is owned by Thanh Mac, a chef who is 
a cut above the average, and his wife Cam, who 
are proud of one the most attractive restaurants in 
the area 

Mac has over 1 5 years experience in cooking 
tasty Cantonese, Mandarin and Szechwan cuisine 
with that gentle touch that makes delectable dishes. 

Thanh was part of a five star team of chefs at 
the Hyatt Regency in Water Tower Place, Chicago, 
and a legion of Lake and Cook County customers 
joined his culinary fan club when he owned the 
Wah Yee Restaurant in Evanston and the Four, Five 



and Six Restaurant in Waukegan. 

The new Long Sing Restaurant, located at 1333 
Delaney Rd. in Gurnee, specializes in delicious 
dishes such as Silver Shrimp, Twin Flavor Shrimp, 
Triple Delight; Crabmeat Rangoon, Jade Sweet 
Prawns orTeriyaki Beef, and much, much more. 

For customers who have certain dietary restric- 
tions, the chef will give their order individual atten- 
tion such as deleting the salt for guests with high 
blood pressure, watching the fat and calories in 
dishes for dieters, and eliminating the MSG for 
those allergic to it. Just ask! 

The Long Sing's warm and polite staff is well 
versed in the menu selections and they will be sure to 
keep your tea cup steaming hot and filled to the brim. 
Long Sing's features a different luncheon special 
every day for $4.35, which is usually more than 
one hungry bear could eat. Dinner is also served 
family style, bringing diners a taste of more than 
one entree besides an appetizer and soup. 

The Long Sing Restaurant can seat up to 400 
people banquet-style in the exotic Asian atmos- 
phere that prevails both in the upstairs and down- 
stairs dining rooms, with each having its own bar. 
Right now, reservations for holiday parties are 
being taken. Call (847)599-8278 or fax (847)599- 
8366 for your carryout order or reservations. 
We look forward to meeting you. 
Regular restaurant hours are from 1 1 a.m. to 9 
p.m., Sun. through Thurs., and from 1 1 a.m. to 10 
p.m. on Fri. and Sat. 



fflHIS 



Waterfalls 

Banquet & Buffet •* 

THURSDAY 

INTERNATIONAL BUFFET: $7.95 

FRIDAY 

SEAFOOD BUFFET; $7.95 

-SATURDAY * 

PRIME RfB BUFFET: $12.95 

SUNDAY 

CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH: $8.95 

Special Prices lor Children 

715 W. Rte. IT3 
Antioch 

(847) 395-2212 

Call lor Reservations 



?~®Z 



NOW 
OPEN 

long mm RcsraujUNT 

DAILY $>f 35 

LUNCH only 

SPECIALS 



4 



Includes entree, eggroll, 
fried rice, soup 



BOOK YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY NOW! UPT0 400 PEOPLE 



FAST CARRY-OUT SERVICE OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FOR LUNCH &D1NNER 



1333DelanyRd. 

!Blk.N.of41 



(847) 599-8278 

fax 599-8566 



GURNEE 





io % 



On Any Birthday Party 

Booked In Our New 
Non-Smoking Parcy Room 

(Prtstnt ifiis ad wfien booking} 

&_^Vf\l* 1 ' A || Birthday Parties Receive: 

[•(2. . Games • Bowling • Pizza • Soda ■ Ice Cream 
Prize Wheel Spin for Birthday Person 

Starting at | Returning Nov. 1 6th: Our Saturday Birthday 
Parties Will Feature "Magic Dave" at 2 pm 




per person 




STOP IN AND SEE OUR NEWLY REMODELED LOUNGE 



:/— ir Fall Hours: Mon.-Fd. open at 3:00 pm;Sat.-Sun. open at 10:00 am /^v 
(847) 546-25 I 2 42l W.Rollins Rd.. Round Lake Beach 





9 



4)1 cAAa/tco 2 



PI?! 2 .q)l O/la/tco's 

FRIDAYS: SATURDAYS: 

Crab Legs 1 lobster M- ■& 

AHVtouCanlat ^P^ 

. 1 Lobster Tail 

"Complete Dinner $16.95 
or Create Your Own Meal 



Make Your Reservations Now! 

| CI IR.ISTMAS DINNER SHOW 

Sftt., December 7 nt IO pm 

S[x;eial Quests 'Irish Shacfor &' Mm Tlmkin 



883 Main St., Antioch 
(847) 395-8883 







"l/tat fyneat Place 

225 E. Main St., Round Lake Park 

740-4625 



FEATURING 
Friday & Saturday, Nov. 15 & 16 

"THETRASHMEN" 

10:00 pm -2:00 am 

COME IN AND MEET US AFTER WORK OR 
ANYTIME FOR GOOD FUN AND COMPANY 

Hew Hours: 



i$n 



N 



83 
120 



45 



M-Th 2 pm-tnidnight?? 

Fri. 2pm-3 am 

Sat. noon-3 a.m. 

Sun. 11 a.m. -midnight?? 



COUPON 



LLNl 

1 FREE ■ 



POOL party ROOM AVAILABLE UPT0 ISO 

GAMES SUN.THRULTHURS. 

PIZZA BOCKYOUROFFinOaHOUDAmRTYNOW iS^TSSSSSXSS^i 



I 

! beyerage! 

I (Your Choice) \ 

Up to S4.00 value 



[ we Are New, 
I Looking To Meet You! 

Where Are You??? 

f~ ft *\ • Live Music 

& Dancing 

Every Fri. & Sat. Night 

• Lower Level 

Dance Floor 

and 2nd Bar Area 

Football <Q^| 

Sunday: Free Snacks All Day 
Free Food from I pm - S pm 

Bloody Mary Specials 
FREE Pool Tables AH Day Sunday 

MONDAY: Free Snacks 

ALL DOMESTIC BEERS SI. 00 

ALL IMPORT BEERS $1.25 




HOT SPOTS UIceUncI Newspapers NoveMbtn 15, 1996 




Eating and 
meeting in the 
Lakeland area 



"I cook 
with beer. 

Sometimes 
I even put it 
in the Food!" 

Steve, Chef 



Experience fresh brewed 

beer and great steaks, 

ribs and seafood at the 

Midwest's First Brewpub, 



Brewmasters 

Restaurant & Pub 

Where even the Beer is 
Homemade. ■••'■"■ 



401780th St Kenosha, 
Wisconsin 414-694-9050 

1170-22nd Ave. 
(Parkside) 414-552-2805 







313 E. LIBERTY 
WAUCONDA 



NIGHTLY SPECIALS - 

Alaskan King Crab Legs, 1 lb. - $15,95 

Shrimp Specials - $10.95 

Your Choice: Shrimp Alfredo, Shrimp 

Scampi, Shrimp Diavalo, or Beer Battered Shrimp. 

THANKSGIVING BUFFET 

From 11:30 am - 8:00 pm 

$ 11 95 Adults, $ 5 95 Kids 

Regular Menu Also Available 




(847) 526-6905 

- Overlooking Beautiful Bangs Lake - 



V* 



Hickory Knoll Cafe 8 Pub 

Located at The Golf Farm in Wauconda 
EXPRESS LUNCH: Monday-Friday 11-2; $5.95 

A bonafide musical mecca of jazz, blues, standards, pop, 

improv, and great funky tunes performed by our 

professional musical ensemble. Featuring; 

T.S. Henry Webb - Brass & Keyboard; 

T. Will Fejer - Keyboard Arranger; 

and a host of other wide-ranging talents, join us for 

cocktails or dinner, and listen to the £ 

'Best Live Music in Lake County' with NO COVER! * 

> Located on Rte. 12 at Case Rd., (M7\ AQ7 OQQfl * 

^2mi. South of 120, 2 mi. North of 176 \0t7J lO/ m Ljj\j*£ 

^** ^^ ^^ ^^^ tor to^ t ^t fc^ to^ fc '^f ^tf^ ^V^ ^^^ ^r %. ^f^ *^r ^^^ ^^^ ^tf^ ^r^ ^^ ^k^ ^^^^ %F ^T ^r^ '^r 




J 



JRoast ^tuffcii tEurUcy, 13.95 
■JRoast $rhnc JRib of JUlccf 16-95 

(Erispv> ^laast jphicU 16.95 

^Unltctt ^Untitle JSalman 16.95 

jjReBcrbiitiaiiB ^cccptcb 12:00 — 7:00 pm 

aUjitbrcn 7.95 
3035 BELVIDERE STREET • WAUKEGAN, IL • (847) 336-0222 



get them £*t C-AKZl 

C-eleknte yout UtthdAy At the Mam and » q 
the d-akt Is on us... 

(tesetvAtlohs a necessity!) 

THE BARN OF BARRINGTON RESTAURANT 

847.381.8585 

1415 S BARRINGTON RD (JUST NORTH OF DUNDEE RD) 



- ~ -"^It^ 



YAN'S 




. 



Chinese Restaurant & Lounge 




SERVING LUNCH C* DINNER 



LUNCH BUFFET 

Monday thru Friday - Lakehurst 
7 Days a Week ■ Libertyville 



- #1 . - £0 

100 N. Milwaukee Ave* 



: Libertyville, IL 
847/816-6988 



OPEN 7 

DAYS A 

WEEK 



Carry Out Specialists 



911 Lakehurst Road, 

, OutaldeUkchunilMall 

Waukegan,IL 
847/473-1660 ■ 




Jenny's Restaurant 

Chape! Hill Countrq Club 

Murder Mystery Dinner 

Saturday, November 23, 1996 

Ali/rcfer, Mystery, Mayhem, & Funt 

$55.00 Couple - SSO.OO Single 

Seating Is limited! Make your reservation today! 

j I Thanksgiving 
^Family Style Teast 

$9.95 Adults • $5.95 Children (3-10) 

Thursday, November 28th 

12:00 Noon -6:00 p.m. 

Don't Hunt Down Your Turkey Dinner - Come to Jenny's Restaurant/ 

2500 N. Chapel Hill Road 

McHcnry (815)385-0333 




■ 



: 




884-3900 

1149 Coif Rd, West, Hoffman Estates 




949-1550 

890 East Route 45 
Mundelein, IL 60060 

WHERE FRESHNESS ISA SPECIALTY 

SZ tlnique 

^Experience in 

Seafood ^Dining 

i^lso an excellent selection 

of fine meat entrees 

Featuring: 

Live Entertainment - Tues. thru Sat. 
Through November. Music by Dave Major 

Dally Specials 

Private Party Facilities 

Ample Parking 

Early Bird Menu 
Sunday thru Friday 

Gift Certificates Available 

Open Dally: 

Monday thru Friday, 11 am 

Saturday, 4 pm 

Sunday, 2 pm 

All major credit cards accepted 




And Frigate Lounge 

Overlooking Beautiful Long Lake 

SINCE 1947 



This Saturday, Nov. 16th: 

"An Affordable, Fun Night" 
Enjoy Our Dinner - Open Bar - Entertainment Package 
The Package Includes Your Choice Of: 

• New York Strip Steak <fc m so r\/\ 

• Filet & Shrimp 

• (7) Jumbo Fantail Shrimp 
Soup - Salad Bar - Potato Included. 

• Your Open Bar From 7 - 11:00 pm 

(All Premium Brands Included) 

• Live Entertainment: Emle Gamer 

on the Keyboards 

Popular Country, Rock N Roll, 

Top 40 Music 

from the 60's-70's-80's 

• DJ & Dancing After Ernie 

Open Until 3:00 am 

•Regular Menu Available 



$45< 

per couple 




Lake County's Favorite! 



Our Regular Senior Menu Available - Your 
Cocktail Included in Price. 



(847) 587-3211 

LOCATED ON ROLLINS RD. • INGLESIDE 

8 Miles West of Gurnee Mills on Rollins Rood 

Between Wilson and Fairfield 



TERRY'Q 

i MEXICAN W 
RESTAURANT & BAR 

Voted # i 
3rd Year in a Row! 

DAILY LUNCH 
& DINNER SPECIALS 



!">t 

m 



*a 



5£v 



m:*; 



Rocontly, Sherman Kaplan 
ol WBBM Newsrodio 78 
reviewed Tonyls giving 
Ihom on oxcollont *K" 
rating, 16 out ol 20, which 
was announced on tho 
radio, Seplombor 9lh, 



TRy our new AddmuN: 

OSTRICH FAJITAS 

(The all new rage in healthy meat.) 

FRIDAY & SATURDAY! 

TttESE Entrees Are Redly Ddkiovsl 

• ChipoTiE Roast Ed Duck 

• RoASTtd Ponk 

• RoASTEd Bee? TENdERloiN 

• CliipoTU New YoRk Strip Roast 

PRIVATE ROOM AVAILABLE! 

■ No SHokiNq Area • HANdicAppid Accessible 

/Innovative 
I Gourmet i 
% Tex : M ex I 
\Cuisine / 

525 N. SEYMOUR • MUNDELEIN, IL 

(IN THE HAWLEV COMMONS) carrv-out 

566-9530 

FAX 566-9590 



TERRY'C 

I MEXICAN W 
RESTAURANT & BAR 



/« 



:£=__' ^j 



HOURS: 

MOMFRI11 AM-10PM 

SATURDAY 4 PM - 10 PM • CLOSED SUNDAY 




NovEMben 15, 1996 UkElANtj NewspApERS LAKEUFE 





El 



CrossworcI 



ACROSS 

1 Daring 
5 Barracks 
^ntem 
8 Strikebreaker 
12' Sheriff Andy's 
boy 

13 Acapulco gold 

14 Tommy of 
Broadway 

15 Eggy desserts 

17 Church area 

18 Rearward 

19 Folies- 
Bergere 
dance 

21 Caviar 

22 Verdi work 

23 Make louder, 
for short 

26 Twisted 
28 Basketball 

legend 

George 
31 Fingcrpaint 
33 Female sib 

35 "Quo Vadis?" 
role 

36 Inch along 
laterally 

38 Sch. org. 

40 Fix a seam 

41 Swarthy 
43 Idolater's 

emotion 



.45 Surrey 

decoration 
47 Swamp 

51 Nexus 

52 American 
dessert 

54 Lip 

55 Article in 
"Time"? 

56 Theater, in 
Madrid 

57 Novelist 
Nathanael 

58 Funnyman 
Caesar 

59 Labels 
DOWN 

1 Florida resort 

town, briefly 

2 "Bloom County* 

penguin 

3 Roster 

4 Dissuade 

5 Trees 

6 California 

fort . 

7 Puccini work 

8 Sub of a 
sort 

9 Lunch-box 

desserts 

10 Handle 

1 1 Existed 

16 Queued up 
20 Intention 



23 Newspaper 
revenue 
sources 

24 — tai 

. (cocktail) 

25 Creamy 
desserts 

27 Squeal 

29 "Stay as 
Sweet as 
You^- 

30 Without 
further ado 

32 It may 

provide 

security 
34 Bearing 

postage 
37 Work unit 
39 MP's quarry 
42 "O Solitude" 

writer 

44 Not sagging 

45 Took wing 

46 Carousel, 
for one 

48 Samoan 
seaport 

49 Spill the 
beans 

50 Bishoprics 

53 — Beta Kappa 



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ARIES (March 21 to 
April 19) All calms down 
this week on the domestic 
front and you are able to 
concentrate on important 
career developments. A 
link to the past comes up at 
an unexpected time. How- 
ever, this is a pleasant 
surprise, The weekend is 
good for shopping and gad- 
ding about. 

TAURUS (April 20 to 
May 20) You are able to 
read between the lines at 
what a friend is saying this 
week. This person needs 
your help, but doesn't quite 
know how to ask for it. 
Your instinct will tell you 
what to do. Over the , 
weekend, a surprise phone 
call brings good news. 

GEMINI (May 21 to 
June 20) You have, a ten- 
dency this week to be slop- 
py and careless, 
particularly on the job. Use 
caution if operating 
machinery or out driving. 
As the week comes to a 
close, you are able to recap- 
lure your powers of con- 
centration. 

CANCER (June 21 to 
' July 22) As the week 
begins, you're a bit dis- 
oriented and experiencing 
some deja vu at the most 
inconvenient times. How- 
ever, you conquer this and 
.are able to effectively ac- 
complish what you set out 
to do by week's end. A 
quick weekend getaway is 
in the stars for some. 

LEO (July 23 to August 
22) You're positively 
"roarin* " to go in typical 



Leo fashion this week. 
You're a bundle of energy 
and an inspiration to those 
around you. It seems no one 
can resist your enthusiasm! 
Take advantage of this 
spirit of cooperation; 

VIRGO (August 23 to 
September 22) Nitpicking 
and harping over insig- 
nificant details won't en- 
dear you to those around 
, you as the week begins. 
Your quest for perfec- 
tionism can sometimes lead 
to trouble for you. Later in 
the week, your mate con- 
fides a secret to you. 

LIBRA (September 23 to 
October 22) You're in one 
of your forlorn phases and 
feel as though everything's 
going badly. Instead of 
being such a fatalist, take 
steps to change what's 
bothering you. By week's 
end, you are once again 
your charming, sunny self. 
The weekend looks great 
for some happy social out- 
ings. 

SCORPIO (October 23 
to November 21) Jealousy 
doesn't become you and if 
you insist on giving into it, 
you could lose someone 
very special in your life. A 
• midweek career oppor- 
tunity catches* you" by 
surprise, but once you 

recover,you are able to take 
advantage of this boon. . 

SAGITTARIUS 
(November 22 to Decem- 
ber 21) This is a great week 
for catching up on those lit- 
tle work projects you've let 
fall by the wayside, 
whether at home or actually 



on the job. Bigwigs are 
looking favorably at your 
performance now and a 
rai se or promotion could be 
in the works. 

CAPRICORN (Decem- 
ber to January Impos- 
sible, take some time this 
week to get off by yourself 
and sort things out. The 
answer to what's bothering 
you can only be attained if 
you can reflect quietly 
without any interference. 

AQUARIUS(January20 
to February 18) Your 
honesty pays off and your 
relationship takes a 
wonderfully, dizzying new 
romantic turn. However, 
the singles among you still 
aren't quite ready to make a 
commitment. Those who 
are married renew ties. 

PISCES (February 19 to 
March 20) You have a ten- 
dency this week to take 
your troubles out on the 
person closest to you. As 
you know from past ex- 
perience, this bodes ill for 
that relationship. 




Su 



&J 






Be a part of 
Lakeland 



Lakeland's Newspapers' annual Holidays and 
Traditions booklets are going to press soon! 

Share your Holiday Spirit with Lake County and 
keep the excitement going all year long! 

Send us your favorite holiday recipes, crafts, fam- 
ily tradition stories, or your most special holiday 
photographs and become a part of these exciting 
booklets! 

Deadline for all entries is November 15! 
Send items to Roselle Love, 
c/o Lakeland Newspapers, 
30 S. Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 



Marshall Field's Holidazzle 
parade lights up Chicago Nov. 1 5 



Willi' 



To officially reopen State 
Street, downtown Chicago will 
be transformed into a dazzling 
display of lights and music Nov. 
15 through 17 during the 
Marshall Field's Holidazzle 
Parade, sponsored by Dain 
Bosworth Investment Services. 

The parade — the first of its 
kind in Chicago, and one of only 
two in the country— will begin at 
Randolph Street and weave its 
way down State Street to 
Jackson Boulevard. Each night, 
the Marshall Field's Holidazzle 
Parade will start at 6:30 p.m. and 
last approximately 35 minutes. 

Consisting of 35 floats with 
more than 200,000 lights, musi- 
cal groups, celebrity grand mar- 
shals and more than 175 cos- 
tumed characters from popular 
nursery rhymes and storybooks, 



the Marshall Field's Holidazzle 
Parade's distinguishing feature 
is the fact that every float and 
character is lighted. 

Parade-goers will witness 
their favorite children's stories 
coming to life like never before. 
Floats, such as the Princess and 
the Pea; Pied Piper; Mother 
Goose; Captain Hook with Peter 
Pan and Tinker Bell; Cinderalla; 
the Old Woman Who Lives in a 
Shoe; and many more, will be 
decked out with bright lights. 

In addition to the famous 
story and nursery rhyme 
favorites, the Marshall Field's 
Holidazzle Parade features char- 
acters who have become famous 
right here in Chicago: the 
Marshall Field's Jingle Elves are 
back and will make their 1996 
debut during the parade. 



The Elves — who spend the 
month of December practicing 
random acts of kindness 
throughout Chicagoland — will 
appear on, in and around their 
very own lighted float, which 
resembles a giant gift box, pass- 
ing out goodies to parade 
watchers. 

Prior to the parade on Nov. 
15, the official reopening of 
State Street will begin at 5 p.m. A 
ribbon-cutting ceremony will 
take place at 6 p.m. and include 
Mayor Daley and Marshall 
Field's executives. 

The Marshall Field's 
Holidazzle Parade will be broad- 
cast live that night on ABC7 
Chicago at 6:30 p.m. 

For questions on the 
Holidazzle Parade, call (312)781- 
5454. 



".."j i 



.YS&J' 



SUBSCRIBE TODAY! Lake land 

223"Sl ^51 Newspaper's 



iibwhi ii ■■!>» iw 




LAKELIFE UkElANd Newspapers Novemder 1 5, 1 996 



New beauty pageant seeks contestants 




IS??-" • 



Desiree Russell as a child 

"America's Beautiful Babies 
and America's Beautiful Kids" is 
the name of the upcoming beau- 
ty pageant in the Lake County , 
area. Gurnee resident, Desiree 
Russell has taken her own per- 
sonal experience and love for 
pageantry to the next level by 
creating a new pageant. 

"J'm doing it (the pageant) 
for fun and because I love work- 
ing with kids... I think pageants 
are good for them," said Russell. 
Russell has been involved in 
pageantry since the age of five. 
Her titles include Baby Miss 
Illinois, Little Miss America, 
Junior Miss Illinois, Miss Illinois 
Star and Young America Miss 
National. 



"I've been involved in it 
(pageants) for a long time and 
many people told me that I 
should start my own," explained 
Russell. 

The "America's Beautiful 
Babies and America's Beautiful 
Kids" pageant is open to new- 
comers of the beauty contest tra- 
dition. The girls can compete 
from ages 0-13 and boys from 
ages 0-7. Russell's pageant dif- 
fers from other area and national 
pageants in the scoring aspect. 
For the beauty portion, children 
will be scored 50% on their for 1 . 
mal wear and 50% on their 
sports wear. 

The children will also scored 
on their photogenic qualities. 
Caption awards will be given in 
such categories as "prettiest 
hair" and "prettiest eyes." There 
will be two winners in this 
pageant. One boy or girl In the 
age range of 0-4 years old and 5- 
13 years old. 

Currently, Russell trains girls 
ages 3-10 in "pageant imaging." 
She teaches the girls how to 
compete well in various 
pageants that they are involved 
in. The students book one on 
one sessions with Russell in 
which she helps them with inter- 
view techniques, modeling 
styles, and also hair and make- 
up help. Through her pageant 
imaging program, Russell has 



seen one student win Young 
American Junior Miss Illinois 
and others capture the title of 
first runner-up in the towns of 
Libertyville and Mudelein. 

"Pageants are good for kids 

mm 




Desiree Russell 

because they keep them involved 
and my own pageant will keep 
me involved with pageantry loo," 
stated Russell. 

The "America's Beautiful 
Rabies and America's Beautiful 
Kids" Pageant will take place on 
April (i, 1997 at the Mundelein 
I loliday Inn. The total cost for 
entering the pageant is $100. 
Contact Desiree Russell at 223- 
WS9 iw '.v.ovo details.— by 



SUBSCRIBE TODAY! La k e land 

H ^5 B Newspapers 




1S& m part of 
Lakeland/ TVeampapert 
€fufistma& ^alida^! 

Lakeland's Newspapers' annual Holidays and Traditions booklets 
are going to press soon! 

Share your Holiday Spirit with Lake County and keep the excite- 
ment going all year long! 

Send us your favorite holiday recipes, crafts, family tradition sto- 
ries, or your most special holiday photographs and become a part of 
these exciting booklets! 

Deadline for all entries is November 15! 

Send items to Roselle Love, 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers, 

30 S. Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 




57=3?* 



* • * 



s* 



ana 



m 







Apple Crisp 



NANCY KELLEY- 
WAUCONDA 
i 6 cups (4 large) peeled, 
J cored and sliced apples 

1/2 cup wafpKriic-i oAl 
2 tsps. lemon juice 
3/4 cup flour 
1/2 cup firmly packed 
brown sugar 
1/2 cup sugar 
1 tsp. cinnamon 
1/2 cup butter 
Arrange prepared apples in a well greased 9-inch square pan or 
well greased 2 quart casserole. Sprinkle with water and lemon juice, 
combine flour, sugars and cinnamon in a mixing bowl. Blend well. 
Cut in butter with pastry blender until mixture resembles coarse 
meal. Spoon crumb mixture evenly over apples. 

Bake at 375 for 40 to 50 minutes. Serve with vanilla ice cream if 
desired. 

Makes 6 to 8 servings. 

Brandied Sweet Potatoes 

LOUISE jANKOWIAK-LAKE VILLA 

G cooked sweet potatoes (cut In halves) - ' 

1/2 cup orange juice 

1/2 cup brandy (or a little less) 

2 Tbls. grated orange rind 

1 TbI. corn starch mixed with 

added to orange juice-add brandy after thickened: 
1/3 cup sugar 
1/2 tsp. salt 
1 /3 cup brown sugar 
3 Tbls. butter or margarine 
Place sweet potatoes in baking dish. Combine other ingredients, 
cook and stir until thickened. Pour over sweet potatoes. Bake at 350 
for 30 minutes. 

Blueberry Gelatin Salad 

MARILYN HEARD-INGLESIDE 

1 large pkg. (6 oz.) cherry jello 

2 cups boiling water 

1 can (15 oz.) blueberries in heavy syrup (not pie filling), 

undralned 

1 pkg. (8 oz.) softened cream cheese 

1/2 cup sugar 

1 tsp. vanilla extract 

1 cup (8 oz.) Sour cream 

1/4 cup chopped pecans 

In a bowl, dissolve jello in boiling water; stir in blueberries. Pour 
into a 12x8x12 dish; chill until set. In a mixing bowl beat cream 
cheese and sugar until smooth. Add vanilla and sour cream; mix well. 
Spread over the jello layer and sprinkle with pecans. Chill several 
hours or overnite. 

Makes 10 to 12 servings. Can use cherries instead of blueberries 
for Christmas! 

Mexican Lasagna 

ROXANE KISLIA-KENOSHA 
1 lb. learn ground beef 

1 can retried beans 

2 tsp. oregano 

1 tsp. cumin (cumlno) 
3/4 tsp. garlic 

12 uncooked Lasagna noodles 

2 1/2 cups water 

2 1/2 cups Plcante sauce 

2 cups sour cream 

3/4 cup finely sliced green onions 

1 can black olives 

1 cup shredded cheese any kind 

Combine beef (uncooked), beans and spices. Place four uncooked 
noodles in bottom of 13x9x2 pan. Spread 1/2 of mixture over noodles, 
top with four more noodles, spread remaining meat mixture over 
noodles, top with four more. 

Combine in bowl, water and Picante sauce, stir, pour over and 
lightly cover with foil. Bake at 350 degrees for 11/2 hours. 

Combine sour cream, onions and olives, spoon over casserole top 
with cheese and bake uncovered until cheese is melted (about 5 min- 
utes). 

Hope's Bacon Spaghetti 

HOPE STODDARD-ANTIOCH 

The best spaghetti you'll ever taste! 

3/4 to 1 lb. of bacon (partially frozen) 

1 can Contadlna tomato sauce 

1 can Contadlna Pasta Ready dice tomatoes (onions and 

garlic Is best) 

1 medium onion 

1 tsp. pepper 

1 tsp. sugar 

spaghetti 

Cut partially frozen bacon width-wise into 1-inch strips. Fry in 
medium to large pot (do not drain bacon drippings!). Dice onion and 
add to bacon when bacon starts to crisp. Once onions start becoming 
clear, add sauce and diced tomatoes and stir to mix. Add pepper and 
sugar, mix. Simmer for approximately 15 to 20 minutes. Cook 
spaghetti noodles. When done, drain and add to sauce mixture. Mix 



well. 



Serves 3 to 4. 



NovcMbER IS, 1996 UltElANd Newspapers AT HOME 




Painted Lakes offers exceptional value 



u 



-mm 



Nestled in the heart of Lake County's fastest growing 
housing area, the Lake Villa Painted Lakes development 
features 14 home models, all of which are designed to 
; make raising a family easier. 

Perhaps the most intriguing aspect of the Painted 
Lakes development is that the 218 single-family homes 
will all feature rear home placements that don't backup 
to another home. 

"People want privacy in their lives," said Jeanne 
Martini, sales representative. The homes are laid out in 
cul-de-sacs which feature a smaller cluster of homes with 
large areas of greenway* between cul de sacs. Lot sizes 
range from nearly one-quarter to one-third acre or more. 

Several of the homes will backup to the Sun Lake 
Forest Preserve, offering residents a unique view of 
nature and bonus open 
space. 

Home prices start at 
the mid-$150,000s 
through the $225,000 
range, but even the 
least inexpensive home 
has some very impres- 
sive features. 

"I really believe 
there is a tremendous 
amount of value in our 
home plans for the 
price," said Martini. 
Several Centex Homes 
standard items are 
optional from other 
builders. 

One such exception- 
al value is the landscap- 
ing package. "Each 
home receives five trees 
for the rear yard in addi- 
tion to the trees which 
are to be planted in the 

public greenways," said Martini. Other standards include: 
an asphalt driveway, vinyl windows, maintenance-free 
exteriors and an insulated front entry door with coach 
light. Public sidewalks are also included. 

"We believe this is a great location at which to live 
whether you're moving up to a larger house in Lake 
County or moving into the county," said Martini. "We 
are close to Gurnee Mills, the new train station and other 
amenities." 

The homes are in the Antioch high school district and 
Antioch Dist. 34 for elementary school. 

"I think this is the next boom area of Lake County for 
businesses and homes," said Martini. 

There are four fully-furnished models available for view- 
ing. Well-positioned signs designate options so prospective 
buyers have the opportunity to make judgments on the 
options. The diversity of the decorated models allows buyers 
to see the homes with a personal touch. 

The community opened for sale May 31 and phase 
one is currently under construction. The community has 
had 13 closings so far and is expected to be complete 
within two years. 

The models in the Genesis Class Homes including 
Alexandra, Augusta, Bristol, Camden and Dalton feature 
partial basements with the basic price. The models in the 
Genesis Heritage Homes include Franklin, Fitzgerald, 
Dalton II, Groveton, Harrison, Essex II, Inverness and 



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One of the many options available in the Centex Homes 
Painted Lakes development is large porches. 



Jefferson feature full basements as part of the basic price. 
The Alexandra has three bedrooms, 21/2 baths, fami- 
ly room, flex room and eat-in kitchen an a roomy 1,555 
square feet of living space. There is an optional three-car 
garage. Optional upgrades can add up to 2,000 square 
feet to each of the Painted Lakes models. 

The Augusta has three bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, family 
room, eat-in-kitchen, living/dining room with 1,656 
square feet. There is an optional three-car garage and 
optional master bedroom extension. 

The Bristol features three bedrooms, 21/2 baths, fam- 
ily room, eat-in kitchen, formal living and dining room 
with 1,804 square feet. Options include a three-car 
garage, bonus room, and extensions of the master bed- 
room and family room. 

The Camden at 1,930 
square feet features four 
bedrooms, 21/2 baths, 
family room, eat-in 
kitchen, formal living and 
dining rooms with 
options of a three-car 
garage, bonus room, 
extensions of the family 
room and master bed- 
room. 

The Dalton features 
four bedrooms with a loft 
or five bedrooms, family 
room, eat-in kitchen, for- 
mal living and dining 
room with 2,150 square 
feet of living space. 
Options include: master 
bedroom and family room 
extensions, three -car 
garage, optional bonus 
room. ■ 

The Franklin features 
four bedrooms, 2 1/2 
baths, family room, living room, living or dining room 
with 2,203 square feet of living space. Options include: 
extended family room, bonus room and optional extend- 
ed master bedroom. 

The Fitzgerald features 2,327 square feet of living 
space with four bedrooms, 21/2 baths, family room, liv- 
ing room, dining room and optional extended family 
room, bonus room and extended living room. 

The Dalton II features four bedrooms with a loft of 
five bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, eat-in kitchen, extended fam- 
ily room, formal living room and dining room, extended 
master bedroom, eat-in optional bonus room. 

The Groveton is 2,391 square feet of living space with 
four bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, family room, living room, 
dining room, optional extended family room, bonus 
room and optional extended master bedroom. 

The Harrison features four bed- 
rooms, 2 1/2 baths, family room, den, p- 
living room, dining room, optional 
extended family room, bonus room, 
optional extended master room. There 
is 2,466 square feet of living space. 

The Essex II is 2,537 square feet of liv- 
ing space featuring four bedrooms, first 
floor den, 2 1/2 baths, extended family 
roam, eat-in kitchen, extended master 
See PAINTED LAKES page B18 




Creating festive 
homes for the 




Don't let 
stress spoil 
holidays 








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Each of the model homes offers three exte- 
rior plans each combining brick and low- 
maintenance siding. 



Story by 

Rhonda. He trick 
Burke 

Photos by 

Linda Chapman 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 




• LiE AT HOME UvkElAwd Newspapers NovemBer 1 5, 1 996 



From page B17 

bedroom, formal living and dining room, optional bonus 

room. 

The Inverness features 2,599 square feet of living space 
with four bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, family room, den, living 
room, dining room, loft or fifth bedroom, optional sun room, 
optional extended bedroom 2 and bonus room. 

The Jefferson features 2,740 square feet of living space 
with four bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, family room, den, living 
room, dining room, optional extended family room, bonus 
room, optional extended master bedroom. 

Walk-out and garden basements are available on selected homesites. 




Each of the Painted Lakes model homes is uniquely decorated offering perspective buyers an 
opportunity to see the homes with personal touches. Gas burning fireplaces are available in each 
of the models. 



TlV-i^&n ;..\ 

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Hi ■ ':[{■-■ ----: 4-'fe 



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Let Us Help You Light Tour Home This Holiday. 

Warren Electric 

Fixture Showroom & Electrical Supplies 






Home 



for the holidays 



SAVE 50 % OFF 

Manufactured List 

All Paddle Fans & Chandeliers 

(Installation Available) 



at the Leider's Garden Greenery 
Annual Christmas Open House. 

Sunday November 1 7 
10:00 am to 2:00 pm 



m 



W^/im W%?Z.. 



/ 



^/ 



Refreshments & Door Prizes ■ Poinsettias& Poinseuia Trees 

Christmas Arrangements & Centerpieces 

Handmade Gifts & Holiday Decorations • Fresh & Artificial Wreaths 

...And Lots Of Good Cheer! 



InGrayslake 

Onthecomerof 

Rte. 83 and Lake Street' 

(847)223-2422 




lEIDERS 

GARDEN GREENERY INC. 



HOURS 
Mon-'FrL 

D a m. to 6 pim 

Sat&Sun. 
9 am. to 5 p.m. 



Gift Certificates Available 

Decorative Lamps & Chandeliers 

Crystal Pieces 

Piano Lamps 

Many Lamps 

2-Story Foyer Pieces 

Paddle Fans 

Indoor & Outdoor Lighting 

223-8691 

33261 N. Hwy. 45 
Grayslake, IL 

Installation Available 
Lamp Repairs 



Presidential I 



W 



LISTEN TO THE SILENCE 




Can't Find A Gourmet Kitchen to 
Cook Your Holiday Bird? 





2nd Floor Screened Porch 

with Spectacular Views. One 

Acre Lots. Visit Us & 

Appreciate New 

Construction A t Its Finest! 

Models Now Open! 

Monday - Friday 9-5:00 pm; 

satur ^BvXZ 1 tm!nt° m - ^ ft At Men Creek! 

When You've Arrived... 




Antioch's Premier 
Custom Community 

Directions: Rt 173 West 
of fit 45 to Deep Lake Road, North 1/2 Mile 



Offered Exclusively Byt 

NATIONAL LANDMARK CROUP • (847) 838-0130 

S9S Hidden Creek Drive Antioch, it 60002 



mmm 



LENNOX FURNACES HELP PAY FOR THEMSELVES. AND 
RIGHT NOW THEY'LL EVEN HELP PAY FOR OTHER THINGS 



t m8 ty m% &m?m ^™v "xm&msm, 



Up to $100' Satiate ' " 1 

' * I 

on sefect fteiuinsj atufcoofinj products 1 



- ""*"*??m 



High efficiency 
Lennox equipment can save 
you money over time. But 
hurry in and right now you 




can also get a 
\ rebate on select products. 
The catch? You have to 
decide how to spend it. 



LENNOX 

ONE LESS THING TO WORRY ABOUT." 



HURTHERH 683 E. Center St. fi/jiiwil GLSEH 

AIR SYSTEMS, INC. S3&S Pr/ii ir»Myv* HtMTIHG t AIH COHWIOHING = 

223-8877 uraysiaKe 949-5111 

Rebate Offer Expires 12-31-96. Limit one rebate check per furnace. 
Financing Available on Lennox equipment 

FOR FULL DETAILS ON THIS LIMITED TIME OFFER. SEE YOUR PARTICIPATING LENNOX DEALER. 
CLENNOX INDUSTRIES INC., 1995. LENNOX DEALERS ARE INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED BUSINESSES 



mre? 



. 1997 

NOTHING THROWS SNOW LIKE THIS! 



TORO. 





INTRODUCING THE \, x 

TORO®CCR 

POWERLITE.™ 

■ Throws snow 25 (cot 

• Weights only 36 lbs. 

• Powerful 3.0 hp engine 

• Electric start model available 



TORO® CCR 2400 
QStf SNOWTHROWER 

• Exclusive Power Curve® rotor system 
cleans down to the pavement 

• 4 hp engine 

• 20* clearing width 
CCR240O* T ^ rows snow U P t0 25 feet 

'For qualified buyers on Toro's Revolving Charge Plan, Price subject to local dealer option. t See dealer lor details on this limited warranty. 



Master Service __ __ 
Dealer Offers: 

-* Professional Assembly Which Includes 

Set-Up, Service and All Adjustments 
; • Factory Trained Mechanics . . ■ 

• Authorized Warranty Service 

• Genuine Toro Paris 



GRAYSLAP FEED SALES 

Outdoor Power Equipment 

Rt. 120 & Slusser St. 223-6333 



*f*JJ^V i- 



TEfil AT HOME UkelANcJ Newspapers NovemIjsii 1 5, 1 996 





K/GIV8NG 




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W>^V Save on Carpet from $6" per yard 
• Stainmaster Plus tt* -* -m new 

carpet reg. i9» yd. $ | 9 9 1|> Ceramic Tile 

Free pad installation ! ! (per yard ^ . Q . . 

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SSUXL 



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Above, the Jefferson model features the. extended family room to give 
buyers a realistic perspective of the available options. 



LOW OVERHEAD GARAGE DOORS of ANTIOCH 

estL tes (847) 595 9581 

Expert InstaLLation • Fully Insurecj 

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Its not too early to think Lay-Away for the Holidays! 



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Sofa 

• Love Scat 

• Chair 

• 2 End Tables 

• 1 Cocktail Table 

• 2 Lamps 




C *°ose ife3 

Will You be Entertaining guests with the same old furniture or a NEW Livingroom set from NIX'S 



3Pc. 





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Stcirtiitg at 

$ 199 

Metal Futon 






Financing 

Available 

90 Days 

Same as Cash 

(to qualified 

Buyers) 

Curio Cabinets 
20 styles to 
choose from 



Starling at $189 



OUTLET 



C0 'SLT ith, !I^^AllABLE 
1020 Rollins Rd., Round Lake Heights 

(847) 546-7787 



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NovEMbER 1 3, 1 996 UkeUiNd Newspapers AT HOME 



r.^- 



DECORATilNq DEIVlilNSJONS^ 

Creating festive home for the holidays 



It's that time of year when families 
come together to share the holidays. What 
better time to get the house looking and 
feeling warm and festive? Here are just a 
few suggestions to give your home a cozy, 
romantic glow. 

The entrance is a good place to start 
since it is here that first impressions are 
made. Dress up the front 
door with a dried floral 
wreath or colorful Indian 
corn. Is your front hall 
welcoming with good 
lighting and a convenient 
place to hang coats? 
Mirrors and candlelight 
brighten a foyer, and a 
rich oriental or braided , 
rug adds a warm touch. 
Perhaps this is the year to 
consider new wallcover- 
ing for the front hall. 

Moving on from the foyer, family and 
friends usually settle into the living or 
family room, where warmth and comfort 
are crucial. If you have a fireplace, consid- 
er a damask mantle scarf to add rich tex- 
ture, accessorized with lighted candles and 
family photos. A big, brass container is 
wonderful for holding extra firewood. 
Look at the furniture arrangement. Are 
pieces arranged in comfortable conversa- 
tional groupings? 

In the dining room, your goal should 
be a delicious atmosphere for home- 
cooked meals. Drape the table with a holi- 
day linen. You can easily create a table 




cloth out of any fabric that suits your 
fancy. For an enchanting combination, 
drape the table with two coordinating 
table cloths— a rich solid as a base topped 
with a shorter coordinating pattern. The 
centerpiece should be lively but not over- 
bearing, as you don't want it to act as a 
barrier between guests. Besides, you want 
to save room for the mouth- 
watering delicacies you have pre- 
pared. 

If you have guests staying the 
night, think of ways you can make 
them feel at home. Inspire the 
guest room with fresh flowers or 
potpourri. Holiday inspired throw 
pillows on the bed add a cozy 
dimension. Are the window treat- 
ments designed for privacy should 
they want it? Consider some deco- 
rative shade options, such as bal- 
loon or roman shades. These can 
be custom made in coordinating pattern 
to give your room that finishing touch. 
And don't forge to lay out plush towels and 
extra blankets. 

Along with these, there are a dozen 
more ways to make your guests and family 
feel at home for the holidays. Put your 
family's personality into everything you 
do. Preparing to welcome family and 
guests to your house is a lot of fun, if not a 
great excuse to complete that long overdue 
decorating project!— by MARY LEBEN, . 
Decorating Den, Grayslake and 
Gurnee. For decorating questions, 
call Leben at 662-6612. 



Don't let stress of holiday 
season get to you thi 




Remember how fun the holidays were when you were a child?You got to stay up 
. late to celebrate with your family, eating all kinds of cookies and candy and squirming 
in anticipations of the gifts you might get Oh, how things have changed. Now, as an 
adult, you spend most of your time in crowded stores buying gifts for other people— 
and going over your budget Why it the holiday season so hectic? 

It doesn't have to be. With some advance planning, this time of year can be just as 
exciting for you as it is for young children. 

GifKgiving is an integral part of the holiday season, and shopping probably takes 
up most of your pre-holiday time±and causes you the most aggravation: 

One way to ease this stress is to start shopping early. Keep your eyes peeled for the 
"perfect" gifts for the people in your life; you may find them when you least expect 

Another way to beat the stress is to be creative and make your own' gifts. Whether 
you create a card with a personal poem written especially for the recipient or you draw 
a poster for a favorite little one, gift possibilities are endless. The only requirements are 
your imagination and effort 

To make planning the family party easier, give everyone his or or her own job to do. 
Have your children help you clean the house or decorate the cookies. As for your 
guests, ask everyone to bring a dish, whether it be ah appetizer, side dish or dessert 
They usually are glad to help. 

Travel arrangements can be very frustrating. To make it easier, plan your itinerary 
as far in advance as you can. You may be able to get cheaper rates if you make reserva- 
tions early. 

Take a new approach to the holiday season this year— enjoy it! If you do, the noli- ' 
days may take on a whole new meaning for you. 



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AT HOME UkElAid Newspapers November 15, 1996 



New home walk-throughs pays off for buyers 



The Home Owners Association of Greater 
Chicago recommends mat you and your 
buUder "walk-through" the house to conduct 
a final inspection. The walk-through provides 
an opportunity for you to spot items which 
may need to be corrected or adjusted. It also 
allows you to learn about the 
way your new home works. 

Often, a builder will use the 
walk-through to educate buyers 
about: 

• The operation of the 
house's components. 

• The buyer's responsibilities 
for maintenance and upkeep. 

• Warranty coverage and 
procedures. 

• The larger community in 
which the home is located. 

With a new house, you will be receiving a 
stack of instruction booklets all at once. It 
helps if someone takes the time to show you 



home 

'96 



how to operate all of the kitchen appliances, 
the heating and cooking systems, the water 
heater and other features in the home. 

It is important that you be thorough and 
observant during the walk-through. Examine 
all surfaces of counters, fixtures, floors and 

walls for possible damage careful- 
ly. Sometimes disputes arise 
because a buyer may discover a 
gouge in a counter top after 
move-in, and there is no way to 
prove whether it was caused by 
the builder's workers or the 
buyer's movers. 

Ask a lot of questions dur- 
ing the walk-through and take 
notes on the answers. Never be 
afraid to appear stupid by asking 
too many questions. That is how you leam. It 
is important to view the walk-through as a 
positive learning experience which will 
enhance your enjoyment of your home. 



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ffl".] LIPSERVICE UkElANd Newspapers NovEMbER 1 5, 1996 



LIPSERVICE 

It's t^e taLI< of tI-ie town 

Get |t off you R c^est (847) 225-8075 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Lipservice is a phone-in column presented as a feature of 
Lakeland Newspapers. Lakeland Newspapers makes no claim to 
the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland Newspapers does not 
claim the content or the subject matter as fact, but as the personal 
opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to 
edit copy or to refrain from printing a message. Call in at 223-8073 
and leave your message 24-hours a day. Although the call is 
anonymous, please leave your village name. 



Got your message 

To the woman who called me 
regarding the Jaycees, I did get 
your message. Unfortunately, 
my machine erased it before I 
could copy your name and 
number down! Please call 
again and I will be glad to tell 
you all about Jaycees. By the 
way, the Antioch Jaycees have 
changed their meeting to the 
last Monday of the month, 7:30 
p.m., at Ramada Inn on Route 
173. Hope to see you there! 

What happened? 

I wonder what happened to 
Anna Marie's Pizzeria in Island 
Lake. All the chairs are up and 
it looks like they're out of busi- 
ness. It was the best pizza 
around and I'm really upset. 
Someone tell us what hap- 
pened. 

Logic questioned 

I question the logic of the Army 
Corps of Engineers in permit- 
ting Antioch Golf Course to fill 
* in many acres of woodlands, 
.^ -digging a private channel off 
Spring Lake, and now burning 
the few remaining wetlands 
that are there. Wild animals 
will be burned alive, as they 
have no place to run with 
water on one side and fire on 
the other. Why are they going 
to burn in the fall when no veg- 
etation will grow until spring? 
This will create a major erosion 
during the winter. 

Eyesores 

My husband and I were walk- 
ing through our neighborhood 
the other night and couldn't 
believe our eyes. There was a 
house painted dark green and 
another one painted dark green 
with red trim. Why did these 
people move here if they didn't 
like the color of the neighbor- 
hood? It's like putting an art 
deco house in a Victorian 
neighborhood. How could they 
do that to their neighbors' 
property values? 

Violating the law 

There's an apartment building in 
Crayslake where a tenant is using 
a handicapped spot and she is 
not handicapped. It belonged to 
her mother and her mother died. 
Furthermore, she has a 
Wisconsin license plate. How 
come some people can operate 
on an out-of-state license plate? It 
really ticks me off. 

Don't worry 

A sports bar in Round Lake 
Heights? What will we do? 
Could it be that right next to 
the police station that people 
can get so tanked up that 
they're going to get irresponsi- 



ble? I would worry more about 
the people in bars farther away 
from a police station than I 
would one right under their 
nose. The people calling to 
complain about this is a waste 
of time. 



Send postcard 

For all the readers 



of 



Lipservice, I 
Mobile Eye, 
locate them, 
moved their 
Round Lake 



tried to join 
but I couldn't 
They recently 
office to the 
Beach Police 
Department. If you're interest- 
ed in joining, send a postcard 
to 916 W. Rollins Rd., Round 
Lake Beach, Attn: Mobile Eye. 
I'm sure they'd be happy to 
send information on them and 
their next meeting date. 

Are you seen? 

People should bear in mind 
that while driving in the 
evening or early in the morn- 
ing, they may be able to see. 
However, can they be seen? 
Turn your headlights on! And 
be sure you have two head- 
lights, two tail-lights, and two 
stop lights. 

Workers thanked 

I want to congratulate the 
Ingleside Post Office because 
they've given excellent service. 
I hate to see post office workers 
be criticized as often as they 
are. We have wonderful ones 
here in Long Lake. 

Congrats, freshmen 

I would like to congratulate the 
Grant freshman football team 
on their conference champi- 
onship this year. They were fun 
to watch. They had a great sea- 
son. Both coaches should be 
congratulated for their effort. 
This can only mean great teams 
in the future. 

Killing the trees 

I couldn't believe what the 
Mundelein Development 

Center is doing on Seymour 
and Lake streets. They're 
putting in trees along the park- 
ing lot. They're burying the 
trees in asphalt and covering 
them up in dirt. They're not 
opening the ball of the tree on 
the top, not cutting the strings, 
and they expect roots to go 
down into asphalt. I can't 
believe it. Being in horticul- 
ture, I know this is wrong. You 
have to have a big enough hole 
so that the roots go down into 
the ground. I can't believe my 
taxes are being wasted for 
these trees that won't even last 
two years. 

Congested 

Is there anyone as upset as I am 



about the traffic congestion on , 
Route 59 and Wilson Road? 
The light changes way too fast 
and causes major traffic delays, 
especially at rush hour. Do 
something! 

Think first 

Fall is here and the stench of 
fireplace smoke is in the air. 
Many people with allergies and 
sinus trouble are suffering. Use 
your wood fireplace only occa- 
sionally and think about all the 
pollution you're causing. It's 
much more efficient to use gas 
or electric heat. You're fooling 
yourself if you think it's 
nature's way. It's very polluting 
and causes acid rain. The 
chemicals burning in your 
home aren't good for your chil- 
dren, either. 

Great Halloween 

Hats off to Second Federal 
Savings Bank in Fox Lake for 
their wonderful Halloween 
party and haunted house. 
Thanks especially to Elise, for 
great activities there and for let- 
ting me be a ghost. 

Can't please everyone 

I'm replying to the Oct. 25 
Lipservice comments, "Don't 
join league." I've learned a 
long time ago that you can't 
please everybody. This is notT- 
ball or in-house soccer. We 
play in the Northwest Football 
League with nine other larger 
communities, none of which 
have equal playing time rules. 
Any coach in a traveling league 
that is not trying to win for his 
team is not worth a grain of 
salt. Yes, I'm very proud of our 
friend, who happens to be a 
millionaire. He and his wife 
have donated many things. But 
they donate something more 
precious than money — time. 
Both have put in many hours. 
We have numerous parents 
contributing time and money 
to make this a successful com- 
munity program. A player's 
playing time would be 
increased as he gains experi- 
ence and confidence. But he 
must come to practice regular- 
ly, properly equipped and 
ready to pay attention, and not 
get into altercations with his 
teammates. You had an oppor- 
tunity to address the board at 
an open meeting and you 
chose not to. — Rick Johnson, 
president, Lake Villa Township 
Youth Football 

What experience? 

I'd like to say it's amazing Greg 
Castillo, the new trustee for 
Round Lake Heights, is using 
all of his zoning board experi- 
ence in his new job when he 
was only on the zoning board 
for six months. 

Disturbing vote 

I know the time we have trick- 
or-treating is not a major issue, 
but one trustee's attitude I find 
very disturbing. Darwin 



Foil man chose not to vote on 
the issue because he neither 
has children or grandchildren 
that would participate. What 
kind of garbage is this? Does 
this mean he only votes for 
things that affect him? I have 
found this to be a problem in 
Fox Lake. A trustee is voted in 
to represent the people, not 
their personal issues. Do the 
residents know that our trustees 
don't have an ethics code? 
Certain ones believe they don't 
need to follow any ethics at all. 

Good to know 

I read that Tim Osmond 
announced he's running for 
supervisor of Antioch 
Township, following in Jim 
Fields' footsteps. It's good to 
know he'll be a do-nothing, the 
same as Fields. 

Tacky look 

Regarding the comments about 
the people who received a vio- 
lation notice to remove their 
boat from their driveway, I 
think it's pretty tacky for a boat 
to be parked in the driveway. 
According to ordinance, since 
we don't have association fees, 
I believe boats aren't allowed 
to be parked on the grass, but 
the driveway's okay (unless 
they've changed it). I don't 
think it looks nice. I think our 
property values would go 
down if everyone did this. 

Don't want junk 

I live in Fox Lake and was won- 
dering if the mayor has ever 
noticed the large junkyard on 
Fremont Road. Maybe he'd like 
one next to his home or down 
the road from his house? We 
sure don't. 

In the mail? 

I'd like to know why everyone 
wasn't invited to the Round 
Lake High School class reunion 
of 1976. I graduated that year 
. and never received an invita- 
tion, nor any announcements 
in the paper looking for people. 
I would have loved to have 
gone since I was out of town 
for my 10th year reunion. Was 
it just a select few that were 
invited? 

Rule breaker 

To the person who wants to 
keep his 1 6-foot boat in the dri- 
veway, calling his neighbor a 
coward. If the neighbor came 
to you saying you were in vio- 
lation, what would you do? 
You'd probably tell them to 
jump in the lake. If you're in 
violation of an ordinance and 
ignore it, it shows your disre- 
spect for your neighbors. I'm 
sick of people like you who 
think they can break any rules 
you don't like. Your neighbor 
shouldn't have to confront you 
on it. 

Noise saves lives 

To the lady and others who 
complain about train noise. 



You don't have to live there. 
The train whistles help to save 
lives, so we should be more 
thankful to those who try to 
enforce safety for us all. 

Call the police 

I'm calling about the people 
with the cat problem. Call and 
see if there's a free-roaming 
animal ordinance. Inform the 
police and file a complaint. _. 
The police will have to follow 
through. 

Stop burning leaves 

I'd like to ask whoever it is who 
is burning leaves to stop. 
There's so many people who 
have respiratory illnesses. 
Please care about your neigh- 
bors and dispose of your leaves 
in another way. 

We won't pay 

Hey, "Fix curb" — Antioch 
should fix the curb at Main and 
Lake, but it's ridiculous for you 
to blame a town for your 
father's clumsiness. When will 
people be responsible for their 
own actions? Hey, residents of 
Antioch, do you want your tax 
dollars to pay for another 
man's clumsiness? You'd better - 
speak up! 

Getting the shaft 

Since the vets are going to put 
a $2 surcharge on our pet 
licenses, the cost of the license 
should go down by $2. Before, 
70,000 registered licenses paid 
for the Lake County employ- 
ees, didn't they? It sounds like 
they're shafting us again. 

Stop violators 

There's still a bunch of cars out 
here in Island Lake that still 
don't have vehicle stickers. It 
says there's a $500 fine. I wish 
the police commissioner or vil- 
lage board would take care of 
this and start stopping people. 

Appreciate coverage 

I'm calling about a supplement 
called "Discover Lake County" 
in the News Sun. I was very • 
upset that they left out a whole 
village — Volo. I feel this is an 
insult that we were not recog- 
nized in a paper that supposed- 
ly covers Lake County. We 
deserve an apology. We appre- 
ciate the coverage that 
Lakeland has given us over the 
years and wish other publica- 
tions would do as well. 

Benefitting Pappas 

This is in answer to the "Look 
into records" comments in 
Lipservice Nov. 1. Jim Pappas' 
self-reported front-page expose of 
the Rollins Road park was only 
one more of his frequent free 
campaign mayoral strategies. 
Come on people, do you really 
think that the gas and so on 
should have come out of Trustee 
Thillen's pocket? What we have 
to thank Pappas for is one more 
attention-getting gain to benefit » 
himself. Think again, folks. 



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fjfl LAKELIFE LaIceIancI Newspapers NovEMbER 1 5, 1 996 









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Presents the 



Dream 
Vacation, 



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In all, there are six different Dream Vacation destinations. Here's how you 
can win one of these fabulous trips... 

• Listen to lake County's 102.3-XLC for all six vacations. 

• Fill out the entry form below. Be sure to include the vacation and it's 
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• Be sure to circle the vacation you want to win. 

• Mail your entry to WXLC Dream Vacation 3250 Belvidere Road, Waukegan, IL 

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• You must be 21 to enter. 

Dream Vacation #1 



Jamaica**. 

Trip Includes; 

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> Trip includes all meals, 
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Dream Vacation #2 
Dominican, Repn&lic... 

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• Trip includes all meals and 
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• Trip Value is $2,500 plus 
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Dream Vacation #3 
Mexico.** 

Trip Includes ; 

• Round trip airfare. 

• 4 Nights at the Caribbean Village 
Cancan and 3 nights at the Caribbean* 
Piafocar Golf and Beach Club 

• Trip includes all meals and 
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• Trip Value is $2,800 plus $1 ,000 

in spending money from WXLCt 



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The Bahamas. ** 

Trip Includes ; 

• Round trip airfare 

• 7 Nights at Sandals Royal 

Bahamian Resort and Spa 

• Trip includes all meals and 
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• Trip Value is $4,000 plus 
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Dream Vacation #5 



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When you have all six vacations, circle the 
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County Board Chairman Bob Depke presides over his last regular 
meeting of the Lake County Board Nov. 12. After more than 30 
years in politics, Depke has chosen to retire in April. He leaves 
the county board Dec. 1 and the post of Warren Twp. supervisor 
April 1 .— Photo by Linda Chapman 



COUNTY 



ANTieCH PUBLIC LIBRARY DISTRICT 

787 N, Main 8toefitbEn 1 5, 1996 Utelmd Newspapers COUNTY 

AlUiQctJL 



Friends, foes praise Depke as last of a breed 

CTCVC DCTCDcniLi _"' 




STEVE PETERS ON 
Staff Reporter 



From street corners to club meetings to the 
backrooms of village halls, the biggest indication of political leader," Welton said. 



He is an example for everyone - he has a tremen- 
dous career record of accomplishment. We all have 
our own style, his is a more powerful, a strong 



the political winds of 
change in Lake County in 
three decades continues 
to have fallout. 

Ousted county board 
chairman Bob Depke is 
leaving politics for good 
with the announcement 
he will not seek reelection 
as the Warren Twp. 
Supervisor a post he has 
held since 1961. 

Long-time political 
ally Richard Welton, mayor of Gurnee, praised 
Depke's decades of service. 

"He exhibited a tremendous desire to help peo- 
ple and to work with people and get things done. 



'Bob was the last of a breed. He 

stands up there with Robert 

Sabonjian and Richard J. Daley. 

They don't make them like that 

anymore. ' 

— Suzanne Simpson 



An early December 
retirement roast is 
planned in Depke's 
honor at the same place 
he announced his retire- 
ment - Midlane County 
Club. 

Depke was perhaps best 
in his element at making 
large-scale deals and 
dealing with factions 
such as a senior citizen 
Christmas party to selling 

Christmas trees for Gagewood Lions Club. 

"The facilities at the township center are second 

to none and Bob deserves a lot of credit. He set in 

See DEPKE page C3 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



\h 



THIS WEEK 

Educational 
offerings 

Gain degree in 
engineering without 
leaving the county " 
PAGEC2 



Police respond 
to unrest 

Tech campus situation 
not as volatile as first 
believed 
PAGEC5 

Viewpoint 

Real 

'soccer 

moms' 

disdain 

political 

category 

PACE C4 




Tax man 
cometh 




Don 

Taylor tells 
you ways 
to save 
your 
small 
business 
PAGE C6 



This Way to 
Wealth 

How to elevate 

■ • ■ . 

retirement needs 
PAGEC8 



Flooding solutions threaten preserves 



ELIZABETH EAKEN 

Staff Reporter * 

If the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE) has their way, several 
of the Lake County Forest Preserves top recreational sites will be 
under water to alleviate downstream flooding along the Des Plaines 
River. 

Up to 75 percent of the $73.4 million project would be funded by 
the federal government if a plan can be agreed upon by local resi- 
dents and municipalities. The remainder will be worked out as part of 

an ongoing study. 
' The ACOE has been working 
since the early 1980s on the plan 
to alleviate flooding along the 
river but the majority of the pro- 
jects' benefits would be realized 
by Cook County rather than 
Lake County. 

"True, that's often what hap- 
pens in flood control and water- 
shed projects," Sarah Bennet, 
ACOE study manager explained 
of the unequal benefits. "That's 
the nature of the beast . . ." 

In the plan, several lateral storage areas for storrnwater would be 
created along with the construction of reservoirs and levees. In Lake 
County eight of the sites would be located on forest preserve land and 
See FLOODING pageC2 



'The trails are already in; 
we awarded a contract 
for an architect today. 
We've been looking at 
this project for years/ 

Steven Messerli, 
Lake County Forest Preserves 




Space maker 

Parking garage attendant Don Kiesgen Sr. of Ingleside waits 
on Lois Veenhuis of Lake Villa during the first day of opera- 
tions at the long-awaited Lake County parking garage. More 
than a year in construction, the garage on County Street 
opened for business Nov. 12. The County Board placed a 
time capsule in the garage as part of the dedication ceremo- 
ny. — photo by Linda Chapman 



Average Annual Damages 

Lake County | Cook County 




Board debates: How 
many pets are too many? 

RHONDA HETR1CK BURKE 

Editor in Chief 

There are limits on pet ownership, at least in Lake County. 

After a lengthy discussion, Lake County Board members passed 
an animal control ordinance which dictates leash length and the 
number of animals allowed per lot sizes in unincorporated Like 

County. 

The Lake County Board of Health has been working with veteri- 
narians, the state's attorney's office and the law enforcement officials 
to draft the ordinance for over a year. 

"We tried to strike a balance," said Dale Galassie, executive director 
of the Lake County Health Department. "This gives us the teeth to deal 
with irresponsible home- 
owners." 

Under the ordinance, 
pet limitations per lot 
size are: 

• 1/2 acre or less- 
three dogs, three cats 
maximum 

• 1/2 acre to 1 1/2 
acres- four dogs, four 
cats maximum 

Several citizens spoke at the county board meeting both for and 
against pet number limitations. 

Several residents in unincorporated Lake Bluff have experienced 
problems with a pack of chows, seven in all, owned by a neighbor liv- 
ing on a less than 1 acre lot. 

"Unfortunately, this ordinance will be grandfathered," said 
Galassie. "So, people like this who already have a large number of 
animals will be allowed to keep them. But as they lose animals due to 



Under the ordinance pet 
limitations per lot size are: 

• 1/2 acre or less- three dogs, 
three cats maximum 

* 1/2 acre to V 1/2 acres- four 
dogs, four cats maximum 



_! . .See DEBATES page C2 



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COUNTY UkElANd Newspapers NovEMben 1-5, 1996 



Flooding— 

From page CI 

would have a significant impact on 

those areas. 

Steven Messerli, executive 
director of die forest preserve, said 
the corps' plan was totally oblivious 
to the uses of Sterling Lake in 
Wadsworth. Under the plan the 
lake would increase in size, putting 
the recreational paths and shelters 
surrounding it under water. 

Independence Grove, the forest 
preserve's newest gem which is still 
under development, would be 
almost wiped out by the project. 

Messerli was upset that the for- 
est preserve has been cooperatively 
working with the corps for three 
years on the Libertyville Estates 
flood control project and hasn't 
sought their input on this plan 
before now. The plan would put the 
already installed foundations and 
planned structures at the site under 
water, the same as the plan for 
Sterling Lake. 

"They want to store an addi- 
tional 12 feet of water," Messerli 
said of the Independence Grove 
plan. "The trails are already in; we 
awarded a contract for an architect 
today. We've been looking at this 
project for years." 

Bennet explained the study is in 



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Has useful gifts and helpful 
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Antioch 
Joretta Jan 

838-3430 395-0783 



Fox Lake/ 

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Jennifer Glenda 

740-3630 587-6015 



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Kim Linda 

566-9536 223-1607 



Gurnee 

Lori Holly 

548-8740 625-2388 



its infancy and the public and locals 
will have an opportunity to give 
input. The plan was put together to 
provide the most cost effective way 
to alleviate the flooding. 

"We have to come up with the 
most cost-effective site and 
Independence Grove was already 
excavated," she explained. 
According to her, this is what's 
required by the federal government 
when preparing the study to apply 
for project funding. 

The majority of the sites were 
chosen because they already are 
low lying or need minimal excava- 
tion. One privately-owned site 
encompassing 184 acres to the 
south of Wadsworth Road and west 
of Delaney Road was chosen 
because it is planned to be excavat- 
ed for a quarry so the corps would- 
n't need to excavate the site them- 
selves. 

The study at this point is being 
presented to the local municipali- 
ties, and agencies for input. The 
Illinois Office of Water Resources 
(OWR) an agency within the state 
Department of Natural Resources 
is working with the locals involved 
to come up with an alternative plan 
called the Locally Preferred Plan 
(LPP). 

Input of comments to the OWR 
are to be submitted by January 1, 
1997, and the OWR's LPP needs to 
be finalized by March 1 to be sub- 
mitted to the corps. At the begin- 
ning of May the ACOE will then give 
the municipalities and public the 
opportunity to comment on the 
plan. 

Bennet said the plan is on such 
a fast track to get funding because 
the corps wants to control the 
flooding. 

"Hie corps spent seven years 
putting their plan together and we 
get Jess than 60 days to put ours 
together," commented Messerli. 

Brian Wozniak of the OWR said 
they are working to modify the 
corps' plan to get die same amount 
of benefits in a way the locals pre- 
fer. 

"The corps did an analysis of 50 
storage and 40 levy sites. Basically 
the others fell out so it may be 
tough to find additional sites," 
Wozniak explained. He said they 
don't have a feel for the area as the 
locals do, so by consulting with 
them they will hopefully come up 
with preferred sites. 



Lake Villa 
Lindenhurst 

Deanna 
265-0608 



Libertyville 

Green Oaks 

Donna Debbie 

263-8339 223-1168 



Long Grove 

Kildeer 

Hawthorn Woods 

Mary 

438-0287 



Round Lake 
Area 

Kathy p am 

395-1598 546-1564 



Vernon Hills 

Doris 
680-7276 



You are entitled to a compli- 
mentary subscription from 
your hometown newspaper. 
To receive your paper, contact 
your Welcome Wagon repre- 
sentative or call Lakeland 
Newspapers at (847) 223- 
8161. For information about 
positions with the Welcome 
Wagon call Marina at (847) 
729-9817. 




Remembering our Veterans 

James Dorsey, a Sociology teacher at the College of Lake County, places a wreath during the 
Veterans Day Memorial Ceremony held on campus. — Photo by Linda Chapman 




Debates — 

From page CI 

death or ownership change they 
will have to comply with mini- 
mums." 

Additionally, the ordinance 
provides that residents of multi- 
family dwellings such as condo- 
miniums, apartments and town- 
homes, will have to abide by the 
rules of their landlords or home- 
owner's association in determining 
the number of pets allowed per 
household. 

According to Galassie, there are 
70,000 registered dogs and cats in 
Lake County today. According to 
figures presented by a volunteer at 
the county animal shelters, nearly 
10,000 animals were brought to 
county shelters last year alone. She 
rallied for a litter registration fee. 

The leash length is 5 feet and 
several county board members 
argued that it was impossible to 
regulate a standard length that is 
appropriate for use with all breeds 
of dogs. 

The ordinance will give the ani- 
mal warden the right to check living 
The bottom line, according to conditions of pets and allows him 
all the agencies involved, is if those the recourse to pick up any animals 
involved can't agree on a locally off the owners' property, 
preferred plan, the project will die. The wording of dangerous and 

******** 

To my friends in the 3 1st District, 

After sewing you for nearly 
24 years, I was fortunate this 
past election to not have an 
opponent. 
I am grateful for your support 
and appreciation of my work as your state senator 
and I thank you for all of your efforts on my he- 
half. 
May all of you have very pleasant and safe 
Thanksgiving holidays. 

Sincerely,^ 

Senator Adeline Gco-Karis 

******** 



vicious in the ordinance in dealing being irresponsible." 
with an unruly pet has also been 
more clearly defined to allow legal 
action against an owner and its pet. 

County board members 
including Judy Martini (R-Antioch) 
and Suzi Schmidt (R-Lake Villa) 
argued that it wasn't the county's 
place to regulate the number of 
pets responsible owners should be 
able to keep. They favored tougher 
language and enforcement against 
irresponsible pet owners. 

"We are punishing responsi- 
ble pet owners," said Martini. 
"There is a difference between 
keeping five show dogs and 



Board of Health member Colin 
McRae said adoption of the ordi- 
nance was a step in the right direc- 
tion. 

"We have given a lot of time to 
the ordinance," he said. "It is 
important to deal with the prob- 
lems. It is a big improvement of the 
current situation. It is not perfect 
but it is much better." 

The board approved the ordi- 
nance with 18-3. Schmidt, Martini 
and Diana O'Kelly (R-Mundelein 
voted against it saying it should 
return to committee for strength- 
ening- 



Earn an engineering degree 
without leaving the county? 



RHONDA HETRICK BURKE 






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Editor in Chief . 

For Lake County residents who want to attend the University ot 
Illinois engineering school in the evenings , but can't afford to uproot 
their family- they may soon be able to do so without leaving the 
county. 

Proposals from five universities to offer programs at a multi-uni- 
versity center in Lake County are currently being studied by Dr. 
Charles Evans of the University of Illinois, who helped to establish a 
similar center in DuPage County five years ago. 

"The purpose of a multi-university center is to attempt to provide 
a coordinated effort through several universities to offer more under- 
graduate and graduate courses and completion programs for local 
residents," said Evans. 

The programs proposed by the five universities differ greatly from 
what is currently offered in Lake County, today, according to Evans. 
"We don't want to duplicate programs which already exist," he 
said. "The programs being proposed included such majors as engi- 
neering and offerings in technology, science and health care that are 
not currently available." 

Evans says the multi-university center is an increasingly popular 
option for learning institutions because technology allows students 
to attend lectures via computer links and to interact electronically for 
classroom work. 

The multi-university center would likely be housed in available 
space around the county including classroom space at the College of 
Lake County. 

"We would probably have multiple locations because of the lake 
corridor and more rural areas of Lake County," Evans said. "This is 
not an idea that has happened overnight, we have beeh'working on it 
for many years." »■ 

The five state institutions submitting proposals for the multi uni- 
versity center include: Northeastern Illinois, Southern Illinois, the 
University of Illinois, Governors State and Northern Illinois. 

"The program has been very successful in DuPage County," said 
Evans. "What we have seen in the past five years is that some learn- 
ing institutions come and go from the program, others open their 
own satellite offices in the area." 

She added that CLC supports any opportunity for increased 
course offerings at the graduate and baccalaureate level. 

The State Board of Higher Education funded a grant in September 
to study the creation of a multi-university center in Lake County. 

Course offerings from the five institutions could be available by 
January. 



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Car chase ends in fatality 

_ LINDENHURST-A Waukegan man was killed after 
his vehicle collided with a tree while trying to 'allude 

Undenhurst police officers. < 
Dead is Arin Peterson, 
20, whosevehicle 
burst into flames. 
He was trapped 
inside the vehicle 
and was unable to 
be removed. He 
was taken to 
Lutheran General 
p Hospital by a Flight- 

oOUNTy for-Life helicopter 

where he was pro- 
nounced dead shortly after. 
According to police, the chase 
started after the officer noticed the 
Lincoln Mark 7 driven by Peterson 
traveling at a high rate of speed. He was followed by 
police and made a U-tum at Deep Lake Road. The offi- 
cer estimated the speed to be at least 90 mph. He 
swerved to miss a vehicle, lost control of the car and 
struck the tree. The passenger, a 14-year-old Antioch 
girl, was sent to St. Therese Medical Center. Her 
injuries were not deemed serious. — by ALEC JUNGE 

Twp. supervisor to resign 

HARRINGTON— State Rep.-elect Mark H. Beaubien 
Jr. (R-Barrington) has announced he will resign as 
supervisor of Cuba Township at a 
meeting to be reconvened on Monday, 
Nov. 18. 

'T want to dedicate my efforts to the 
State Legislature," Beaubien said, "and 
also it is my belief from my perspective it 
would be a conflict to hold both posi- 
tions." 

Beaubien was elected to represent 
the 52nd district in the State House in 
a landslide election Nov. 5, receiving 25,875 votes, rep- 
resenting 65 percent. His opponent Robert Boness (D- 
Round Lake Beach) receiving 13,789 votes or 35 per- 
cent. 

"Being the State Legislator is enough," he said. 
Cuba Township's regular monthly meeting an 
Thursday, Nov. 14 is beirtg reconvened for the benefit 
of having the new trustee arid Beaubien's successor 
present. 

Beaubien said he would issue a news release Nov. 
18 indicating who his successor is, as well as who will 
be appointed to serve the remaining term of former 
Cuba Township Trustee Stevenson Mountsier, who was 
elected to the Lake County Board Nov. 5.— by 
SPENCER SCHEIN 

Village, railroads sued 

ANTIOCH— A class action lawsuit filed in Lake 
County seeks a court injunction to force Wisconsin 
Central and Metra to stop blowing their horns at 
Antioch's six grade crossings. Seven complainants 
allege the village is not enforcing a nuisance ordinance. 
They claim the train's horns are 95 decibels or above 
100 feet away. Dan Duggan, representing the group, 
feels they have a legally defensible case. They contend 
the railroads have been excused from blowing the whis- 



Novemder 15 , 1996 UkclANd Newspapers COUNTY 




Beaubien 




vV. 



ties in Antioch since 1994. The complainants hope they 
can get the injunction in place so they can pursue the 
matter with federal officials. Mayor Marilyn Shineflug 
declined comment until after the village receives a copy 
of the lawsuit.— by ALEC JUNGE 

Festival of trees starts soon 

WADSWORTH— Victory Hospital Foundation's 
Festival of Trees to benefit the Cardiac Services depart- 
ment will begin Thursday Nov. 21 and run through 
Sunday Nov. 24 at Midlane Country Club. Last year the 
festival raised over $73,000 for the hospital. 

This is the fifth year the festival has been presented 
and will feature 50 decorated Christmas trees. The trees 
are donated by area businesses and organizations. 
Volunteers from various groups decorate them and are 
judged by visitors of the festival. 

Many of the trees are raffled off including all the 
trimmings, some are sold and at the preview party on 
Nov. 21 a few will be auctioned off. In addition wreaths 
will also be available for purchase and raffle varying in 
size. 

Other attractions include a gift shop of holiday relat- 
ed items, crafts, live entertainment, a bake sale and 
.Frosty's Fantasyland which offers an activity area with 
crafts and games for children. The festival is being 
held at Midlane Country Club located at 4555 
Yorkhouse Road. Hours are Thursday Nov. 21 through 
Saturday Nov. 23 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Sunday Nov. 24 10 
a.m.-5 p.m. Tickets are $3 for adults, $2 for seniors and 
$1.50 for children age 3-12. For more information call 
360-4246— by ELIZABETH EAKEN 



—Quote of tIhe w/eeIc 



'Lake County is a slice of Americana. If 

you want to see what is going on across 

the nation look at people right here in 

Lake County. We have it all from the very 

rich to the very poor, the factory workers 

and the professionals. Every walk of life 

is represented in Lake County.' 

Bob Jacobs 
Lit' -tyvilleTwp. Democratic Party chair 



Thanksgivers celebrate 

, ISLANDIAKE— A number of families have got- 
ten together to help needy individuals and "orphans 
of the holidays" have a happy Thanksgiving dinner. 
The Thanksgivers of Island Lake joined together 
in September as a non-profit organization out to 
benefit the local needy and families without nearby 

relatives. 

Tom and Mary Jo Martin are "holiday orphans," 
and have spent the past several holidays working in 
Chicago soup kitchens to help others. 

Instead of going downtown again, they decided 
to help those less fortunate in the Wauconda and 
Island Lake area, and created the group. 

Now with 16 members, the group has received 
donations from several community organizations 
and company's. The dinner will be held at Cotton 



Creek School in Island Lake on Thanksgiving Day — 
by SPENCER SCHEIN 

Buckle up for holiday safety 

ROUND LAKE BEACH— Police will have increased 
efforts in effect to remind motorists of safely belt usage, 
driving sober and obeying posted speed limits over the 
holiday season. 

The Village of Round Lake Beach is starting the sec- 
ond phase of its Traffic Enforcement Grant, received 
from the Illinois Department of Transportation. The 
phase begins Nov. 17 through Nov. 30. The first seat 
belt study indicated 60 percent of drivers in compliance 
with seat belt usage. It is the Round Lake Beach police 
department's intention to improve the compliance to 
70 percent during the holiday season. — STAEF 
REPORT 

Christmas drive under way 

KILDEER— The 17th Annual Kildeer Christmas 
Drive is well under way, with collections of clothing 
already being received. 

Tom Longeway, a long-time resident and former vil- - 
lage trustee, is once again coordinating the drive, with 
all clothes going to St. Joseph's Church in Waukegan, 
where they are given to needy families. 

Five drop off locations are now available to collect 
any and all donations. All clothing should be cleaned, ■ 
washed and ready to use. If possible, clothes should be 
separated by boys, mens, girls and womens. Shoes and 
gloves should be tied together. 

All the clothing will remain in Lake County to help 
"the families of St. Joseph Church in Waukegan. The 
drive also accepts food and money. 

Longeway will collect all the donations on Dec. 7, 
and bring them to the church the next day. 

The drive is under the blessing and sponsorship of 
the Village of Kildeer and began 17 years ago when the 
Longeway family had children that had outgrown good 
clothes, and there was no place to give them away. 

At the time, Longeway was a village trustee, and he 
convinced the village board to sponsor a clothing drive. 
Now 17 years later, Longeway safd they are looking for 
their best drive ever. 

For further information, contact Longeway at 382- 
1 130.— by SPENCER SCHEIN 

* 

Theater offers $1.50 shows 

VERNON HILLS— Lake County moviegoers will be 
graced with $1.50 shows as a new eight-screen theater 
opens in Vernon Hills this weekend. Not only will 
Kerasotes Theatres Showplace offer $1.50 shows, 
patrons will get free refills on all sizes of popcorn and 
soft drinks at its concession stands. "The free refills are 
really popular. It makes for a really good bargain. It's 
one of our signature items," noted John Miller, general 
manager- of Kerasotes Theatres. 

Kerasotes Theatres, operated by the Kerasotes fami- 
ly since 1909, runs nearly 100 theatres across the 
Midwest, the Vernon Hills location will- include a cafe 
which will offer espresso and cappuccino drinks, 
gourmet coffee, as well as a variety of pastries and 
candy. In addition, allauditoriums are equipped with 
dynamic digital stereo sound systems. The new theater 
is located north of Route 60 on Milwaukee Avenue.— by 
KEVIN HANRAHAN 



Police Officers make presence Depke 

From oase CI 



known at County Tech Camp 



TINA LYNN SW1ECH 

Staff Reporter 

The Lake County Area 
Technology Campus institu- 
tional coordinator called it "a 
case of overkill on the student's 
part." 

Though police officers from 
five different departments 
made their presence known at 
the school last week, no riots 
ensued, and nothing got out of 
hand. 

Jeff Brierton, coordinator 
for the school adjacent to the 
Lake County College, 
explained the officers were 
called after parents went to the 
Grayslake Police Department 
and complained about a threat 
their son received from anoth- 
er student. 



"There had been rumors 
there might be difficulty with 
the students," Brierton said. 
The issue was even discussed at 
the regular Lake County Gang 
Task Force meeting, 

A few days prior to the Nov. 
6 incident which brought the 
officers on guard, two male stu- 
dents allegedly exchanged 
some harsh words. Two 

sources claim the initial inci- 
dent had some possible racial 
overtones. However, "No one 
was disciplined, no one was 
reprimanded," said Brierton. 
"It was our feeling this was not 
so serious." 

When the band of law 
enforcement officials arrived, 
the school was quiet. "They 
[officersl wanted to have a cer- 



tain level of visibility here," 
Brierton stated. 

Officers asked by the 
Grayslake Police Department to 
participate included those from 
Round Lake, Round Lake 
Beach, Round Lake Park and 
Hainesville. 

"We welcome the precau- 
tions," said the campus coor- 
dinator. He noted this was an 
isolated incident in the histo- 
ry of the campus. "We have 
been consistently trouble-free 
and we intend to remain that 

way." 

The school boasts teaching 
1,200 students per day who are 
bussed in from various schools 
throughout Lake and McHenry 
counties to receive the hands- 
on technical training. 



From page CI 

place a lot of the programs and most are run by volunteers, Welton 

said. 

Welton, who is seeking re-election, said he has not met with the 
two people seeking the supervisor's role - Suzanne Simpson or Robert 
Kofler. "I am sure we will all work together with the township in the 
future," Welton said. 

Admitting surprise at Depke's decision, Welton summed up what 
life will be like after April 2. After some time off, a consulting role 
could be in Depke's future.' 

"I can't fathom a Warren Township without Depke," Welton said. 

"We can work with anybody, but it will be a big loss for Warren 
Township. The facilities and the programs are second to none in the 
state," James Hayner, Gurnee village administrator, said. 

Russ Gwaltney, Gurnee area Realtor: "1 hate to see him go - he has 
done a lot for Warren Twp." ( . 

Wayne Schurter, Gurnee Dist. 56 school superintendent: "change 
is a fact of life in schools and communities. You have to roll with it. 
Bob has been supportive of the schools and we wish him well in 
retirement. We will work with his replacement." 

His replacement will be working for a lesser salary - $30,000, a cut 
of $27,000 in a move in the final months engineered by Depke. 
"Bob was the last of a breed. He is stands up there with Robert 
Sabonjian and Richard J. Daley. They don't make them like that any- 
more," Simpson said. 



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EDITORIAL L\kElANd Newspapers NovEMbEn 15, 1996 



Split ballots aid 
two-party view 

It may be a bit premature for Lake County Democratic 
Chairman Terry Link to lead the chorus singing, "Happy Days 
are Here Again," but there's no denying that the 1996 general 
election was a big boost to the two-party system in particular 
-and a giant kick in Republican pants in general. 

Link was a personal beneficiary of a big surge of Democratic 
voting Nov. 5, winning a Senate seat in the General Assembly. 
Democrats also held a Lake County House district and pro- 
pelled Mary Ellen Vanderventer into the Recorder of Deeds 
post, not exactly a high profile position, but a county-wide 
office just the same. 

Lake County Republicans are licking their wounds over the 
fact that President Olinton edged Bob Dole by a sliver and that 
they failed to carry the county for a homegrown candidate for 
U.S. Senate. Liberal Democrat Dick Durbin edged Al Salvi by 
three-tenths of a percent, amazing in face of the county's repu- 
tation as solid GOP turf. 

Split balloting told the story. The county's split tickets 
totalled 126,624 as compared to the combined Democratic- 
Republican straight total of 61,561. There was a respective 
turnout of 70.13 percent of the eligible registered voters. 

The failures of the GOP will be analyzed for a long time. 
Demographic changes and the disfavor of female and moderate 
Republicans with the top of the ticket were as evident here as 
elsewhere. What is significant is Link's evaluation that voting 
Democratic is now "respectible" in once rock-ribbed 
Republican territory and the fact that recruiting Democratic 
candidates for county office in future elections will be easier. 

Another significant observation was County Republican 
Chairman John Schulien's grudging admission that there are a 
lot of "closet Democrats" in the county's growing number of 
independents who split their tickets as a matter of course. A 
healthy two-party system is a great tonic for good government. 

Monorail system 
not pie-in-the sky 

For imaginative municipal planning and sheer audacity, no 
Lake County community comes close to the Village of Gurnee. 
Vernon Hills is a distant second. 

Gurnee Mayor Dick Wei ton' now has neighbors rubbing their 
eyes trying to picture his vision of a tree-top monorail system 
linking Six Flags Great America, Gurnee Mills, a soon-to-be full- 
service hotel and conference center and a series of down-the- 
road office parks. There may even be a professional sports 
franchise in the future of the county's fast growing community. 

The way Welton sees it, some of the major pieces already are 
in place — a giant shopping center and a big amusement park. 
Remind you a little of Disney World? Mayor Welton' observes 
soberly, "We have some similarities with Florida." Welton says 
snickering will stop when the cost of a monorail system is com- 
pared with building new highways. 

All aboard. Direct service to the Magic Kingdom! 



Letters to the EcTitor 



Campaign mudsling 

Editor: 

* Lake County has never 
been known for clean political 
campaigns but the campaign 
between State Rep. Tom 
■ Lachner and Democrat Terry 
Link for the Senate seat along 
the shore have reached new 
lows for political campaigns in 
Lake County. 

Each of these candidates 
have rightly accused the other of 
being mudslingers whose cam- 
paignshave been filled with half- 
truths and out-and-out mud- 
slinging. Both of these candidates 
have littered our countryside 
with far more signs than any 
campaign needed. 

Regardless of who was the 
better candidate or who gets 
elected let's eliminate campaigns 
of this nature from our political 
scene. They are both a couple of 
mudslingers who have disgraced 
the American political system 
with their lies, half-truths and out 
and out bunk. In my estimation, 
just about, every thing that has 



L L/ I I \J 1 \ I /% L Newspapers 



-ViEwpoiiNi^— 

Real soccer moms 
disdain categories 




come out of their campaigns 
have been manushi. 

Laurence Januz 
Lake Forest 

Staff recognized 

Editor: 

With November being 
National Hospice Month, I want- 
ed to take a moment to acknowl- 
edge the great work being done 
by the Hospice of Northeastern 
Illinois. 

When my husband's illness 
was deemed terminal and he 
became too ill for me to care for 
by myself, I never felt alone. 
Hospice staff helped take him to 
the hospital when he was wheel 
chair-bound and stayed with him 
so I could get a break from taking 
care of him and run my errands. 
Hospice volunteers always 
brought him cookies or ice cream 
or brought something like flowers 
that we could both enjoy. They 
were always thoughtful. 

Because of the Hospice of 
Northeastern Illinois, I was able 
. See LETTERS page C5 



BILL SCHROEDER . 

Publisher 

All those tv talking heads and people who write 
columns have been wringing their hands and 
scratching their heads about the impact of the "soc- 
cer mom" vote. Did they decide the outcome of the 
fall general election? 

I choose not to wring my hands or scratch my head. 
Rather, it was necessary to check out the source. Or 
as they say in yuppie circles, "Cut to the chase." 
Does anyone really talk like that? 

Well, it seemed logical to chat with some moms of 
soccer players, "soccer moms" if you will. Buffy, 
Tammy and Melodi, three moms of soccer players, 
volunteered to assist this voice in the wilderness 
about who they are, what they think and what they 
do. I'm indebted to them. So, Buff, Tarn and Mel, 
let's have at it. 

Moms like soccer, the trio agreed, because the 
game is easy for them to understand and is fun for 
their kids because it involves running and kicking. 
All children like to run and kick. Soccer isn't boring 
like Little League baseball, violent and restrictive (so 
many practices and plays) like junior football and 
inhibiting to non-athletes like basketball. 

While their offspring are running and kicking, Buff, 
Tarn and Mel said that game days offer excellent 
opportunities to catch up on town gossip, get the 
latest skinny on child rearing and coordinate the 
current charily drive, school busing protest or tot lot 
refurbishing. 

Since the kids are occupied for the moment, our 
expert informants admitted somewhat sheepishly 
that game days also are excellent forums for one- 
upping pals with their husband's latest promotion, 
house redecorating plans or whether they'll be "ski- 
ing Aspen" or "getting tan at a cute little Carribean 
beach place" this winter. 

Buff, Tarn and Mel bridled at the suggestion that 
soccer moms are overly status conscious, too 
intense about education or self-absorbed in person- 
al dieting and health club workouts. "We're total 
persons, individuals," they sniffed. "Home man- 
agers, child rearers; we hold part-time jobs, we're 
community-minded, intelligent, good wives." 

Just because they would rather play tennis than go 
bowling, enjoy Thai food, dress their children in 
name label clothing, are computer literate, and pre- 
fer deck parties with merlot and brie rather than 
backyard barbecues, "does that make us weird or 
something?" 

What irriates mothers of soccer players the most 



are attempts by media types and columnists to cate- 
gorize their lifestyle and political preferences. Oh? 

There's a reason why they drive utility vehicles or 
vans. Buffy, Tammy and Melodi asked in unison, 
"Ever try to get five kids, a golden retriever and a 
load of groceries in a BMW or a Honda Civic?" They 
admitted in hindsight that voting for Bill Clinton 
and Carol Moseley-Braun four years ago might not 
have been a good choice. "But at the time it 
seemed like the right thing to do. You know, Hilliary 
and the 'Year of the Woman.' That kind of stuff." 
The jury still is out on Dick Durbin. 

Buff, Tarn and Mel insisted that they're tuned in on 
the real world. "After all, we've got mortgages and 
pay taxes like everyone else." 

Soccer moms are happy with their lot in the 'burbs, 
nuturing preocious kids, married to capable, hard- 
working husbands who jog and drink beer "like real 
guys." Their biggest concerns, besides what hap- 
pens to their lives after offspring outgrow soccer 
years, are whether the Dow hangs in at 6000 and if 
sending away the kids to a four-year college will be 
doable. 

William Safire, writing in The New York Times, 
found that the soccer mom designation has found a 
place in political jargon and popular conversation 
like "hard hats," "angry white males," ,and "gender 
gap." "They tend to be hardheaded rather than 
hard-hatted," Safire noted earnestly. 

Buffy, Tammy and Melodi aren't especially put out 
for being lumped as over-protective, 30ish moms 
who spend a lot of time carpooling, fretting about 
"woman's issues," defiled for their cultural diversity 
and ridiculed about their rainbow of political opin- 
ions. For now, they're bemused at media attention. 
They have a pragmatic view of the future: 

"Soccer is only a time of our life. We'll grow out of 
it," reasoned the three moms with good humor. 
Thanks for the conversation and your views, ladies. 



Guest commentaries weIcome 

Lakeland Newspapers welcomes guest 
columns by our readers on topics of general 
Interest. Anyone Interested In writing a col- 
umn can contact Publisher W.H. Schroeder 
at (847) 223-8161. Submissions may be 
mailed c/o Lakeland Newspapers, P.O. Box 
268, Graystake It, 60030 or fax to (847) 223- 
8810. Deadline Is Friday at noon, 




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November 1 5, 1 996 UkElAwd Newspapers COUNTY' 



Party Lines — — 

Sheriff Clint Grinnell years heralded by admiring throng 

Party Lines, the Lakeland Nmusnnnar I iwimi i d „ * i .. ^ O 



, 



Party Lines, the Lakeland Newspaper 
column of political commentary, is pre- 
pared from staff reports. 

Former Sheriff Clint Grinnell 
made generous use of his handkerchief 
at a testimonial dinner honoring his 42 
years in law enforcement. He said he 
couldn't help getting a little misty-eyed 
at the outpouring of adulation. 

A large delegation of downstate sher- 
iffs and police chiefs swelled the throng 
of more than 350 persons hailing the 
soft-spoken lawman at Midland 
Country Club. Emotional moments 
punctuated the overall tone of light- 
hearted banter that goes with a fond 
farewell. 

State's Atty. Mike Waller served as 
master of cere- 
monies and did his 
best to keep the 
presentations 
moving at a fast 
pace, even to the 
extent of introduc- 
ing Mundelein 
Police Chief Ray 
"Brevity" Rose, 
who represented 
the Lake County 
Chiefs Assn. and 
the Illinois Assn. of 
Chiefs of Police. 

Waller welcomed Circuit Judge Jack 
Hoogaslan as "Reverend" Hoogasian 
for a lengthy invocation. It was that kind 
of evening. 

The MC good-naturedly chided State 
Sen. Adeline Geo-Karls and State 
Rep. Bob Churchill about losing their 
majority status after election day. 

County Republican Chairman 
John Schulien presented Grinnell and 
his wife, Marian, a crystal elephant. The 
Northern Illinois Sheriff's Assn. present- 
ed Grinnell a model tractor emblematic 
of his life-long interest in farming. 




Rose 




Schulien 



R e c e n t 1 y 
appointed Sheriff 
Gary Del Re laud- 
ed the outgoing 
sheriff for his stan- 
dards of ethics, 
character and 
leadership. On 
behalf of the Lake 
County Sheriff's 
office, Del Re pre- 
sented Grinnell 
with a special 
packaged com- 
memorative hand gun. 

The Grinnells were given a $1,000 
travel certificate by friends assembled 
for the testimonial. 

The sheriff's wife joked afterwards 
that they'll need more wall space at 
their farm home in Fremont Township 
for all her husband's plaques "maybe an 
addition." 

No one could remember any previ- 
ous public expression of praise and 
thanks for a former Lake County sheriff. 
••• 

Relaxing— A dejected Bob Neal, 
defeated for recorder of deeds and men- 
tioned immediately as a prospect for 
next month's County Board balloting for 
chairman, isn't much interested in 
another election campaign. Not now, 
anyway. 

"I'm just thinking about going to 
Florida and relaxing," stated the durable 
politician who has held a variety of elec- 
tive offices and his present appointive 
position as a commissioner of the 
Illinois Tollway Authority. 

"Maybe something will be decided by 
the time I get back," remarked Neal, 
who has two years remaining on his 
term as a County Board representative 

from the Wadsworth area. 

• •• 

Sweepstakes — Two prominent 




Sheriff Grinnell shares a few laughs with his family during his retirement party at 
Midlane Country Club in Wadsworth. Celebrating with him are: Kelly, Bill, Justin, 
Marion, Cathy, jordyn Grinnell— Photo by Linda Chapman 



County Board chairman aspirants were 
busy "working the room" at the testimo- 
nial for former Sheriff Clint Grinnell. 
Bob Grever from strong Republican 
Ela Township and David Stolman 
from swing area Buffalo Grove are 
among leading contenders in the chair- 
man sweepstakes. 

••• 
History repeats — Two long-time 
political enemies ironically bowed out 
of public life the same way. Both were 
township supervisors and powerful 
County Board members. Norm Geary, 
retired and living in Antioch, chose not 
to urn for reelection to the County 
Board after defeated as Avon Township 
supervisor. Bob Depke, defeated for 
another County Board term, called it 
quits rather than risk another defeat 
after conclusion of his current term as 



supervisor of Warren Township. 
••• 

Please relieve us— Now that Lake 
County Board Commissioner Robert 
Neal (R- Wadsworth) has lost his 
chance to serve Lake County as 
recorder, and fatten his pension, when 
will all those Neal for Recorder signs be 
removed from every nook and cranny 
of the county"? 

• •• 

An arresting thank you— The 

Mundelein Police Department often 
receives letters of thanks From citizens 
who have benefited from their assis- 
tance. One missive, however, caught 
them by surprise — a letter of thanks 
from a driver arrested for driving under 
the influence of alcohol. 

"Thanks for saving my life," he 
said. 



\ 1 



U 



• j 






1 1 






Letters 






From page C4 

to keep my husband at home when he was 
bedridden. He was happy and content 
until the end, because of their care and 
concern, and he passed away with dignity. 
Hospice people are a special, dedicated 
and caring group who have helped me 
through some rough times. 

I wanted to give something back to 
them and wanted to do something that 
counted. I now volunteer for hospice, and 
even got to meet two of my best friends 
while volunteering there. I will always be 
grateful to hospice for their care and 
suppport. They are a great organization 
and deserve all the recognition they can 
receive. 

Marie Schaack 
Barrington 

Post election reflection 

Editor: 

This is in response to a letter from 
Tammy Sakalowski. Tammy, it is truly a 
shame that you will not utilize your very 
first chance to vote. I can still remember 
the first chance I had to vote. 

Like you, I^was not fully knowledge- 
able of all the candidates running for 
office and I thought that the issues did not 
affect me. But, I "did not" choose "not" to 
vote. 

Whether you realize it or not, each 
and every issue "does" affect you. How we 
run our government today, "will" affect 
how you live tomorrow. You cited that the 
important issues facing you are having 
somewhere to go to get you off the streets 
and stay away from crime. If you would 
only look there are many things available 
for you to do. 

Go to your church or youth organiza- 
tions (or is this too uncool?). You might be 



surprised at the fun things they do. Even 
your school has clubs you can join. If these 
don't suit your fancy, use your constitu- 
tional right to organize and rally for what 
your youth needs. If it is a club with danc- 
ing and music that you want, get off your 
butt and do it. How do you think the older 
adults get the ball rolling for legislation 
they want changed or buildings they want 
built or organizations they want formed? 

Laurie Behrendt ■ 
Lake Villa 

'Playing at' being rich 

Editor: 

Ah, the lifestyles of the rich and 
famous. That seems to be the view of the 
Grayslake Village Board. Of course, it's 
easy to play rich if you have a seemingly 
unlimited source of money to tap. That 
would be ours. 

The jogging trail is probably used by 
less than one percent of our community. 
Now it is an equestrian underpass. How 
many people can afford and keep horses? 
And why do we have to pay for their privi- 
lege? In the future, there is looming on the 
horizon the pool, that few of us will use as 
evident by nearby communities and our 
many votes of "no!" 

When you continue to come up with 
projects that are*used by such a small 
minority of us yet funded by all of us, you 
are being foolish, selfish, and unworthy of 
the office you hold. We, in this country are 
in serious trouble spending more than we 
take in. There simply is not enough money 
to be made to afford all that you dream up. 

When are you going to grow up and 
accept the fact that there is a limit to that 
which you take from us to fulfill all of your 
dreams. I say it's past due. Put the breaks 
on this equestrian underpass and forget 



"all" projects that will be used by less than 
three-fourths of the people. Let's not 
bankrupt us all for the joys of the few. 

Mary Kotarba 
Grayslake 

Village 'hides' on Route 53 

Editor: 

The Corridor Planning Counsel (CPC) 
is a collection of governmental units near 
or bordering the right-of-way for the pro- 
posed Route 53 tollway extension. The vil- 
lage of Mundelein sits on this counsel. 

The reason the village offers for par- 
ticipating in counsel business is to insure 
protection of its residents should the toll- 
way come to be, plowing through its resi- 
dential neighborhoods. It was unveiled at 
the Oct. 24, meeting of the CPC the true 
. weakness of that protection. 

The CPC approved its Construction 
Standards, a document that has been 
years in the making. CPC approved these 
standards without a vote from Mundelein; 
the village did not bother to send a voting 
representative to this meeting. The stan- 
dards are too lengthy to paraphrase here; 
what is of utmost importance is the 
"Protection" these standards provide for 
residents, namely, the conflict resolution 
portion of the standards. In the event of a 
plan dispute between a governmental 
unit/village and the toll authority (ISTHA), 
the standards state the two parties (ISTHA 
and village) will meet in an attempt to 
resolve the dispute. If this meeting does 
not resolve the conflict, the two parties 
then consult with the CPC for another 
attempt at resolution. If the conflict still 
cannot be resolved through CPC involve- 
ment, then ISTHA merely has to "explain" 
its reasoning when they will not meet a 
particular standard. 



In other words, as Mundelein Village 
Administrator Ken Marabella and CPC 
Chairperson JoAnn Eckmann concede, 
ultimately the toll authority can do what it 
wants, regardless of the existence of con- 
struction standards. The village of 
Mundelein has a resolution opposing the 
centerline of the road. The village board 
needs to stop saying they want to protect 
its residents, but truly do it, by passing a 
resolution opposing the construction of 
Route 53, no matter where it goes. 

Deb Giles, Director 
Mundelein Against The Tollway 

Developers abuse wildlife 

Editor:* 

The audacity of developers in por- 
traying wildlife serenely cohabitating with 
people in new subdivisions is spurious at 
best and amounts to little more than wish- 
ful thinking and false advertisement. 

The reality of the situation is that 
these developments, rather than accom- 
modating wildlife, actually contribute to 
their decline by destroying their already 
scarce habitats. In traveling through the 
Lake and McHenry County areas one is 
confronted with the unabated destruction 
of existing woodlands, wetlands and 
prairies. 

The wildlife depicted in ads, fre- 
quently in idyllic and pastoral settings, 
have in fact been driven from their habi- 
tats, often leading to their untimely death. 
The sad fact is that the only wildlife truly 
available in these developments are the 
ones you find dead on the side of the road. 

Donna Usa 

Lea Pinshower 

Victoria Graham 

. , Lake Villa 



1 * * - __ - - * m ■ ■ I T *- J -»*^ 



^ | BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE UkelANd Newspapers NovEMbtn 1? f 1996 

Several ways to lower taxes, keep stress level down 



I pay my taxes. I pay them without joy, 
relief or satisfaction. Like most Americans, 
I understand that some taxes are neces- 
sary. I want the U.S. to have strong nation- 
al security. I want to live and work in a safe 
environment. I desire to maintain the 
quality of life for which we have worked 
hard and I want to help those who "can- 
not" help themselves. 

However, I still dislike paying taxes. 
Therefore, I work hard to ensure that I do 
not pay one red cent more than I owe. 

For small-business owners avoiding 
tax problems is an increasingly complex 
task. The legislature passes new tax laws 
and the IRS rewrites tax regulations every 
year. In addition to dealing with tax code 
changes, entrepreneurs still have to run 
their business. The combination of all 
these activities usually results in high 



stress levels and general avoidance of tax- 
ing issues. 

Unfortunately, procrastinating on tax 

issues will only 

raise your level of 

stress and often 

adds to the 

amount of taxes 

you must pay. 

However, there 

are some things 

you can do to 

lower both your 

stress level and 

your tax bill. Here's some advice from the 

tax pro's. 

Lowering taxes and stress levels 

• Keep good records. The first step is 
to keep track of all revenue and expenses. 




MiNdiNq Your 
Own BusiiviEss 



In the event of a tax audit, if you cannot 
document and prove it, it did not happen. 
Small expenses like auto mileage, business 

meals and supply 
items can add up 
to big tax savings if 
recorded carefully. 
AH businesses 
need a separate 
business checking 
account in which 
to deposit rev- 
enues and from 
which to pay bills. 
• Organize your records. The method 
of organizing your records will depend on 
the number of transactions involved in 
your business operation. Small businesses 
with a limited number of customers and 
expenses may use a manual system of 



Don TavLor 



recording the data. Other, more active 
businesses, may need computerization. 

• Use a tax professional. One of the 
best business decisions I ever made was to 
bring in a qualified pro to advise me on tax 
issues and prepare the returns. I have used 
the same accountant for several years and 
feel that I get a great return for the money 
I spend. To keep the costs as low as possi- 
ble, I dp my own record keeping and send 
my accountant a summary of financial 
activity.. ,-^ L 

• Write down potential tax- questions. 
Every year 1 start a new file for that year's 
tax information. When I think of a tax 
question, I make a note to file so I will 
remember to discuss it with my accoun- 
tant. When I get three or four questions in 
the file, I give him a call. 

See TAXES page C7 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE feS- d 



Speaker 
;o address 
business ethics 

Patrick E. Murphy, Ph.D., 
professor and chairperson of 
the department of marketing 
at the Univ. of Notre Dame, 
will speak on "American and 
European Business Ethics" at 
7:30 p.m. Nov. 21 in the audi- 
torium at CLC's Grayslake 
campus, 19351 W. 
Washington St. 

Murphy will compare 
responses to ethical issues by 
American and European com- 
panies and discuss company 
codes, philosophical state- 
ments and training programs. 
His information is based on 
long-term studies done in the 
United States and interviews 
with continental, British and 
Irish executives during his 
sabbatical as a Fulbright 
Scholar at Univ. College Cork 
in Ireland in 1993-94. 

Author of numerous arti- 
cles on business and market- 
ing ethics, Murphy is the for- 
mer editor of "Journal of 
Public Policy and Marketing" 
and is on the editorial review 
boards of "Journal of 
Marketing," "Business Ethics 
Quarterly" and "Journal of 
Macromarketing." He won the 
1992 Reinhold Niebuhr Award 
from the Univ. of Notre Dame 
for his writings in the areas of 
ethics and social justice. 

For information, call 223- 
6601, ext. 2515. 



STOCK WATCH 



I F&R Sales has been running the drifts since '69 



GLORIA DAVIS 



Change Dlv. 

+1 1/4 S0.96 



Company Price 

Abbott 52 3/8 
Allstate 57 7/8 
Ameritech55 1/4 
AT&T 38 3/8 
Baxter 43 1/4 
Brunswick 24 5/8 
Unicom 27 3/8 
D. Witter 62 7/B 
McDonalds 47 
Motorola 51 3/4 
Peoples En. 35 1/2 
Qkr.Oats 37 5/8 
Sara Lee 39 
Sears 50 3/8 
UAL 51 1/4 

Walgreens 40 
WMXTech.33 3/4 
CherryEleclOl/4 
Brwn. Ferris 26 1/2+1/4 
Many local slocks moved up as 
the stock market set records for 
six days straight. 

■ Stock Watch provided by 
Noah Seidenbcrg of Edward D. 
Jones & Co,, Grayslake. 



-2 1/8 
-3/8 
+4 1/8 
+1 1/2 
+1/0 
+1/2 
+15/8 
+1 1/2 
+5 3/8 

+1 5/8 

+11/2 

+3 

+3 3/8 

+1/8 

-5/8 



$0.85 
S2.12 
$1.32 
$1.13 
$0.50 
$1.60 
$0.88 
$0.27 
$0.40 
$1.84 
$1.14 
$0.76 
$0.92 
$0.00 
$0.44 
$0.60 
$0.00 
$0.68 



Staff Reporter 

The one-car American family of 
the 1940s became a two or more 
car family after World War II. In the 
late 1960s, as the average family Waukegan, began selling and ser 



ing on roads filled with cars and 
trucks. 

It was in 1969 that Frank's Auto 
Service, established in 1958 by 
Frank Celesnik, at 2048 N. Lewis in 



income increased and American 
families had more leisure time, a 
market for vehicles that were dedi- 
cated to having fun was created 
and soon became a fast growing 
industry. 

First came the snowmobile of 
the late 1960s and early 1970s, 
when there were several manufac- 
turers jumping on die winter recre- 
ational bandwagon. The snowmo- 
bile gave people an alternative to 
skiing for a winter sport. It was eas- 
ier, done sitting down, and satisfied 
many yearnings for speed that 
were only answered by the more 



vicing snowmobiles by becoming a 
Polaris dealer. Ron Celesnik 
worked with his dad from the time 
he was in high school, first on cars, 
then on snowmobiles. 

Taking over the business after 
his 'dad died in 1984, Ron and his 
wife, Wendy, added another fast 
growing type of recreational vehi- 
cle, ATVs, All Terrain Vehicles, to 
the Polaris line at F 8t R Sales and 
Service. These vehicles could drive 
over all sorts of terrain like the 
snowmobile when there was no 
snow. 

With recreation vehicles run- 



dangerous motorcycle up to that ning on trails and over open land 

time. Racing on a designated trail year round there was no place for 

or across an empty snow-covered the industry to go but onto water, 

field was less dangerous than rid- In 1992, Polaris came out with the 

First National Bank plans contest 



First National Bank-Employee 
Owned will be holding a poster 
contest for I^akc County area chil- 
dren during American Education 
Week Nov. 17 through 23. The con- 
test will be just one of the many 
ways Lake County celebrates "The 
Learning Connection," a week 
when parents, employers and com- 
munity members are encouraged 
to become involved in education. 

During the week of Nov. 17 
through 23, First National Bank- 
EOwill invite all children grades 
kindergarten through fifth to par- 
ticipate in a poster contest focused 
"What I Like About School and 
Learning." Participants can draw 
anything they would like centered 
around that subject. Judging will 
take place at bank locations in 
Antioch and Gurnee on the morn- 
ing of Saturday, Nov. 23. Prizes will 
be awarded. 

By taking part in "The Learning 
Connection" week in November, 
First National Bank-EO hopes to 
encourage both children and adults 
to recognize the importance of 
education. "The children of this 
community are our future, and it is 
our responsibility as business and 
community members to praise 
their efforts" said Karen Kubin, 
marketing representative for First 
National Bank, "I am very proud 
that our bank wants to be involved 
in this effort. When employers, par- 
ents, educators and community 
members work together the impact 
can be tremendous." This will be 



the fifth year Lake County Learns 
will be working with the communi- 
ty to celebrate "The Learning 
Connection," 

For more information call, First 
National Bank-EO at 838-2265. 



sit down personal water craft and F 
& R Sales and Service joined other 
dealers in selling and servicing this 
fast growing segment of the recre- 
ational vehicle industry. 

Today, F&R Sales and Service, 
dealing exclusively in Polaris vehi- 
cles offers 41 snowmobile models, 
including the Indy 500 Carb, the 
Indy Trail, the Indy XLT and the 
Indy Ultra. 

They also offer 14 ATV models 
including the Sportsmen 500 and 
the Trail Boss. There are eight 
water craft models with the 
SLT700, die SLT780 and the SL900 
leading the pack. This year Polaris 
water craft featured a two cylinder 
engine made in the USA Although 
Polaris vehicles are made in 
Minnesota, the engines were made 
in Japan until now. F&R strives to 
feature vehicles made in the 
United States. Today snowmo- 
biles, ATVs and water craft are also 
used in rescue efforts and in emer- 
gencies. 

F&R Sales and Service has the 
largest selection of Polaris clothing, 
accessories and novelties in the 
midwest, from sportswear, sweat- 
shirts, warm-up suits and long 
underwear, to thermometers, 
clocks, coffee mugs, etc., to saddle 
bags, windshield bags and much 



much more. 

According to Wendy, Polaris has 
come out with an entirely new 
design in snowmobile helmets. 
This new helmet gives a wider 
range of vision, has a non-fogging 
shield and a new style of venting, 
among other improvements. 

F&R also sells and services trail- 
ers for all Polaris vehicles made by 
Triton, Caravan and Chilton. An 
enclosed trailer by Timberwolf is 
also offered. F&R features a cus- 
tom built aluminum cap to cover 
flat snowmobile trailers to help 
keep the vehicles clean. | 

Wendy says that now that there 
a fewer and better snowmobile 
manufacturers, more people are 
buying them. "People have more 
leisure time. There are many volun- 
teers, members of state and local 
clubs that work at seeing the trails 
are in good shape and at trying to 
erase the image of the "rider and 
drinker" that many people still have 
in their minds. It is harder and 
harder to maintain the snowmobile 
trails because of all the construc- 
tion going on in Lake County." 
"Real snowmobilers think snow- 
mobiling 12 months a year. It's not 
at all unusual for me to sell a leather 
jacket in July," she adds. Call 662- 
4243 for more information. 



National landscape honors 

The Merit Award of the Associated Landscape Contractors of America was presented to Van Zelst, 
Inc., Wadsworth for its landscape design and installation at a new Highland Park residence. The 
wide mix of landscape elements includes varieties of new mature trees, perennials, annuals, low 
growing shrubs, expansion of turf, large boulders and grass paving. 





■■■Try 






% A 



IMovEMbcn 15, T996 LftkEkwd Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 






BusiNEss BmEfs 

Giving Tree program at Lakehurst 

WAUKEGAN— Lakehiirst Malland The Salvation Army have 
joinedefforts through the Giving Tree Program this holiday sea- 
sonto ensure the unfortunate children of Lake County wake up 
to a gift Christmas morning. The Giving Tree Program will offi- 
: daily begin 8 a.m. Friday, Nov. 29. This is an annual tradition at 
Lakehurst Mall and has been one of the mall's holiday priorities 
for over 14 years. The two Giving Trees will be located lower 
level, Center Court by the Information Center and inside the 
Gift Wrap Center. A total of 700 cards showing the children's 
name, age and gender will decorate. the tree. People are asked to 
choose a card and purchase a gift for the child; Lakehurst Mall 
will wrap all gifts free. Deposit the wrapped gift in the 
Collection Center located in the Gift Wrap Center, East Center 
Court. The Salvation Army will distribute all gifts by Christmas . 
Day. The Giving Tree Program runs through Saturday,- Dec. 21. 

Women in Management to meet 

WAUCONDA— ''Paths to Success" is the theme of the 
November Women in Management meeting to be held at the 
Lake County Museum Wednesday, Nov. 20. Women in 
Management, Inc., is a national support organization for pro- 
fessional women and women in management founded to facili- 
tate the exchange of experiences and ideas and to promote self- 
growth in management. The evening will begin with networking 
and museum browsing beginning at 6 p.m.Members and guest 
will enjoy one woman's path to success shown at the museum 
in the quilt collection of the Neville family, exhibiting the results 
of Jennie Neville's artistic journey, which began in the 1840s. 
Dinner, catered by Hearth Fare of Libertyville, will be at. 6:30 
p.m. Museum Director Janet L Gallimore will address the group 
at 7:15 p.m. To make a reservation, call 295-037Q. 

laCASA receives $ 20,000 grant 

GURNEB— For the third year in a row, LaCASA, the Lake 
County Council Against Sexual Assualt has received a $20,000 
grant from The Blowitz Ridgeway Foundation to support its 
ongoing children's programs, Including sexual abuse aware- 
ness, prevention and intervention services. LaCASA's Children's 
Services include individual and group counseling, medical and 
legal advocacy support, arid a personal safety program provided 
to all Lake county school children along with their parents and 
teachers. LaCASA has serviced over 20,000 people in the last 
year through their comprehensive programs. 



Sheldon Good to auction 72 properties 



Sheldon Good and Co.'s 45th 
Chicagoland Real Estate Public 
Auction, to be held on Saturday, 
Nov. 23, noon at the Sheraton 
Gateway Suites, 6501 N. Mannheim 
Rd., Rosemont, goes county-wide 
with its array of houses, condo- 
miniums, homesites and a shop- 
ping center in McHenry, Lake, 
DuPage, Cook and Kendall coun- 
ties. 



the owner's many visits to Japan. 
The 5,000 square foot home has a 
commanding Great Room with a 
heated lagoon/swimming pool, 
island, and a two story waterfall 
that doubles as a diving platform. 
Five large bedrooms contain tradi- 
tional tome mat bedding and some 
open to private gardens and soak- 
ing tubs. Surrounding this one-of- 
a-kind residence is an award-win- 



Noteworthy in the selection of ning Japanese garden with 130 



72 properties is the famed "House 
of Many Waterfalls/ 1 a 5,000 square 
foot Japanese inspired estate in 
Johnsburg. 

Many of the properties will be 
sold absolute, with no minimum 
price, and some will be sold with- 
out reserve, subject to low mini- 
mum bids. 

"This auction gives buyers an 
opportunity to consider the variety 
of outstanding properties available 
throughout the sic county metro 



species of flora, a teahouse on the 
bank of the Fox River, and nearly a 
dozen waterfalls. 

The home will be sold without 
reserve, subject to a minimum bid 
of $250,000. It is available for view- 
ing by appointment only. 

Two brand new Kennedy built 
model homes at 33765 and 33789 
Pine Creek Trail, are in Gages Lake 
in Lake County. The 2,400 and 
2,700 square foot semi-custom 
homes have four bedrooms and 



area," said Steven Good, president two baths and are the remaining 

of Sheldon Good and Co. properties in 

"Everyone wins when property 

owners select the auction method 

of selling. Owners trim much of the 

costs of keeping a property on the 

market over time, and buyers win 

by typically purchasing at prices 

less than they would have paid 

through traditional methods." 

According to Good, builders, 
developers, and individual home- 
owners are increasingly turning to 
auctions to eliminate brokerage 
fees, sales staff salaries, advertising, 
taxes, mortgages and ongoing 
maintenance. 

The properties to be auctioned 
Nov. 23 will be open for inspec- 
tions. Some highlights: "The House 
of Many Waterfalls" in Johnsburg, 
McHenry County was inspired by 



Enter the Lakeland Newspapers/ 

CiNEplEX OdeoN RidqE Cinemas Contest to win: 



5 



CiNtrux OtXON 



STAR TREK 






properties in the completed 
Kennedy Community 

Development of 54 homes. Located 
three blocks west of Hunt Club Rd., 
they' can be viewed 2 to 4:30 p.m., 
Sunday, Nov. 17. 

A brand new 4,000 square foot 
classic Georgian style home in 
Greenbriar is located at 8041 
Greenbriar Ln. Burr Ridge. The 
home contains four bedrooms, 
three baths, and a three car garage 
and includes an all brick exterior, 
gourmet kitchen, two story entry- 
way foyer, and in the master suite, a 
masonry fireplace. Originally 
priced at $795,000, the suggested 
opening bid is $275,000. Viewing 
dates are noon to 3 p.m., Saturday, 
Nov. 16 and Sunday, Nov. 17. 

In downtown Naperville, 
DuPage County, 10 luxurious con- 
dominiums are part of River Place 
Condominiums on the famed River 
Walk. These one, two, and two bed- 
room-with-den condominiums 
include living room and bedroom 
balconies and full-sized washers 
and dryers. 

The property's maintenance- 
free lifestyle features a full-time 
concierge, complimentary conti- 
nental breakfast and shuttle service 



to the nearby METRA train station, 
and 24 hour fitness center. 
Originally priced from $119,000 to 
$250,000, the suggested opening 
bid for each home is $65,000. 
Viewing dates are 12 noon to 4 
p.m., Sunday, Nov. 17. 

Fifteen wooded Lakewood 
Estate homesites are located in the 
timbered hills of Norway in Kendall 
County. The three-fourth to two 
and three-quarter acre lots are situ- 
ated near unspoiled lakes, ponds, 
and ravines and Lakewood Estates 
neighbors golf courses and shop- 
ping plazas. The Fox and Illinois 
rivers invite white water canoeing, 
and close by are hiking trails, nature 
areas, woods, and meadows for 
cross-country skiing, snowmobil- 
ing, ice skating and sleigh rides. 

The suggested opening bid for 
a homesite is $15,000, and five will 
be sold absolute, regardless of 
price. Located one-fourth mile west 
of the intersection of Route 71 and 
County Highway 3 (Sheridan Rd.), 
viewing dates for the Lakewood 
Estate homesites are noon to 2 
p.m., Nov. 17. 

A 59,000 square foot retail 
shopping center with desirable 
frontage on both Devon Ave. and 
Rohlwing Rd. is in Elk Grove Village, 
Cook County and consists of ten 
shops, including two anchor 
spaces. Situated on a five-acre site, 
the strip center is easily reached 
from Highway 1-290 and the 
Thomdale exit-just about one half 
mile from new and growing resi- 
dential developments. The shop- 
ping center has alternative uses, as 
well. 

Prospective buyers must pre- 
sent cashiers checks (in amounts 
that vary with each property) 
before bidding. For a complete auc- 
tion list, a bidder's in kit, or to make 
an inspection appointment, call 
(312)630-0915. 

Sheldon Good and Co. is the 
largest real estate auction firm in 
the country. With its headquarters 
at 333 W. Wacker Dr., Chicago, and 
offices in ten U.S. cities and 
Canada, Sheldon Good and Co. has 
sold more than S6 billion of resi- 
dential and commercial real estate. 



FIRST CONTACT contest to win: 

• Star Trek: First Contact Movie Poster 

• $25.00 Spencer's Gifts Gift Certificate 

• A Collectors Edition Star Trek Final Unity Game 

Supplied By The Maker of Civilization II, Microprose. 

• Or 2 Cineplex Odeon Movie Passes 



-New Businesses 



1) Name 4 other Star Trek Movies? 

2) What crew member was once turned into a Borg? 

3) What is a trekkie? 

Send your entry to: 
"Star Trek: First Contact" 
Cineplex Odeon's Ridge Cinemas 
960 W. Dundee Rd. 
Arlington Heights, IL 60004 



Congratulations to the following new Lake County businesses: 

• Slide Effects, 175 Old. Half Day Rd., (Spectrum Office Centre) 
Lincolnshire. Owned by Annette Loziuk of Vernon Hills. Call 680-5491. 

• Lang de Leon Publishing, 400 Larkdale Row, Wauconda. Owned by 
Norma Zachary of Wauconda. Call 526*9043. 

• Copeland Mechanical, 420 Lake Ave., Round Lake Beach. Owned by 
William Copeland of Round Lake Beach. Call 740-0709. 

• Lyle Electric Company, 27060 W. Hwy. 176, Wauconda. Owned by 
Robert Lyle of Wauconda. Call 526-5350. 

• Travel Quest Unlimited, 32715 N. Forest Dr., Grayslake. Owned by 
Marian B. Sides of Grayslake. Call 494-9048. 

• KG Medical Services, 34894 Gogol Ave., Ingleside. Owned by Debbie 
Klein of Ingleside, call 587-0833 and Rhonda Garamoni of Round Lake, call 
740-4419. 



Taxes 



Name. 



Address. 



City 



State. 



_Zip. 



Prizes will be mailed to you. Entries must be received by Dec. 13, 1996 



From page C6 

• Discuss major changes in your business operation with your tax pro- 
fessional. For example, do not change your legal structure, tax year, inven- 
tory method or open or close locations, etc., without understanding the tax 

ramifications. 

• Track and document travel and entertainment expenses carefully. 
Several years ago 1 lost a big deduction during an IRS audit. Why? I simply 
did not document the purpose of the travel involved with adequate details. 
This year, only 50 percent of business meals and entertainment 

is deductible. However, you can deduct 100 percent of your mileage, air 
fare, rental cars and hotels used for business. 

• Use available resources. Visit your local IRS office and pick up a copy 
of publication No. 334: Tax Guide for Small Business. There are also some 
good books available for additional study. For example, "Top Tax Saving 
Ideas for Today's Small Businesses," by Thomas J. Stemmy (Oasis Press), 
and "Kiplinger's Sure Ways to Cut Your Taxes," by Kevin McCormally 
(Kiplinger Books), are good guides for reducing taxes. 

Editor's note: Don Taylor is the co-author of "Up Against the Wal- 
Marts." Write to him in care of "Minding Your Own Business," P.O. Box 67, 
Amarillo t TX 79105. 










, • *r*ii>wnin L 



<J BANK & FINANCE UIceIancI Newspapers NovEMben 1 5, 1 996 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Illinois CPA Society offers scholarships 
students of accounting, entrepreneurship 



The Illinois CPA Society has announced it 
pilot Accounting Entrepreneurship 
Scholarship program, which will provide 
$2,000 scholarships to four students at both 
DePaul Univ. and the Univ. of Illinois at 
Chicago during the 1996-97 academic year. 
The eight students from the two universities 
will receive the scholarships based upon cer- 
tain eligibility criteria and a commitment to 
pursue a combined education in both 
accounting and entrepreneurship. 

The objectives of the Illinois CPA Society's 
Accounting Entrepreneurship Scholarship 
program include: raising awareness of entre- 
preneurship and entrepreneurial studies pro- 
grams at both the student and faculty level at 
targeted schools; encouraging undergraduate 
and graduate students to pursue a combina- 
tion of accounting and entrepreneurship 
studies; encouraging Illinois CPA Society 
members to pursue an MBA or graduate 
studies in Entrepreneurship; fostering inte- 
gration between accounting and entrepre- 
neurial studies departments; providing a 
model for other Illinois colleges and universi- 
ties and to encourage them to better inte- 
grate accounting and entrepreneurial studies; 
and making a more visible the total benefits 
of self-employment through business start- 
ups and business start-ups and business 
ownership in every endeavor. 

The Illinois CPA Society will appoint a 
committee of certified public accountants 
(CPAs) and entrepreneurial studies programs 
faculty to oversee the Accounting 
Entrepreneurship Scholarship program and 
review scholarship applications and select 
winners on an annual basis. 

Scholarship recipients will be chosen on 
the following criteria: 

• Achievement in school, including both 




Joe Tomasello 




John Hansen 




LAKE COUNTY'S 
MORTGAGE SPECIALISTS 

Specialists Since 1919. 
Now Celebrating Our 77th Year! 

HOMETOWN SPECIALISTS 

IN 

•Conventional Loans # IHDA Loans 
•Construction Loans ( First Time Home B «y ers ) 
•Commercial Loans •Home Start Program 



Dee Garcia 




APPLY AT OUR LENDING OFFICE 

5384 GRAND AVE, GURNEE 

OR 

CALL 249-6312 




Ray Georges 




FIRST FEDERAL BANK, » 

Wholly Owned Subsidiary, Northern State Financial Corporation RDM ^^ 
MAIN OFFICE LEWIS AVE, OFFICE GURNEE OFFICE 



Al Oiler 



Madison at County SL 1428 North Lewis 
Waukegan, IL 60085 Waukegan, IL 60085 
(847) 623-0084 (847) 249-6307 



5384 Grand Avenue 

Gumce, IL 60031 

(847)249-6312 



H0METCMWW ATTEIlIlIfii 



their general and accounting courses GPS; 

• Career goals and intentions; 

• Extracurricular activities; 

• Plans/ ability to sit for and pass the CPA 
exam or CPA certificate; 

• Interest in entrepreneurship and com- 
mitment to pursuing and completing 
Entrepreneurial Studies; 

• Illinois resident. 

As a part of the application process, the 
Accounting Entrepreneurial Scholarship 
Committee will evaluate students based 
upon their answers to two essay questions — 

1. Why is it so important for CPAs to learn 
entrepreneurial knowledge and skills? 

2. How would receiving this scholarship 
to pursue entrepreneurial studies and 
accounting fit in with you career plans? 

Criteria for evaluating the essays would 
include: content and commitment to pursu- 
ing accounting and entrepreneurship; writing 
ability; analytical skills; and career goals. 

Financial support for the Illinois CPA 
Society's Accounting Entrepreneurship 
Scholarship program will come from the John 
E. Hughes and Jeanne T. Huges Foundation. 

During the pilot year (1996-97 academic 
year), a total of $16,000 in scholarship funds 
will be presented to four students — $2,000 
per eligible student — at both DePaul Univ. 
and the Univ. of Illinois at Chicago. 

After the first year, the total scholarship 
funds will be increased to $32,000— $2,000 
scholarships for four students at both DePaul 
Univ. and the Univ. of Illinois at Chicago, as 
well as second year scholarship renewals of 
$2,000 for those recipients who qualify again 
based upon their academic standing and 
continued commitment to the combined 
study of accounting and entrepreneurship. 




from your 



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For HOMETOWN ATTENTION, It's your HOMETOWN BANK 

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(847) 244-6000 ,, . (847), 244.6000 /> .. "iggtf 




A Wholly owned aubsldlaiy of 

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Corporation. 




High CD Rates Are Here! 



For a limited time only, we're offering an amazing 6.30 Annual Percentage Yield 
on our 18 Month Certificate of Deposit in amounts of at least $1,000. We're off er- 
ing it in celebration of the ^otMB^^^^^^^SS^S 
anniversary of our Gurnee Office. [J c ^^ d 

Open any CD of $1,000 or more and receive 10 

Free Minutes of Long Distance telephone ser- 

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GURNEE 



anniversary 
We celebrate-you win. Stop in at the 
ARGO Federal office near you. But 
hurry. This very special offer ends 
November 23, 1996. 




FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK. 



6121 Washington Street • Gurnee, IL 60031 • Phone 

847-855-2100 

Other locations include Summit (main office), Bridgeview, Dolton, and 

Madison Street in Chicago. 

FDIC Insured ^ 



tow* 
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The offer ends .it the close of business on November 23, 1<J%. Tlie Annual tWcchlage Yield is based on daily com- 
pounding under Ihe assumption Hint principal and interest remain on deposit for llie full lerm. A minimum deposit of 
51 ,000 is required. We know that we've already said all (bis before, but don't you feel better now thai you've read it 
again in Ihe fine prmlr . 



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lOuiLiOJtad 

LENDER 



JNovEMbERl5, 1 996 UkEUivd Newspapers BANK & FINANCE 





& Finance 




Lakeland 



Newspapers 



How to evaluate your wealth, retirement needs 



More Americans than ever before are • 
now participating in the investment mar- 
kets — stocks and bonds. 

This is in large part due to the prolifer- 
ation ofc4plK and similar types of retire- 
ment plans, which are invested most often 
in stock and bond mutual funds or insur- 
ance carrier provided investment vehicles. 

There has also been significant growth 
in individual investments in mutual funds, 
variable annuities and individual stocks by 
both IRA plans and those making personal 
investments. 

These trends are encouraging because 
so many have participated in the excellent 
performance of the investment markets in 
recent years. Except for some minor set- 
backs in 1991 and 1994, the primary trend 
in investment markets has been annual 
growth increases in double digit percent- 
ages. 

There is no doubt that participating in 
the investment markets will produce better 
return than traditional savings vehicles — 
passbook accounts, money markets and 
certificates of deposit. 

This new participation in investments 
markets carries some responsibilities to 



This WAy to WeaItIh 



ensure favorable results. These responsibil- 
ities include taking a more active-role in 
understanding some concepts that are 
new to many: risk management, asset allo- 
cation, diversification and portfolio analy- 
sis. 

We all 
must 
develop 

invest- 

ments ALAN NADOLNA 

outside 

of retirement plans and social security if 
we are to enjoy a satisfying retirement. 
Every study in the last 20 years has shown 
that we must save on a personal level to 
supplement existing programs. 

Social security and formal retirement 
.plans will provide between 50 to 70 per- 
cent of what is needed for adequate retire- 
ment. 

We all must begin to manage and mea- 
sure our holdings. Start with personal bal- 
ance sheets and net worth statements. 
These will indicate where we stand now. 

Then create an asset allocation state- 
ment — divide your assets into categories: 
domestic stocks, international stocks, 



bonds, saving vehicles, real estate and oth- 
ers. This will demonstrate how diversified 
your investments are. 

An additional analysis is related to risk: 
understanding that each investment car- 
ries risk, what types of risks there are and 

how 

much you 
can com- 
fortably 
maintain 



Illinois CPA Society offers accounting courses 

The Illinois CPA Society will offer continuing professional education course that 
will address the latest accounting and auditing issues and changes. 

"Audits of Multi-Family and Single Family Mortgages and Loan correspondent 
Participating" will be held at DePaul Univ., Chicago on Nov. 20 Fee is $220 ICPAS mem- 
bers/ $260 non-members — eight CPE credits. 

"Fraud Audition" will be held at the Holiday Inn-North Shore, Chicago, Nov. 26. Fee 
is $185 ICPAS rnembers/$225 non-members— eight CPE credits. 

For further schedule information, call (312)993-0393 or 1(800)993-0393. 



North Shore Trust and Savings 
Proudly serving our community for 75 years! 
■ loin in the celebration— open a 



Diamond 



wersary CD 




♦ *75 % bonUS TOte over current 6 month CD rate 

To earn the .75» bonus rate, a new or existing tnterest-caming NOW checking account is required. 

To Celebrate Our 75 th Anniversary 

♦ All new or existing North Shore NOW checking accounts will earn 

♦75 % ° ver our current rate f° r 75 days. 

♦ New NOW accounts receive 75 FREE checks and a 
FREE Cash Station® ATM Card. 

Hurry in to take advantage of our 
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Because unlike a diamond, 

which lasts forever, 

these great rates 

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TRUST AND SAVINGS 



700 S. Lewis Avenue.* 
WaLiki-uaw.lL 60085 
847.336-4430 

1233 N. Green Bay Road 

Waukeuan.lL 60085 

847-625-3100 

L-niC Insured 



•Annual Percentage Y«cld (APY) In effect as of November 12, 1996, Ralo Is subject to change without nollco. This Is a 
llSSCeCa. accounts only and may bo withdrawn a. any ^"^^^££3 
nccounl II 51,000 balance Is malnlalnod In any other deposit account. There Is a penalty for carry withdrawal. 



Investment markets will eventually go 
through down periods. 

These will be particularly destructive 
to those who understand^that markets go 
through ups and downs, but the overall 
trend is up. The better we learn to under- 



stand and manage our investments the 
better results we achieve. 

Our office has produced simple proce- 
dure guides for taking charge of evaluat- 
ing, managing and planning investments. 
For copies write to Associates in Financial 
Planning, 633 Skokie Blvd., Suite 308A, 
Northbrook, IL 60062. 

Editor's note: Alan Nadolna, is a consul 
tant to financial service organizations and 
is a financial advisor to corporations and 
individuals. He is a member of a panel of 
financial experts preparing This Way To 
Wealth, 

For further information, call- 1(800)428 
9786. 



••• 



"bKSk In Jolly Old St. Nick 

by joining the 



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m 



McHenry 
State Bank 
Christmas Club 

for 1997. 



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W$m$3 Make next year jollier with plentyj 

of money for your holiday fun. 
jgtfjL Start saving now with a 
**>r Club Plan of your choice.... 
See Us Today! 



\ x 







Serving McHenry Since 1906 

McHenry State Bank 

385-1040 






1 CLASSIFIED UkElAivd Newspapers NovEMbER 15, 1996 



OBITUAR 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



FuneraI directory 

JUSTEN'S ROUND LAKE 
FUNERAL HOME 

222 N. Rosedale Ct., Round Lake 

(847) 546-3300 

Jeffrey Jordan, Manager/ Director 

Mark Justen, Owner/Director 

GEORGE R. JUSTEN & SON FUNERAL HOME 

3519 W. Elm St., McHenry IL 

(815) 385-2400 
Mark Justen, Owner/Director 

JUSTEN'S WONDER LAKE 
FUNERAL HOME 

7611 Hancock Dr., Wonder Lake 

(815) 728-0233 

Mark Justen, Owner/Director 

RINGA FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL, LTD. 
AND CREMATORIUM 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang and 

Richard A Gaddis, Director 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

Dan Dugenske, Director 

(847) 395-4000 



Griefnotes\ 

You can help in a number of special ways. 
Through reaching out and offering support in 
the form of listening and presence you will help 
a great deal. Ask your friend how they are doing. 
Mention the deceased by name and allow the 
bereaved to continue discussion about the 
deceased if they wish. Many bereaved report 
feeling isolated. You can help by including them 
in your social groups. Contact with the grieving 

How can I help someone 
who is grieving? 

is the most important during the period right 
after the death and in the three or four months 
following when the bereaved feel especially iso- 
lated. Reach out and make your presence felt. 



%% Hamsfier 

JuneraCtfome Ltd. 



*wa 



12 N. Pistakee Lake Road, Fox Lake, Illinois 

(V Itk Cfiapef on the Lafe" 

Serving ybu Anytime ... Anywhere 

Phone:. (847) 587-2100 • (815) 385-1001 



rDEATh NOTJCES 



PUISOLAHTI 

Osmo Puistolahd, age GO, of Gurnce 

Ait: Marsh Funeral Home of Gumee, Gurnee 

QUINTO 

Leticia Quinto 

Ait: Kristan Funeral Home PC, Mundelcin 

MAHNKE 

Lorraine Mahnke, age 00, of Ubertyville 
Am Wilton Mortuary, Peoria 

DUNCAN 

Armeter "Tina" Duncan, age 49 or Gurnee 

An: Mash Funeral Home of Waukegan, Waukegan 

GREEN 

Albert "Dud" Green Jr., v age 74 of Ubertyville 
Am Burnett Dane Funeral Home, Libertyvillc 

LAMB 

Helga Lamb, age 83 of Round Lake Park 

Am Justen's Round Lake Funeral Home, Round 

Lake 

GREENE 

Ottaway Greene Sr., age 75 of Mundelcin 
Arr: Kristan Funeral Home PC, Mundclein 



Arthur Dalziel 

Age 04, of Antioch passed away Nov. 6, 199G at Victory 
Memorial Hospital, Waukegan. He was bom January 16, 
1912, the son John and EllaMac (Sales) Dalziel. He was a 
member of St. Ignatius Episcopal Church of Antioch. He 
was employed as an electrician for General Electric and a 
member of the Electrical Union. 

He is survived by his wire, Marge; two grandchildren 
Jacqueline Martin and Nanetta Phillips and 3 great grand- 
children, Nicole, Jenifer and Suzanne. Me was preceded in 
death by his parents, a daughter EttaMac Grimes, one sister 
UnaTronson and a brother Roland Dalziel. 

Services were held at St. Ignatius Episcopal Church, 
Antioch widi Fr. Vincent Eckholm officiating. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Home, 
Antioch, 

Interment was private. 

Donations may be made to the Church in his memory. 

Evelyn Robinson (nee Reiser) 

Age 90, a former resident of Fox Lake, passed away 
November 10, 1996atVictory Lakes Continuing Care Center 
in Lindcnhurst. She was born March 21, 1906 to John and 
Add (nee Kuby) Reiser. She had been employed by Olin Ind., 
Stanford, Conn, and was a member of the Crystal Lake 
Church of Christ. 

Survivors include, 2 sisters Margaret (Earl) Warner and 
Virginia 0"Rcilly; plus many nieces and nephews. She was 
preceded in death by her parents, her husband John; 2 
brothers John and Edward Reiser and 3 sisters, Grace Davis, 
Florence Skrinc, and Lillian Jones. Also preceded in death 
by two nieces Janis Davis and Patricia Skrine. 

Services were held with Rev. Raymond Exum horn the 
Cryustal Lake Church of Christ , officiating. 

Arrangements were made by K. K. Hamshcr Funeral 
Home, Fox Lake (The Chapel on the Lake. 
Interment was private. 

Memorials may be sent to Crystal Lake Church of 
Christ, 401 N. Oak St. Crystal Lake, IL 60014; or the Pioneer 
Center, 4001 W. Dayton, McHenry, IL 60050 in her memory. 

Elizabeth Bauer (nee Hertel) 

Age 08, of Inglcside, passed away November 9, 1996 at 
Winchester House, Ubertyville. She was bom July 3, 190B. 
She was a farmer and was a member of St. Joseph Catholic 
Church, Round Lake. 



HOB 



Strang funeral 'CHapeC, Ltd. 
& Crematorium tstiBs&ms 



She is survived by 2 sons William Bauer and James 
(Joan) Bauer; her daughter Janet (Tony) Raysby; 2 brothers 
Bernard Hertel and Raymond (Rita) Hertel; 2 sisters Anna 
Ettten and Matilda Dietz, 12 grandchildren; 21 great grand- 
children. She was preceded in death by her husband Edwin 
Bauer; her daughter Mary Bauer, and a son Richard Bauer; 
3 sisters Mary Spoerlein, Rose Kattner and Rena Leffelman; 
and 3 brothers John, Anton and Joseph Hertel. 

Services were held at St. Joseph Catholic Chunfh. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Grayslake. 

Interment was at St. Bede Cemetery, Inglcside. 

Samuel Hovorka 

Age 15 days of age, of Antioch, passed away November 
9, 1996 at Rockford Memorial Hospital, Rockford. He was 
born October 25, 1996, the son of Stephen and Allison 
Hovorka. 

Survivors include his parents Stephen and Allison; two 
brothers Nicholas and Anthony; one sister Alexis; Maternal 
grandmother LaVerne Kaleta; paternal grand parents 
Cristinc Smidi and Henry Hovorka. Paternal great grand- 
mother Loretta Hovorka; and many aunts, uncles and 
cousins. 

Services were held with Sister Kathleen Hurley of Holy 
Name Church, Wilmot, Wisconsin officiating. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Home, 
Antioch. 

Interment was at Holy Name Cemetery, Wilmot, 
Wisconsin 

Donations may be made to a family memorial in his 
memory. 

Florence Fairmau 

Age 85, of Uke Villa, passed away November 8, 1996 at 
Victory Memorial Hospital in Waukegan. She was born 
August 17,. 1911 die daughter of David and Johanna (Shine) 
O'Kccre. She was a member of Prince of Peace Church, Lake 
Villa. She was employed at Midwest Molding in Gumee. 

Survivors include: two daughters Joan (Ed) Sorenson 
and Colleen (Al) Fuller; grandsons Craig (Michelle) Fuller 
and James (Raeann) Fuller; great grandchildren Alison, 
Carrie and Courtney Fuller and nieces Cathlcen (Clarence) 
Leetzow and Patricia (Bernard) Bradach. She was preceded 
in deaUi by her husband William "Ear!" Fairman ; a sister 
Mary Leonard; two brothers Timothy and Francis O'Kecfe 
and a great grandaughter Laurie Ann Fuller. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Home, 
Antioch. 

Interment was nt Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. 

Masses may be said or donations may be made to die 
Lake Villa Fire Dept. or Rescue Squad in her memory. 

Joseph Plichta 

Age 81, of Antioch, passed away November 8, 1996 at 
Victory Memorial Hospital, Waukegan. He was born 
November 10, 1914, the son ofjoseph and Barbara Plichta. 
He was employed by Union Special Mfg. of Chicago and 
also served in the US Army during WWII. 

Survivors include his sister Anna (Madiias) Wlntergerst; 
a nephew Kenneth (Joane) and two great nieces, Cadiy and 
Marianne. He was preceded in deadi by his parents and a 
nephew Russell. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch 

Interment was at St. Joseph Cemetery, River Grove. 

Donna Mac Hoff 

Age 62, of Lake Villa, passed away on November 6, 1996 
at Condell Medical Center, Ubertyville. She was bom on 
February 7, 1934. She and her husband owned and operat- 
ed HolT's Columbia Bay Restaurant in Lake VillA. She had 
also owned I loff's Kitchen in Grayslake. She was a Lioness 
with die Grayslake Lions Club and been involved widi the. 
Brownies and Girl Scout organizadons. also was a member 
of My Favorite Fan Precious Moments Club. 

Survivors include her husband, Robert; and children, 
Laura (Samuel) Woodford and Charles (Angela) Hoff; grand- 
children AmandaLee Woodford and Linnea , Brandon , 
Nadian and Trevor Hoff; her mother 
Alma Emerick; a brodicr Brenton (Virginia) Emerick and a 
sister Beverly (Harold) Schmidt. She was preceded In deadt 
by her fadier Ora Lee "Jack" Emerick and a sister Kadicrine 
Thompson. 

Services were held with Rev. Vincent Eckholm officiat- 
ing. Arrangements were made by Ringa Funeral Home, 
Lake Villa Interment was at Avon Centre Cemetery, Lake 
Villa . 
See OBITUARIES page C7 




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LEGAL NOTICES 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ORDINANCE OFTHE BOARD OFTRUSTEES ' 

OF VERNON TOWNSHIP, LAKE COUNTY, 

ILLINOIS, ESTABLISHING A FEE 

SCHEDULE FOR USE OF COMMUTER RAIL 

STATION PARKING FACILITY DETERMINING 

RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR ITS USE 

AND SETTING PENALTIES FOR 

, VIOLATION OF SAME 

WHEREAB^Sjactlon 85-10 of the Illinois Township Act grants 
lo (he TOWNSHIP," acting through its Board of Trustees, authority 
to acquire real property by purchase; and 

WHEREAS, Section 85-13 of the Illinois Township Act grants 
to said Board of Trustees the authority to expend funds directly for 
ordinary and necessary maintenance and operating expenses for 
public transportation including transit systems; and 

WHEREAS, the TOWNSHIP, acting through its Board of 
Trustees, has acquired certain land within the TOWNSHIP for the 
purpose of constructing and operating a commuter rail station and 
parking facility; and 

WHEREAS, Section 85-10 of the Illinois Township Act 
declares that every Township has the corporate capacity to exer- 
cise the powers granted to it or necessarily Implied by the Act; and 

WHEREAS, the TOWNSHIP has previously entered into a 
Commuter Station Development Agreement, with amendments, 
which requires the TOWNSHIP to set fees for the use of the pro- 
ject's parking facilities adequate to defray the TOWNSHIP'S oper- 
ating, maintenance, debt service, lease fees, capital cost recov- 
ery, capital reserves and administrative expenses for the opera- 
tion of the project's parking facility; and 

WHEREAS, said Commuter Station Development Agreement 
(Amendment No. 2) requires that all parking fees collected shall 
first be utilized -for routine maintenance and administration 
expenses Incurred from the operation of the parking facility, 
Including lease payments; the remainder shall be deposited In a 
capital improvement account to be used for future rehabilitation or 
expansion of the parking facility; and 

WHEREAS, Section 30-190 of the Illinois Township Act allows 
the TOWNSHIP to make all by-laws, rules and regulations 
deemed necessary to carry Into effect the powers granted to it 
and may Impose fines deemed proper; and 

WHEREAS, the Board of Trustees of VERNON TOWNSHIP 
deem It to be conducivo to and in tho best Interests of its Inhabi- 
tants to set fees and restrictions for the use o( the aforesaid com- 
muter rail station parking facility and lo Impose fines for the viola- 
lion ol such restrictions. 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the Board of 
Trustees of VERNON TOWNSHIP as follows: 

SECTION 1. There Is hereby established a daily foe for park- 
ing In tho TOWNSHIP'S commuter rail station parking facility 
located at or near the Intersection of Route 22 and Main Slrcel in 
the aforesaid TOWNSHIP under the following terms and condi- 
tions: 

A. "Dally Fee" means the amount required to be paid, as set 
forth from time-to-time by ordinance, for the purpose of parking 
within the TOWNSHIP'S commuter train station parking facility 
that will be deposited into the appropriate fee collection system 
established by the TOWNSHIP. The payment of the fee only per- 
mits parking for the date of such payment. 

B. Said "Dally Fee* as set at the rate of $1 .50 per day and shall 
be applicable from 6:00 a.m. lo 8:00 p.m. each day. 

C.TheTOWNSHIP may designate certain spaces as overnight 
parking spaces. Operators of vehicles parked In such overnight 
parking spaces shall notify the TOWNSHIP office prior to leaving 
the vehicle In said space and advise the TOWNSHIP that the vehi- 
cle will remain In the parking facility overnight and the length of 
time the vehicle will remain In the parking facility. The operator will 
provide a vehicle description, license plate registration number, 



Obituaries 



From page C6 

MaryAiih Koll (nee Kecgan) 

Age 65, of Spring Grove, passed away November 6, 1996 
atVencor Hospital, Chicago. She was born April 17, 1931 to 
John and Anne (nee Schmitt) Keegan. She was a member of 
the Antioch Businesswomen's Assn. and a member of the 
Antioch Country Club. 

Survivors include: her husband, John Kohl; 3 daughters 
Karen Kohl, Sandra (John) Thompson Jr., Sheila (William) 
Holland; 5 grandchildren: Krystle Kohl, Jessica and John 
Thompson III and Mathew and Ann Holland; 2 brothers 
Michael (Loretla) Keegan, Raymond (Kim) Keegan and a 
sisterTem (James) Stefelc She was preceded in death by her 
parents and a brother Edward Kecgan. 

Arrangements were made by K. K. Hamsher Funeral 
Home (The Chapel on the Lake), Fox Lake. 

Interment was private. 

Edna Luby (nee Curran) 

Age 93, of Round Lake, passed away November 12, 1996 
at the Victory Lakes Continuing Care Center in Undenhurst. 

She Is survived by a son Donald (Martha) Luby and 
many grand children. She is preceded in death by her hus- 
band, Clarence. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium Ltd., Grayslake. 

Interment was at St. Joseph Cemetery, Round Lake. 

Memorials may be given to the St. Joseph Church in 
Round Lake in her memory. 

Gary Shearer Sr. 

Age 49, of Crivitz, Wisconsin, formerly of Round Lake 
Beach; passed away November 6, 1996. He was born 
October 17, 1947. He graduated from Grayslake High School 
and served in the U.S. Navy. 

He Is survived by his wife, Deborah; sons, Gary (Julie) 
Shearer, Douglas, David and Darrell Shearer; 4 grandchil- 
dren; his modier Arlene (Arthur) Shearer and his father Neil 
Shearer; and a brother Ronald (Diane) Shearer. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake 

Interment was at Avon Centre Cemetery, Grayslake 

Jane Scandura (Nee Alexander) 

Age 63, of Round Lake Beach, passed away November 



name of registered owner, address and telephone number and 
shall pay to the TOWNSHIP, In advance, the applicable daily fee 
times the number of days the vehicle will remain In the said space. 

D. The TOWNSHIP may designate certain spaces as handi- 
capped parking spaces to which the aforesaid fees shall apply. 

E. No parking shall be allowed in the said commuter rail sta- 
tion parking facility except In designated parking spaces. 

G. When the TOWNSHIP shall cause lines or marks lo be 
placed on any parking area designating individual parking spaces, 
no person, firm or corporation shall park or place a motor vehicle 
in such parking area so as to encroach upon an adjacent space. 

H. It shall be and is hereby declared to be the duty of any per- 
son, firm or corporation who shall park or permit the parking of 
any motor vehicle in Ihe commuter rail station parking facility to 
lock and secure the said motor vehicle for the prevention of theft 
of thB vehicle or its contents, and the TOWNSHIP shall not be 
liable In the maintenance or such parking facility to any motor 
vehicle or contents of any motor vehicle placed In said parking 
facility, nor for the Injury to person or property arising from the use 
and maintenance of said parking facility. 

I. When signs are erected giving notice thereof, no person who 
Is not a handicapped person shall stop, sland or park a vehicle in 
a parking space designated as reserved for handicapped per- 
sons. 

J. It shall be unlawful to cause any vehicle to be backed Into 
any parking space within the aforesaid parking facility. 

K. It shall be unlawful to park In a manner so as lo obstruct the 
normal movement of traffic within the parking facility. 

L. It shall be unlawful to park a truck of more than two (2) axle 
design, a trailer, or a bus of any kind within the parking facility. 

M. The TOWNSHIP may allow for monthly permit parking and 
shall issue monthly parking permits which permits shall be promi- 
nently displayed on the vehicle's rear view mirror upon the pay- 
ment, in advance, of Ihe full monthly fee. At the time of issuance 
of a monthly parking permit, the operator of said vehicle shall fur- 
nish to the TOWNSHIP a description of the vehicle, license plate 
registration number, and name, address and telephone number of 
the registered owner. Monthly parking permits shall not be trans- 
ferable. 

SECTION 2. ENFORCEMENT AND PENALTY 

A. Citations 

1 .Whenever a police officer notes a violation of any of the pre- 
scribed rules or regulations hereby established, said peace officer 
may, In lieu of the Tiling of a Complaint In Court, Issue to such 
alleged violator a citation: 

(a) Advising such person that there has been a violation ol this 
Ordinance; 

(b) Requesting such person to make payment In an amount 
applicable to said alleged violation as set forth herein as settle- 
ment of said violation claim; 

(c) Informing said person that upon failure to so settle, a com- 
plaint will be Tied In Circuit Court charging said person with such 
violation. 

2. Pursuant to said Citation, the person so accused of said vio- 
lation may settle the violation claim by paying to the TOWNSHIP 
the applicable amount as set forth herein within a period to be 
specified In said Citation. 

3. Such payment shall be made In accordance with the Instruc- 
tions contained In Ihe Citation. 

4. In the event that Ihe person to whom said Citation Is Issued 
fails to settle said violation claim within the prescribed lime, or 
within a period of time specified in a final notice (if one is served 
upon him) then the TOWNSHIP is authorized to cause a notice to 
appear to be served upon said alleged violator and is authorized 
to file a complaint and lo prosecute the same In Circuit Court. 

5. The fact that a motor vehicle which is illegally parked is reg- 
istered with the Secretary of Stale In the name of the alleged vio- 
lator, shall be considered prima facie proof that the said alleged 



6, 1996 at Condell Medical Center in Libertyville. She was 
born October 24, 1933. 

Survivord include, her 2 daughters Stacia (Adam) 
Allison and Gina (Michael) Miosi; a son Michael Wlshne; 4 
grandchildren: Lesley, Robyn, Scott, Michael and Megan 
Miosi; 5 sisters and 2 brothers; plus numerous nieces and 
nephews. She is preceded in deadi by her son Vincent 
Scandura Jr.;and a broUier Elbert Alexander. 

Services were held with Rev. Richard Rubietta of the 
United Protestant Church of Grayslake, officiadng. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake. 

Memorials may be given to the condell Hospice, 115 
Church St., Libertyville, 1L 60018 in her memory. 

Juanita Bernauer (nee Schomer) 

Survivors include her husband Norbert; four children: 
Linda (Doren), Maribcth (Michael), Michael (Leona) and 
Sharon (Billy); grandchildren: Jacqueline, Samuel, Daniel, 
Amelia, Andrew and John; Mother Gertrude; brothers 
Donald (Margie) and Gerald (Pat); sister Marilyn (Nick); 
brother-in-law Howard (Jean); sister-in-law Rosemary (Al) 
and many nieces and nephews. 

A memorial Mass was held at St. Gilberts Church, 
Grayslake 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium Ltd., Grayslake 

Donations to the Regional Organ Bank of Illinois, 800 S. 
Wells, Suite 190, Chicago, IL 60607, Attn: Lorraine Wilmont 
is appreciated in her memory. 

Christopher Kraft 

Age 26, of Grayslake, passed away on November 7, 1996 
at Lutheran General Hospital, Park Ridge. He was bom 
September 21, 1970 and was employed at Motorola Corp., 
Libertyville. He attended Grayslake High School and College 
of Like County, Grayslake. 

Survivors Include: his mother, Barbara Ladner; his 
broUier David (Louise) Kraft; his fiancee, Angela Conner; 
nieces and nephews Jennifer, Joseph and Jessica Kraft. He 
was preceded in death by his father, Albert II and his broth- 
ers, Albert III and William. 

Arrangements were made by Rlnga Funeral Home, 

LakeVilla 

Interment was at Ascension Cemetery, Libertyville. 



violator was In control of or was the operator of the motor vehicle 
at the time of such alleged violation. 

B. PENALTIES 

The violation claim described In said Citation may be settled In 
the amount set forth In the following schedule: 

1. In the event that such payment is made prior to the mailing 
by the TOWNSHIP of a delinquent notice, the following amounts 
shall be accepted as a settlement: 

(a) Parking where prohibited/improper parkIng-S20.00; 

(b) Overtime Parklng-S20.00; 

(c) Illegal parking in handicapped area-$1 00.00; 

(d) Failure to pay daily parking fee-$20.00. 

2. In the event that payment has not been paid prior lo the 
mailing of delinquent notice, and In fact, delinquent notice has 
been mailed, the following amounts shall be accepted as settle- 
ment: 

(a) Parking where prohibited/improper park!ng-$25.00; 

(b) Overtime Park!ng-S25.00; 

(c) Illegal parking In handicapped area-51 25.00; 

(d) Failure to pay dally parking Fee-$25.00. 

3. In the event that payment Is not made within the time pre- 
scribed In the delinquent notice, and a notice to appear has been 
served and a complaint filed In the Circuit Court, the following 
amounts shall be accepted as settlement up to the actual Court 
date; 

(a) Parking where prohibited/improper parking-$35.00; 

(b) Overtime parking-$35.00; 

(c) Illegal parking in handicapped area-51 50.00; 

(d) Failure to pay daily parking fee-S35.00. 

4. TOWING 

(a) In addition to the penalties prescribed above, the TOWN- 
SHIP may cause to be lowed, without notice, any motor vehicle 
determined to be in violation of the rules and regulations set forth 
herein. 

(b) Any motor vehicle parked in violation of the rules and reg- 
ulations set forth herein is declared to be in obstruction and a pub- 
lic nuisance. 

(c) Any such motor vehicle towed under the provisions hereof 
shall be Impounded at facilities designated by the TOWNSHIP 
until fully claimed or disposed of pursuant to stale law, Chapter 
625 of the Illinois Compiled Statutes. 

SECTION 3. DISPOSITION OF FEES AND FINE REVENUE 

In accordance with the Commuter Station Development 
Agreement (Amendment No. 2) all funds received by way of park- 
ing tees and tines Imposed for violations of this Ordinance shall be 
placed In a segregated account tor the payment of routine main- 
tenance, administration expenses, and debt servicing Incurred 
Irom the operation ol tho parking facility with the balance ot such 
funds, it any, being deposited in a capital Improvement account to 
be used for future rehabilitation or expenses of the said parking 
facility. 

SECTION 4. DEFINITIONS 

Any term contained herein shall have lhai meaning ascribed to 
it In the Illinois Vehicle Code, Chapter 625 of ihe Illinois Compiled 
Statutes. 

SEC TION 5 . SEVERABILITY 

If any provision of this Ordinance, or the application of any pro- 
vision of this Ordinance is held unconstitutional or otherwise 
Invalid, such occurrence shall not affect the other provisions of 
this Ordinance, or their application, that can be given effect with- 
out such unconstitutional or Invalid provision affecting its applica- 
tion. Each unconstitutional or provision, or application of such pro- 
vision is severable. 

SECTION 6. PUBLICATION 

The TOWN CLERK is hereby authorized and directed to post 
and publish this Ordinance as Is required by the Illinois Township 
Act. 

SECTION 7. EFFECTIVE DATE 

This Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after 
its passage and approval. 

AYES: 4 

NAYS: 

ABSENT: 

APPROVAL DATE: November 9, 1996 

PUBLISHED DATE: November 15, 1996 

APPROVED: /s/ William E. Peterson 
TOWNSHIP SUPERVISOR 

ATTEST: 

/s/Barbara Barrtataee 
TOWN CLERK 

1196C-410-VH 
November 15, 1996 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 
The Grayslake Community Park District, Grayslake, Illinois 
hereinafter referred to as the PARK DISTRICT requests sealed, 
single, lump-sum proposals for: 

RENOVATION WORK-OLD POLICE DEPARTMENT BUILD- 
ING JONES ISLAND PARK OFFICE. 
according to Ihe contract documents as prepared. 
Contract documents may be examined on or after November 
8, 1996 at the Grayslake Community Park District, 243 Harvey, 
Grayslake, Illinois during normal office hours which are: Monday 
through Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m.; Saturday 9:00 a.m. -noon. 

Contract documents may be obtained at the office of the PARK 
DISTRICT. Proposals must be received by the PARK DISTRICT In 
accordance with the following: 

BY HAND or MAIL DELIVERY 

Grayslake Community Park District 

243 Harvey 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

Time: Bids must be received no later than 

3:00 p.m. LOCAL TIME, Docember 13, 1996. 

Proposals will be publicly opened and read aloud commencing 

at 3:01 p.m. LOCAL TIME, December 13, 1996, Action on said 

proposals will be taken by the PARK DISTRICT on this date or a 

later dale. PARK DISTRICT reserves the right to reject any and all 

bids. 

All proposals received after the hereinafter stipulated time and 
date will be rejected and/or not be accepted and will be returned 
to the Bidder unopened. 

John W.Wilson, Executive Director 

Grayslake Community Park District 

1196C-413-GEN 

November 15, 1996 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
Fox Lake Grade School 
District 114 Is requesting 
sealed proposals from quali- 
fied providers to propose 
energy conservation mea- 
sures through a guaranteed 
energy and operational sav- 
ings contract on a perfor- 
mance contracting basis as 
defined by the State of Illinois, 
87th General Assembly, In 
Senate Bill 1526 (Public Act 
87-1106). 

Proposals shall be received 
In the office of Stephen A. 
Shuda, Superintendent of 
Schools, 17 North Forest 
Avenue, Fox Lake, Illinois 
60020-1409, no later than 
9:00 AM, November 25, 1996. 
Direct questions and inquiries 
regarding proposals to Mr. 
Stephen A Shuda. 

Published in the Fox Lake 

Press on November 15, 1996, 

1196C-407-GEN 

November 15, 1996 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Antioch Self Storage 

284 Main Street 

Antioch, IL 60002 

847-395-4980 

Request a notice of Lien Sale 

be published on the following 

listed units. 

Unit No. 39- Robert Sobolek, 
New Berlin, Wl 53146. 
Contents: Household & Misc. 
Items. 
Unit No. 72-Robert Morris, 
Kenosha, Wl 53140. Contents: 
Household & Misc. Hems. 
Unit No. 105-Edward Tulten, 
Lake Villa, tl_ 60046 . Contents: 
Household & Misc. Items, 

Unit No, 157-Erlc Bocks. 
Wilmot, Wl 53192. Contents: 
Household & Misc. Items. 
Unit No. 174-Debra Spahn, 
Taeoma, WA 98408. Contents: 
Household & Misc. items. 
Unit No. 200-Sandra Mclsaac, 
Antioch, IL 60002. Contents: 
Household & Misc. I terns. 
Unit No. 38-Randy Mureson, 
Silver Lake, Wl 53170. 
Contents: Household & Misc. 
Items, 

Lien Sale will be held 
November 22, 1996 at Antioch 
Self Storage. 

1196C-414-AR 
November 15, 1996 
November 22, 1996 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Public Notice Is hereby 
given that the Board of 
Education. Woodland School 
District #50 will be accepting 
sealed proposals to install an 
Integrated Voice, Data and 
Video Technology package at 
the District's New Middle 
School. Proposal specifica- 
tions may be obtained on 
request from the Business 
Office, 17370 W. Gages Lake 
Road, IL 60030, upon receipt 
of a refundable deposit of 
$100.00 per set requested, A 
shipping and handling fee of 
$25.00 will be charged to 
those bidders who request 
mailing of bid documents. 
Bidders will be expected to 
attend a mandatory pre-bld 
conference on 1 1/22/96. Bids 
are due back to the Business 
Office on 12/5/96 at 2:00 PM, 
District #50 contact person 
regarding bids Is Robert 
Leonard, Assistant 

Superintendent of Business 
Services, (847) 855-7822.Tha 
Board of Education of District 
50 reserves the right lo reject 
any and all proposals or to 
accept the proposal which 
best serves Ihe interest of the 
district. 

Board of Education 

Woodland School District 50 

Gages Lake, IL 60030 

1196C-406-GEN 

November 15, 1996 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
Grass Lake Schoo! District 38 
is accepting bids for the 
1996/97 season. 
Please contact: 
Mr. James Beverldge 
Grass Lake School 
26177 W. Grass Lake Road 
Antioch, IL 60002. 
(847) 395-1550. 

1196C-402-GEN 
November 15, 1996 



1 

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BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE UkeUNcl Newspapers Novi-inbER 15, -1 996 , _ 








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Market Guidi 



Antiques .' 301 

Appliances 304 

Barter/Trade <■• 308 

Bazaars/Crafts 310 

Building Materials 314 

Buslness/omcc Equipment - 318 

Electronics/Computers 320 

Farm Guide 324 

Firewood 328 

Garage/Rummage Sales... 330 

Good Things to EaL 334 

Horses &Tack 338 

Household Goods/Furrd aire... .-...,340 

jewelry 344 

Lawn/Garden 348 

Miscellaneous » 350 

Medical Equip/Supplies 354 

Musical Instruments • 358 

Pels & Supplies 360 

Reslau rant Equipment 364 

Tools & Machinery „ ~ 368 

WantcdToBuy. 370 



RiiAl Estate 



Homes For Sale 500 

Homes For Rcnt..„ 504 

Homes Wanted 508 



510 
514 
518 
520 
524 



Homes Builders 
Condo/Town Homes 

Mobile Homes 

AparthiwiW Vor Rent 

Apartments Wanted — — •- '**} 

Apl/tlomcs To Share « 5£» 

Rooms For Rent ... 530 

Buildings.... 533 

Business Property For Sale „„.. 534 

Business Property For Rent , 538 

Investment Property. „ .-. „ 540 

Mortgage Services .....,' 544 

Farms „ , , 54g 

Vacant Lois/Acreage 560 

Rcsoris/VacaUoo Rentals ., 564 

Out of Area Property „ 568 

Cemetery Lois .„, „ ;. 570 

Real Estate Wanted. „ 574 • 

Real Estates Misc. 578 



RecreationaI 



Recreational Vehicles , .„.!,.,...,.,704 

Snowmobile/ATV's.,.. 708 

Boals/Motors/Elc 710 

Camping „ 714 

TraveLVacallon 718 

Sports Equipment , „.... , 720 

Airplanes. 724 

TRANSpOR^ 

Cars For Saic 804 

Rental/Leases 808 

Classic/Antique Cars ; 810 

Service & Parts 814 

Car Loans/Insurance 818 

Vans 824 

Four Wheel Drive/Jeeps 828 

Trucks/Trailers \ 834 

Heavy Equipment 838 

Motorcycles 844 

Wanted To Buy. 848 

Service DiRECTORy 

Appliances Repair »■■»■• * .......S03 

Blacktop S06" 

Builders S09 

Carpentry. S12 

Carpel Cleaning S15 

ConcreuVCcment............ S18 

Dry Wall -SI 

EducatlorVInslrocUon » S24 

Electrical S27 

Firewood S30 

Handyman......... • S3 3 

Heating/Air Conditioning S36 

Housekeeping , .....S39 

Landscaping ,,.„.. S42 

Laundry/aeanlng";.:..;^ S45 

Legal Services IL. S48 

Medical Services S51 

Moving/Storage ••■•• S54 

Painting/Decorating S57 

ParaLegal/TypIng Services SbO 

Plumbing ■ S63 

Pools S66 

Pressure Washing S69 

Professional Services S72 

Radio/TV Repair. S75 

Remodeling. S78 

Resumes • S81 

Roofing/Siding S84 

Storage • S87 

Tax Service S90 

Trees/Plants S93 

Wedding ,; 396 

Miscellaneous Services i • ®9 



.>■ t c t Pf 



NovEMbt* 1 5, 1 996 UkEkNd_NEygp A pERs. CLASSIFIEQ ■ 




.>*<.« 



disTRibuTioN 



Twin 
Lakes- 



•Silver Lake 



Kenouliu 
County 

•Bristol 



Richmond 



•Sprtofl 
Grow 



Jorntburg 



•Amioch 



(§" 



•fjxLaJK 



•Uk» •Untahurti 
VBa 

-Bflund Grtyitaka 



TV 
Lake Cod 



McHWff 



Crystal 
Lake 

Itlcllciiry 
County 



isaa ss 



^ 



•North 



•Wauconda 



Bamngton .uk» Zurich 



Barrington 



© 

•KBdaar 

•Long 
Gran 



•Palatine 



Buffalo Grave 



Metra 
-=Milwaukee 
RR 




HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD 



*53* BY 
£ifc PHONE 



-iturxfcltta N«_ Oaka 
..Vamoo UbinilWt 



HUla 

•Lincoln ihir* 



BY 

MAIL 

IN 
PERSON 



r-»l BY FAX 




Call (847) 223-8161 

Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake 

(847)223-8810 



< link ('(IHIItV 



Lakeland Newspapers Classifieds Appear in 1 J Newspapers! 

Antiodi News-Reporter • Round lake News • Lake Zurich Enterprise 

• lake \ffla Record • Mundelem News • Wadsworth News • 

Grayslake Ernes • Fox lake Press • Gurnee Press • Iindenhurst 

News • \ernon Hills News • Wauconda leader • Ubertyvifle News 



DEADLINES 

Direct Line Tues. 5 pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party ..Wed. 10 am 



HOURS 

8 am - 8 pm Mon -"JJl J ur . S 

8 am - 6 pm 



L 



,-Thurs 
.Friday I 



CLASSIFIED 



no 


Notices 



110 


Notices 



115 



Lost & Found 



AREA CONTACT PERSON 

needed for highly repuled in- 
ternational high school stud- 
ent exchange program. Call 
Julie at 1.800-888-9040 for In- 
formation. ^^__^_^ 

ATTENTION BUSINESS 

OWNERS) For Just pennies a 
day advertise to MILLIONS on 
tho Internet. FREE INFO, 
WebWorks, P.O. Box 7041, 
Dept. 111A, Chicago, II. 
60610. 



HOME BASED BUSINESS 

Jewel/Teas General Stores 

and J/T Network. Great 

potential money earnings. 

More Information call Vito 

(847) 989-9B99. 

SURROGATE 

MOTHERS WANTED 

Fee plus expenses for 

carrying a couple's child. 

Must be 18-35 and 

previously had a child. 

Steven Utz, Attorney 

(3171996-2000. 



DIET MAGIC 
Lose up to.30lbs, 
30 day programs. 

Start at $30. 
(815) 675-9237 
leave message. 



FREE CHRISTMAS PRES- 
ENTS. I'll show you how. Dial 
Toll-free 1-888-643-7411 ext. 
444. 

PAGERS UNDER $55 

Includes INC. 
Two months air time. 

(847) 973-9454 
NS117. 

GOOD VOICES NEEDED 

For Tell The World" 

Interdenominational Choir. 

Ages 15-35. 

No pay, but lots of 

satisfaction. 

Churches book now for 1997. 

(847) 526-8306. 



BUYERS AND SELLERS 
- come together every week 

In Lakeland Classified. 

(847)223-8161 



I DESTINATION 20201 



A REGIONAL 






p TRANSPORTATION PLAN g 

pThe purpose of this series of public meetings Ism 
pko Inform, explain and discuss with the public|p 
pwhat has taken place In the Destination 2020p 
|l planning process and how they can participated 
pduring this phase. Three agenda items: 

p» The Northeastern Illinois Planning Commission 
p(NIPC) will present their forecast scenarios of popu- 
Iplation, households and employment 

p«The Chicago Area Transportation Study (CATS) wil 
p present the proposals selected for inclusion in 
w, detailed transportation networks 

p* The status of transportation planning for northeast-p 
pern Illinois will be displayed and discussed 

p Date/Times {all November dates) 
p 1 6/9-noon Oakton Community College, DesPlaines |f 
Ml 8/5-8p.m. Wauconda High School, Wauconda 
H 1 9/1 1 :30-1 p.m. 300 W Adams, Chicago 
||l9/4-7p.m. Prairie State College, Chicago Heights m 
i/5-8p.m. College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn 

Ford City Mall, Chicago p 

300 W. Adams, Chicago 

All meetings axe accessible. 

For additional information on 
presentation times and meeting locations 



120 


Free ~ 



/ 




call CATS Communication 
Division: 

(312) 793-3460 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For more information, 
please contact the Humane 
Society. 

FREE PICK-UP SERVICE. 
I will haul away your unwanted 
row boat, canoe, outboard 
motors, or fishing gear FREE. 
Call (847) 566-2819 after 
5:30pm. 

FREEH GREAT FOR A 
SCHOOL. GREAT FOR STUD- 
ENTS AND SPECIAL PRO- 
JECTS. 4 YEARS NATIONAL 
GEOGRAPHIC AND SMITH- 
SONIAN MAGAZINES. (847) 
526-8992. 

KOMBUCHA MUSHROOM 
BABY. (647) 623-1295. 

ONE USED FARM GATE, 
approximately 4'6'x10'. Used 
field fencing, approximately 4' 
high. Musi take all. (847) 
526-6221. 

REFRIGERAT0R/FREE2- 
ER, GAS OVEN range, (847) 
265-0125. 

ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad In the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run at NO 
CHARGEI (We discourage 
any pel ads). Deadlines: 10am 
Wednesdays. (847) 

223-8161, ext.140. 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



120 


Free 



125 



Personals 



A SIAMESE MALE CAT 
'NICKY" missing since 11/7. 
Countryside Manor, 137 & St. 
•Mary's Road, Ubertyvllle. RE-. 
WARDI (B47) 362-5080. 

FOUND 10/29 VICINITY 
OF OAK TERRACE AND 
BURNETT, In Island Lake, 
young female Orange Tiger 
Cat, wearing flea collar. Very 
affectionate. (B47) 526-5865. 

FOUND GERMAN 

SHEPHERD DOG, Fox Lake 
area, 11/3. (847)587-2051. 

FOUND YOUNG DOG short 
hair, shepherd mix, male, light 
tan, black face, 11/12, Gary, 
off Three Oaks Rd. 

LOST TOY POODLE black 
& silver, name "Splcey", 
10/28/96, In heat, Rt. 12 & 
Barrington Rd. Reward. (219) 
83B-3642, 

LOST WHITE & BLACK 
MALE CAT, with black Charlie 
Chaplin mustache, vicinity In- 
glesiude, (B47) 546-4815. 

DID YOU FIND Someones 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept., and get your 
results, FOUND ads ore 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(847)223-8161. 



COMPLETE SET OF COL- 
LIERS ENCYCLOPEDIA 
with 10 year books, 1969 edi- 
tion. (B47) 546-3972 evenings 
or weekends. 



125 



Personals 



A BRAVE OPTION: ADOP- 
TION We're eager lo share 
our warm and loving marriage 
and bright, sunny home with a 
baby. Your dream to give your 
baby a bright future filled with 
love, opportunity, good times, 
and an adoring family Is possi- 
ble. We will be happy to help 
you in any way possi- 
ble... Please call Marsha and 
Joel at 1-800-484-6138 code 
2081. 

A NURTURING, LOVING, 

happy and secure home 

awaits for your baby. 

Legal and medical 

expenses paid. 

Kris and Susan 

1-800-809-3525. 

Attorney Glenna 

1-800-241-5384. 

ADOPTION 

A LOVING OPTION 

We're a lawyer and actress 

who became best friends and 

married. We're now eager to 

become Ihe doting dad and 

playful mom we've always 

dreamed of being. We can 

provide love, patience, humor, 

music, education and a place 

for your love and courage 

always in our hearts. Medical, 

legal, counseling and court 

approved living expenses 

paid. Information confidential. 

Please call our attorney at 

(708) 957-6817. 

CHILDLESS COUPLE 
WANTS TO ADOPT A 
BABY. Imagine your baby in 
the loving arms of a close fami- 
ly; Imagine endless summer 
days filled with friends, bike 
rides, chocolate chip cookies 
and hugs; Imagine your grown 
child a college graduate; Imag- 
ine your child becoming the 
person you want them to bo. 
it's a wonderful life we can 
offer your baby. Medical, le- 
gal, counseling, court ap- 
proved living expenses paid, 
confidential. Call our Attorney 
at (708) 957-6630. 

LOOK GOOD FOR THE 

HOLIDAYSI 

LOSE THOSE EXTRA 

POUNDS NOW) 

30 day S3 $■ back guarantee. 

100% Natural. 

Dr. Recommended. 

FREE SAMPLES. 

Call Melody (847) 548-4191. 

WANTED 23 SERIOUS 
Peoplel We'll pay you to lose 
up to 301) in the next 30 days!! 
Call 1-800-725-0916. This is a 
limited time offer. 



I I I T * 



Help Wanted: 
Foster Parents 

| Complete training, support 
I and reimbursement provid- 
ed including daycare assis- 
tance. If you like young 
people and enjoy being a 
parent, call for more infor- 
mation! Catholic Charities 
IFoslcr Care-Ask for Caroline | 
or Rosa (847) 249-3500 



fgg-aggBeafeay ^ 



ADOPTION 

Be sure and choose 
the right family for 
your chUd...one that 
is concerned about 
whatyou are going 

through. Get to 

know several couples 

with pictures at 

www.cradle.oig 

or call 

1-800-272-3534, 



140 



Financial 



SSCASHSS IMMEDIATE 

$$ for structured settlements 
deferred insurance claims. 1- 
800-386-3682 J.G. Went- 
worth. 

LUMP SUM CASH NOW? 
We buy your INSURANCE 
SETTLEMENT, ANNUITY OR 
LOTTERY WINNINGS. Pay- 
ments for CASHI Quick clos- 
ings. 1 -800-338-581 5. 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



"AVON", NO DOOR-TO- 
DOOR REQUIRED. No Mini- 
mum Orders or Inventory, 
IND/SALES/REP, 800-236- 
0041. 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

STUDENT WANTED for 

part-time work, assisting In 
home program for autistic 4yr. 
old. Flexible hours, free train- 
ing. In College Trail In Grays- 
lake. Call Eric or Suzanne for 
more information. (847) 
548-8745. 

HOUSEKEEPER, full 

housekeeping duties, 

Monday-Friday, 9am- 

1pm, S7/hr. cash. Refer- 
ences required. (847) 5B7- 
4455 leave message. 




I 



B^B^BHI 






ClASSIFIEDiUkElANd Newspapers! NovYmder 15,1996"''' 















r 



CUSTOMER 
SERVICE 

Now Hiring for 
[■• Seasonal Positions 



Monday thru Friday, days. A few positions will 
be filled immediately and several will be filled by 
the end of November. Customer Service Reps 
take in-bound sales orders and assist corporate 
customers. Requires related experience; basic 
math ability; light data entry and office skills. A 
professional phone demeanor with excellent 
communication skills is essential. Some over- 
time will be required. 

We offer seasonal employment with competi- 
tive pay & benefits, including health and ESOP 
participation. Convenient location close to 194 
and 176. Apply at THE POPCORN FACTORY, 
Mon.-Fri., 9:30 to 3, at 13970 W. Laurel Drive, 
Lake Forest, IL 60045 or FAX to 847-247-3340. 
Ph. 847-362-0028. EOE 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



EZS 



219 



HeJp Wanted 
Part-Time 



PART TIME COOK 

Cook needed to prepare meals for 
Developmental^ Disabled adults in residential 
facility west of Gumee. 
20-25 Hours a week 

For more In/ormatlon call 
Peggy LaruJck 

(8471 855-9450 ^0 



jmmrarainffiii»ra»raramra«t»miarai«L 

Part-Time, Flexible 
| SALES ASSISTANT 

gTPC Training Systems, a Buffalo Grove. IL-bascd com-Jj 
gpany is seeking parl-timc Sales Assistants for data^ 
p entry, literature fulfillment, and telephone work.i^ 
a Competitive wages, flexible scheduling. Ideal for momslfe 

Call for more information: 

| 847-808-4000 ext. 4050 § 

^MissMMiMiiMiMiiMMr»iMiMiMimPMiraMmiMr 



a 

B 

a 



i. 



a bt 



a 
a 
a 



LET'S 
TALK! 




a 

a 
a 

a 
a 

a 



3 Do you like to earn money, but nota 
§work long hours? Do you enjoyS 
^talking on the phone? Then give§ 
gmeacall. Excellent sales oppor-fj 
gtunities are available ing 
g Lakeland's Classified Sales Dept.g 
aTelemarketing experience pre-a 
aferred but not required. 

Send resume or request 
for application to: 

Attn: M. Combs 



a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 



Kohf 
Job F*a±r 

INovember 18th. - 12pm to 8pm j 

On the spot Interviews 

els Baggers <$> Cashiers 

e» Department Associates 

• Flexible Work Schedule* 

700 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

Vernon Hills, IL 
(847) 680-3130 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



xxzxzzzzzxxxzzzzzzz 

TWarrwtt $ 
I Toad Serwc&l 

Part time f 

| Monday-Friday f 

1(847) 940-7824* 
zzzzzzzzzzzzzzxxzzz 



SECRETARY / 
j ASSISTANT POSITION! 

Iwrth Investment firm in 

[Vernon Hills. Good peo- 

Iple skills, typing, clerical! 

land knowledge of MS| 

[office required. 

Call Nancy 

(847) 918-3774 

1 HOUSEKEEPING j 

I Saturday & 

I Sunday. 

I 8am-2pm at 

Retirement 

Center for 

Sisters. 

For Interview Call: 

SR. Marilyn 
Hayden 

(847) 438-5470 

Queen of 
Sleaze 



Fox Lake medical office needs a personable, energetic person" 

who enjoys dealing with patients and has excellent telephone* 

skills. Knowledge of Insurance billing, computer entry and" 

medical office experience would be a plus. Approximately 24- 5 

5 30 hours per week. Please submit a resume or brief summary | 

Sol your qualifications to our corporate office. 

Attention: Receptionist 

Northern Lake Medical, Ltd. 

103 South Greenleaf, Suite J 

Gumee, IL 60081 I 

■aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaB 



HELP 

i Animal clinic needs ren- 



table 



student after • 
J t school and some| 
•J Saturdays for general* 
',' cleaning and Kennel ■ 
' i work 



Apply In person J 

J only at: i 

Wauconda ', 

Animal Clinic | 

197 Thomas Court i 
Wauconda, IL 60084 J 



B 

a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 



WEEKEND 
RECEPTIONIST 




%J, 



We are seeking an 
individual with good 

communication skills. 

Must present a 
professional Image, 
Apply in person to: 

North Shore Terrace 
222West14thSt. 

Waukegan, IL 60085 

847-249-2400 

EOE 



g Lakeland Newspapers g 

g P.O. Box 268 g 

g Grayslake, IL 60030 a 

g orFax | 

g (847) 223-8810 j 

■aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaB 



Busy Wauconda office 

looking for permanent, 

part-time 

General Office Help, 

Hours are: 

M-F 9am-!pm 

Call to set up Interview 

with Cheryl ati 

(847) 5261411 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



Dog Groomer 

Experienced 

Part-Time 

Sundance Kennels 

(414) 857-2545 



General 
Kitchen Help 

Late afternoons, early 
evenings, some weekends, 

Apply in person at: 

YMCA 

Camp Duncan 

32405 N.Hwy. 12 

Ingfeside, IL 60041 



r 
k. 



,* Social Services-PT 

j CASEWORKER \ 

^needed to assist in the> 
^Gurnee home of ado-£ 
llescent female with[ 
iautlarn. Various after-j> 
<noon/evening/week-r 
lend shifts available.;; 
^Substitutes also need-£ 
4ed. Experience pre-^ 
Jferred, will train. 
i Call (630) 355-6533 I 
j ext 616 i 

a for more information. £ 
i EOE. I 



ANTIOCH 

GRADE SCHOOL 

DIST. 34 

Now hiring Bus 

Drivers. 

Starting Ray $10.20/hr. 

Part-time 

position -work the 

school 

calendar year. Will 

Train. Must be 21 or 

older, clean driving 

record for the past 3 

years. 

Please call 

7am-4pm 

847-395-0494 



iSeaoistressj 

; Vernon Hills mail order i 
distributor has Full & 
Part time positions 
using Automated 
equipment to sew cus- 
tomer names/logo's an 
garments. No experi- 
ence necessary. 
$a/HR to start. 

CallJo 
(847) 291-7755 




BANQUET SERVERS 

Weekends, Part lime. 
Starting at $8/hr. No expe- 
rience necessary. Will 
train. Call (847) 438-0025 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full Tune 



220 



ATTENTION OPERA- 
TORS 100% OWNER OP- 
ERATOR FLEET. GET HOME 
MOST WEEKENDS. START 
.79tf, .80S AFTER 6 MO. 
LOADED & EMPTY. CON- 
TACT: JENELL TRIPP, 800- 
362-6128 INTERSTATE EX- 
PRESS, INC. 

DRIVER $1,000 SIGN-ON 
BONUS. Slarting $.26/8.27. 
Lateral entry pay to $.28/3.29. 
Paid banefits/bonuses/more. 
Need: 1 year OTR experience 
- age 23, CX/Roberson needs 
OTR drivers for dry vans/flat- 
beds for PFT Roberson, Call 1- 
800-473-5581, EOE/mf. 

DRIVER OWNER/OPERA- 
TORS FLEET OPERATORS 
REGIONAL SHORTHAUL 
CARRIER NEEDS 12 MORE 
TRUCKS TO HANDLE LOTS 
OF "NO TOUCH' FREIGHT. 
WE OFFER: *ALL MILES PAID 
*ALL PERMITS PAID !N£ 
COMPANY THUCKS 'MILE- 
AGE GUARANTEES 34Q 
HOLDBACK OR ESCROW 
'HOME WEEKENDS GUAR- 
ANTEED CALL LARRY 
TODAY AT 800-200-CUBE 
MON-FRI, 8AM-5PM. GET 
THE DETAILSIII Hl-CUBE EX- 
PRESS. INC. 

DRIVER-EARN MORE 
WITH Celadon's new pay 
package. Over 80% drop-n- 
hook freight, 1994 or newer 
assigned conventional, 
weekly pay and plenty of 
miles, 800-729-9770. 

DRIVER-NO MONEY 
DOWN, no credit check lease 
option plus limited-time in- 
centive with $1,000 for solos, 
$2,000 for teams, $500 for 
2nd seat drivers. Prime. Free 
training available. 800-224- 
4585. 

DRIVERS - ALL air-ride con- 
ventional. Top pay. Great 
benefits. 401 K. Excellent 
miles. Must be 25, lyr. OTR, 
good MVR. Day mark. 1-800- 
240-7344 Ext. CG-3. 

DRIVERS - ARCTIC EX- 
PRESS, a Reefer Carrier run- 
ning 48 and Canada is In 
search of: Lease Purchase/No 
$ Down. Owner Opera- 
tors/Company Drivers. Call 
NOW! {800) 927-0431. EOE. 

DRIVERS OTR - One year + 
experience^ up to 30C per 
mile, weekly pay, Insurance 
furnished, 401 K, Assigned 
tractors. Call Pat, Landair 
Transport, Inc., 1-800-593- 
8111. 

DRIVERS RUN MIDWEST 

slates. Excellent pay. No un- 
loading. Home every 10-14 
days. Newer oquipment. Ex- 
cellent benefits. Student pro- 
gram. Satellite communica- 
tions. Bonus programs. Call 
Bob 000-600-5805. 

DRIVERS-AMERICAN 
CENTRAL TRANSPORT Is 

now hiring from this area. 
Slarting pay ,27 to .30 por 
mlto/bonofil3. All conventional 
Heel, 95% no touch - 50% drop 
& hook dry fralght. HOME 
MOST WEEKENDSII 25 yrc. 
aid, OTR oxporlonco, clonn 
MVR, CDUHAZ. Call Don 1- 
900050-5002. 

DRIVERS-AUTOMOBILE 
TRANSPORTATION COM- 
PANY cooks qualified OTR 

drlvors with 1 yoar oxpoflonco 
or complotod corllllod truck 
driving school. Excollont calory 
and bonolils. Application:; will 
bo occoplod Monday-Friday, 
9am-4pm. E, and L. Transport 
Company LLC, 13511 Saulh 
Torronco Avonuo, Chicago, II- 
llnola, E.O.E, 

DRIVERS-CALARK INTER- 
NATIONAL OFFERS 
GREAT PAY, BENEFITS and 
the chance to GET HOME 
MORE OFTENI Must bo 22 
with CDL and HnzMat on- 
dorsomont. 000-422-5275. 

DRIVERS-OTR ADS IS 

looking for local drivers Homo 
nightly. Flatbed and 2 years 
OTR oxporlonco roqulrod. Call 
Pam at 800-926-7862. 

DRIVERS...EXPERI- 
ENCED & INEXPERI- 
ENCED Drivers, Toam Drlv- 
ors & Owner-Oporatoro Need- 
ed I Training Avallabtol Excel- 
lent Pay and Bonofils, rldor 
programs, job stability, Swilt 
Transportation: 1-000-204- 
8785 (eoo-m/f). 

DRIVERS/OTR - TUITION 
free OTR driver training. No 
experience necessary. Up to 
S540/weok. Classes slarting 
every Monday. Must be 21. 
CRST, Inc. 1-800-504-2778. 
ht1p7www.crst.com. EOE/mf. 



IF YOUR HEART IS IN 
THUCKING, CALL US, Cov- 
enant Transport, average 
1850 miles, Coast to Coast 

runs. Weekend Recruiters 
available. Experienced Driv- 
ers: 1-800-441-4394. Gradu- 
ate Stude nts: 1-S0O-338-642B. 

LICENSED I I FF & HEA LTH 
AfipNT NEEiJv-D. Quality 
products, high commissions 
with advance before issue, 
lead system, and benefits. 
(Must qualify for advances & 
benefits). Call 1-800-252- 
2581. 

LOOKING FOR OVER the 
road drivers. Competitive 
wages and benefits. Call 1- 
800-951-4080 



Hdp Wanted I 
Foil-Time | 

"MAKE MONEY FOR THE 

HOLIDAYS. 

DISCOVERY TOYS 

HAS THE ANSWERI1 

*Home based business 

•Flexible hours 

♦Great Income 

*Be your own boss 

PLUS: Outstanding Toys For 

Your Entire Family 1 1 

NOW TRAINING 

Call (847) 356-2064 

leave message. 



INTERNATIONAL 
COMPANY 

seeks PT/FT people. Up to 
$700 per wk. Work at home. 
Set your own hours. No 
experience -necessary. Full 
training. Free Info packet. 
(414) 430-1553 



SPORTS MINDED INDI- 
VIDUAL Interested In In- 
surance sales. Leads pro- 
gram, company training, com- 
missions paid dally, manage- 
ment positions,, .available. 
Phone Capitol American, Mr. 
Wh eeler 1-800-542-8860. 

TRAINEES NEED TO fill 
openings. Learn a skill In 
'WELDING 'MECHANICS 
•ELECTRONICS 'MACHINE 
SHOP Paid training and job 
placement. Paid relocation. 
Recent H.S. grads call 1-800- 
469-6269. 



# SHEET METAL W©RKER * 

EXPERIENCED MECHANIC IN RESIDENTIAL & 

COMMERCIAL INSTALLATION & FABrUOUION. 

IMMEDIATE POSITION AVAIL. ^CELLENT 

WAGES & BENEFITS. CALL FOR APPT. 

NORTHERN AIR SYSTEMS, INC. 
847-223-8877 



SNOWIIittW & KOKCAT $ 
i IIWKEItS/OPEItATOIES 






Needed for snowplowing. 

Northshore area. 

Top Pay! Work today-pay tomorrow. 

Lots of hours. 

(847) 272-1747 






Customer Service 



The 

BIG NEWS 

is that we plan to 

a®uiln>ie otulf sales 



within 




years 



The really big, news is that 
we re hiring. 

Talk about groat opportunity. Al Quill we're 
already one ol Iho worlds loading direct 
marketers of business to business prod- 
ucts. Now we're aiming lo double our sales. 
It's all happening in Hie next 5 years. Plus 
as wo enter our busy soason wo are adding 
additional stall lo grow with us. 

So, obviously, you know what your next 
move should be, 

Wo aro now seeking individuals who have 
exceptional customer service skills and a 
cornmilment to quality and professional 
development. We currently have both full & 
part-limo schedules 



)5 available. 



Our Parl-time hours, perfect for students 
and back-to-school parents, are: 

Monday - Friday 3pm to 9pm Me 
Monday - Friday 5pm to 9pm 

(Saturday Is also an option) 

Full-lime hours ore: 

Monday • Friday 9:30am to 6pm 

We offer on excellent compensation and 
benefits package and complete training lo 
help you achieve your career goals. 
Please forward all Inquiries, with salary 
requirements, to: Quill Corporation, 100 
Scheiter Rd„ Dept, CR, Lincolnshire, IL 
60069. Or fax to: (847) 63<t-5020, No 
phone calls please, Equal Oppty 
Employer M/F/DA/. 




Where Polonllol Moots Opportunity. 



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Noyjnwbro. 1 E ,n1 flfrftoMelANd j NewSpApere a CLASSIFIED J % 



12Q 



Help Wanted 
M-Tlrae 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fall-Time 



PRICERFOR 
WOMENS CLOTHING 

J 5 Days M-F. $8.00 per hour to 

J start- Earn $7.00 after 30 days 

|by meeting store quotas. Apply 

at Community Thrift Store, 

3440 W. Grand, Gumcc. 

No calls. 



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SB 



unham's .Waukegan 
ocations haVs several 
opportunities available: 

tales Associates & 
. Cashiers 
: ult-Tlme & Part-Time) 

/e offer competitive 
yages and benefits 
deluding a merchandise 
jlscount, health and life 
isurance and 401 (k). 
product knowledge/retalt 
lerience is preferred. 

ididates can apply in 
arson at: Dunham's, 
akehurst Mall, 124 

kehurst Rd„ Waukegan, 



• ILLINOIS CENTER FOR • 



CORRECTIVE EVE SURGEOT 



. Robot I_ Kpttein, M.D, 

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST 

FT position (or a very busy 
Dr.'s of lice. Must be a self- 
starter with good communi- 
cation skills, energetic and 
career orientated. Some 
Saturdays. Great benefits. 

(815) 363-2020 or 

(815) 363-5040 FAX # 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Tlme 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



^ MACHINIST § 

kSet up and operate^ 
{Mazak H-15 with} 
^Fanuc 6M control.! 
J Experience only^ 
J need apply. 1st shift J 



^available. 



s 



J Apply in person: 
8 I & L Machining 5 

3140 Central Ave. 
Waukegan, 1L 



I 
I 

I 




The word is out about our 

OPPORTUNITIES. 



At Speedway, America's 3rd tnrgest convenience store chain, we offer 

• good pay • merit increases • weekly paychecks • flexible schedules 

• medical/life insurance • paid vacation/sick time • advancement 

opportunities • a friendly environment • and much more. Our growth is 

creating excellent opportunities for energetic, scrvicc-mindcd individuals. 



CASHIERS 

ASS'T MANAGERS 

Full & Part Time 



Beat the crowd and apply in person today at: 

SPEEDWAY 

505 Town Line Rd. 

Mudelcin, IL 

Equal Oj/jimtunity F.mplojrr 





is developing a proposal for instructor & curriculum development services 
to support the Service Schooi Command and Recruit Training Command 
at the Naval Training Center (NTC) Great Lakes, Illinois. Specific resume 
requirements as follows: 

Technical Instructor: HS diploma or equivalent, graduate of Navy 
Instructor Training (IT) Course (A-012-0011), two years full time instructor 
experience, and six years performing in an equivalent or directly related 
specialty. (2 and 6 year requirements may run concurrently). Starting 
salary will be $20.10 per hour or $41,968.80 annually. 

Technical Instructor Supervisor: HS diploma or equivalent of Navy 
Instructor Training (IT) Course (A-012-0011), ten years combined instruc- 
tor and supervisor experience, and five years supervisory experience in an 
equivalent specialty, (5 and 10 year requirements may run concurrently) 
Starting salary will be $21.10 per hour or $44,056.80 annually. 

Additionally, you will be entitled to 10 paid holidays, 10 paid vacation days, 
paid school shut-down days, 401k Retirement Plan, Medical/Dental/Life 
Flex Plan, Short/Long Term Disability, Stock Purchase Plan, Tuition 
Reimbursement, and the Family and Medical Leave Act. 
The salary and benefits are Service Contract Act mandates. 
Send or fax resume to: 

CACI Field Services, Inc. 

1 081 1 9th Street, Suite 200 

Virginia Beach, VA 23451 

Attn: Pam Tompkins 

Fax (757) 491-6684 



| ELECTRICAL ASSEMBLERI 
Connect, test & trou- 

bleshoot using wiring dia- 
grams & schematics. 
Refrigeration experience 
helpful Days, Lake Zurich 

area. S12/HF). 
ACCENT • (847) 726-8367 



220 



Dclp Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-TJnie 



DISPLAY 

ADVERTISING 

SALES 

Do you like 
meeting new 

people? 
Do. you like 

solving 

problems? 

Do you give 

good customer 

service? 



If this is you, we 

would like to hear 

from you. 

Unleash your i 

earning potential j > 

with this growth : : 

driven publisher. ! '> 

Call 

847-223-8161:: 

ext. 113 : : 

or fax your resume to - > 
Esther Hebbard ; ; 

1847-223-8810;; 

todayl 
! Group Health Benefits, 1 ! 
401 K& morel 



muoinRinonnniBDiHiiiinBBiiiiina>iiniDniii 

SALES 

Second Career Opportunities 

for Irtose returning to the lob martel or 
considering a career change. A world- 
wide leader In financial services. 
Flexible hours. Paid, 13-week Initial 
training -program. Qualified candl- 
dales can earn as much as 
SeOO/week, Initial compensation. 
Free! no obligation Career Seminar 
available scon. Call Gerry Bye at (347) 
662-2540 tor meeting to discuss 
opportunities and qualifications. EOE 
biufliiiDmuuiiiiiiuuiflniunmaaingiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiil 



Rigby's Restaurant 

NOW HIRING!! 

Full/Part'TIme 

WAITRESSES 

Apply In Person 

Ask for Pete 

M-Sat. 9-4 pm 

1910 E. Grand Ave 

Llndenhurst 



1 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuUTime 



Restaurant 

JOIN OUR TEAMI 
FT & FT COUNTER SALES 

AUNTIE ANNE'S (serving deSdous. 
fresh-baked, hand-toted pretoats) 
is opening Its newest store in 
HAWTHORNE CENTER. We oBer 
great starting pay, excelent train- 
ing, flodbie hours and a fun place to 
work. No experience necessary; 
opportunity for advancement! Call 
Debbie at (312) 336-0220, ext 
1223 for more Information OR to 
arrange for an interview. EOE 




m 



Holiday Helpers 



TT 



Cewtces Pt 1 ? 



j-j. 



MERCHANDISE 



*1 1,1,1 



1.1,1 



. Generous employee discounts 
. No experience required 
. Paid training to ensure job success 
. Day. evening, and weekend shifts 
. Perlecl tor students, homemakers. 
teachers, retirees, or anyone 
looking lor extra holiday cash * 

Wi! need smiling laces to help provide last. • 
Infjiirtly customer service.ut our stores 
Ask iitiy associate nfioui uaH-limc . — r" 
sensorial Rinplovnicnl or call / ^ 

voiit local Set vice Merchandise ; v 
store today Some weekend 
nvailnnililv required. 



• ARLINGTON HEIGHTS 
• WAUKEGAN 



DEERFIELD 



V E 




DIRECTOR OF NURSING 

Jefferson City Medial Croup, in 

independent 50 physician muitl-spe- 
dalty group, seeks i highly BOtktted, 
creauvz mgr u> loin our mgra't learn as 
ihe Dtr. c£ Nursing in Jefferson Oiy, MO 
Both fiscal & personnel mgm'l are inte- 
gral components of Ihe position Ind'dg 
budgeting, long nnge planning, qualify 
of patient ore a day-io-dry problem 
solving. The Ideal candidate should be 
in RN & have $-10 yrs of supervisory 
op ft proven mgtnt skills. Interested 
candidates should submit your resume 
In confidence to: Jefferson City Medical 
Group, Attn: Scon Baker, Assist Admin., 
200 St Man/s Medical Man, Ste 1302, 
Jefferson Ctry, M0 65101, 

(573)636-3763. EOE. 



If you have placed classified 
nilvcrllslug with the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may re- 
ceive a misleading statement 
Trorn another firm request- 
ing payment Tor this advertis- 
ing. To receive proper cred- 
it to your account.- all pay- 
ments for your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

130 S, Whitney St. 
Grayalakc. IL 6O03O-02G8 



HABILITATION AIDES 

Frances House, Inc., an 
agency serving the needs of 
developmenlalty disabled 
adults is seeking qualified 
individuals to staff our new 
group hone on the northsidc of 
Waukegan. Excellent starting 
slalary, free meals, insurance 
available. All shifts are avail- 
able. Please apply at 860 
South Lewis Ave., Wkgn, 
(847)244-2312. EOE. 



PHYSICAL 
REHAB. AIDE 

Small North Shore 

skilled Nursing Home is 

looking for a Certified 

Physical Rehab. Aide. 

Recent Graduates 

Welcomed. 

Call Sandra at 



paMBMtWPWMMHHBMBII P BWBa 



Call 

223-8161 



* -* •■- ** ■* -* *•* •* -^ ** ** *J*-**S*-^^\£\**, ' 

CiNA | 

Experienced ij 
CNAs 
Wanted |j 

If You Are a Caring |J 

Individual our Long {! 

Term Care Facility is p 

Looking For You! We [1 

Have Full and Part- ij 

Time Positions ij 

Available on All Shifts, tj 

Contact Belinda or Jj 
Apply in Person At: }i 

North Shore Terrace lj 

2222 W. 14th Street ij 
Waukegan, IL 60085 ij 

(847) 249-2400 Sj 

Equal Opportunity Employor i* 
it 



! UWorRiV 



SSSSS 



—■ 



to dispense Meds 3 
times a day at 
Group Home. 

We pay $12.00 a visit. | 
Please call: 

847-244-2312 ! 



mu mm mmmamam 



■ 



LPN 

ilmmediate opening 
for full time LPN in 
our intermediate 
care facility for DD 
women. 

Four 10 hour days.; 

8pm - 6am. 

If interested call 

Director 

ofNursing 

(847)438-50501 

Mt. St. Joseph 



RN/LPN 

AM shift. Part 

Time/Full Time 

Available at 

Retirement 

House for 

Sisters. Call: 

SR. Mary Lynn 

(847)438-54701 

dueeti 
\o£ Sieacel 



Nursing Center u 



C H I LLC REST 



: CNA'S 

Z • $7.00/Hr. to Start 
% • Great Benefits 
% • Excellent Working 
Z Conditions 
Z m Fantastic Opportunity 

5 Apply in Person: 5 

^ 1740 N. Circuit Dr. * 
* Round Lake Beach, IL ; 

V (Behind Burger King on Rollins Rd.) V 

M V. 



¥ 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
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220 



Help Wanted 
Full Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



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WELDER 

1st Shift. 
Experience in 
Mig Welding. 

Apply in person 



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| Z & L Machining jj 

I 3140 Central Ave. | 
Waukegan, IL 

■EBEct.BEeBeBCEBEBBr.crrca 



FT/FT SALES 
for Art Gallery 

Experience preferred 
butnotnecc. Must be 
reliable & responsible. 

Days/ Evening hours. 
Call Karen at 

(847) 855-9222 

or fax resume to 

(312) 372-8582. 

EOE 



] PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS f 

I Triad Circuits, Inc. I 

i is now hiring experienced help in: ^ 



A 
A 
A 
A 

A 



• Plating Department 

• Photo Tech. 



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J Minimum 1 year experience in the[ 
2 manufacturing of printed circuits 
^boards required. Benefits include^ 
^paid vacation, holidays and personal r 
jdays. Health, Dental & Lifer 
3 Insurance. Please apply in person at: f 



A 

A 

A 

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1 



703 N. Sunset 
Round Lake, IL 



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k 
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J Call: 847-546-7722 1 



NO ASSEMBLY!! 



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A 

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■ ' 



How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 



Dear Search, 
1 contacted an ad in the newspaper for job as a receptionist. 
The person on the phone screening the calls asked about 
my previous receptionist skills for which I had over 2 years 
experience. The next question asked is still puzzling so I am 
asking if you have ever heard of the term "rome or roam sys- 
tem?" I have asked a few people but none who has ever 
heard of the term. Thanks. 
LA.--Lakc Blurf 

Dear L.A., 

The name "Rolm" refers to the manufacturer of a very pop 

ular 'telephone system often referred to as the "Rolm Sys 

tern." Rolm is very popular among mid to large sized cor 

porations, known for its diverse ability and case. Hope this 

helps. 

Dear Search, 
My husband took a management position with a nationally 
known retailer about 14 months ago with the knowledge 
that it is policy -to rotate managers to other locations 
approximately every 2 years. During his hiring process this 
was a non-negotiable point. He has been advised that he is 
to be transferred in January to a store in the U.S. that is not 
a desireablc location. My husband has refused to approach 
his Regional Director telling us Uiat this is the nature of his 
business. If he did, how would you recommend he 
approach his boss to express his desire not to relocate to 
that particular location? Wc have settled into our area we 
are currently In, made lots of wonderful friends and prefer 
not to have to make the move. 
G.S.-Lake Villa 

DearG.S., 

It is hard for me to comprehend through your letter 
whether or not your husband has the same feelings about 
making die move as you appear to. Therefore, I'll only sug- 
gest, to you that before your husband would make any 
attempt to speak to his "higher uppers," that he weigh out 
the alternative, and that is to prepare one's self for the pos- 
sibility that the boss could ask for his resignation. That js 
providing that this was as you called it a "non-negotiable 
point." In business as In everyday life...we must take the 
good with the bad. While two years is a relatively short perl 
od of time I am hoping that upon his acceptance of this 
position, he understood the relocation clause. If his intcn 
tions are to stay with the company, find an area to live in 
that suits you all. Even if it means being a bit further away 
from his office. Perhaps riding a train to work instead of 
driving an added distance could help balance both. 

Note*. Nancy Sakol is a licensed personnel professional and 
President of Superior Personnel in Gurnee. 

Letters can be sent to Nancy Sakol c/o Lakelan 
Newspapers, P.O. Box 2.68, Graysfeke, IL 60030 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full Time 



Tl Help Wanted 
JJ FuU-Timc 



PICK *N' PACK 

$7.00 to start. 90 day increase! Pleasant environ- 
ment, nice boss, happy employees. Call today: 
(847) 549-0016 Vernon PIllls 
(847) 244-0016 Gurnee 



j peri or JLefaonnel 



] HVAC I 
} SERVICE TECH.; 

i hvac certified service ^ 
a lech, needed for w 
j busy company. t 
Z insurance & Benefits. £ 

call: : 

} 847-265-1400 [ 



I 



Line Cook and 

Banquet & 

Dining Room 

Waitress Wanted... 

Andre's Steak House 

11106 U.S. Route 12 
Apply in Person! 

For more info: 

(815) 678-2671 



J 




HOLIDAY DEBTS. 

We offer: 

* 59.61/Hoiii » Paid Training 

* We Cater to Your Child Care Needs < Convenient Part-time hours 
•Paid Holidays 'Bonuses 

PARTTIME JOBS AVAILABLE IN: 
MUNDELEIN, PRAIRIE VIEW, WHEELING, LAKE CO. - SPECIAL ED. 

r 



847-634-0331 



NATIONAL SCHOOL BUS 
SERVICE, INC. 

Equal Opportunity Employer M/F 



Get your foot in 
the door! 

Expanding Composition 

Department is seeking innovative 

individuals in the Graphic Arts • 

Field who know their way around 

a Macintosh computer. This entry 

level position requires emphasis 

on typesetting, ad design, and 

deadlines. 

Fax Resume to 

(847)223-8810 

Lakeland 

NcwfcfuipcrB 



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LIBERmiLLE BANK 

Teller /Full or Part Time 

We are seeking an individual with an 
energetic personality who enjoys work 
ing with people. Duties include servicing 
customers and handling bank transac- 
tions. Previous teller or cash handling 
experience a plus but not necessary. 

We offer a competitive salary, benefits 
and flexible work schedule. Apply in 
person at: 

Libertyville Bank 

1509 IN. Milwaukee Aye. 
Libertyville, IL 60048 

or by phone: 

1-888-563-0567 Ext. 597 

or fax resume to D. Spinner 

847-680-9492. 

EOE. 



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I 



I 



r i^i Help Wanted 
J-J Full-Time 



WAREHOUSE 

Vernon Hills mail 
order distributor 
has openings for 
order fillers and 

receivers. 

Call Scott 

(847) 291-7755 



Drivers/CDL 

Immed openings. 
More Pay Means: 

• Top conventlonafs 

• Top bonefits 

• Solo's start up to 
29.5c/ml 

1 • Teams-Special runs- 
start up to 38e/ml 

• Mostly drop & hook 
| * 60% Texas freight 

1 • Teams home weekly 
| • Min. 3 mo exp & up 
1 • 800+ truck fleet, grow- 
1 Ing w/Driver In mind 
| • Open 7a-7p, 7 days/wk I 

CONSOUDATDAJ.! 
800-304-3410 i 



i 
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Telo marketing 

MAKEYOURMARK 

wrra 



SIGNATURE 



SROl IP 



Tho Signature Group, a 
Montgomory Ward allillato, has 
boon a loodor in tho tolorrmrkollng 
industry lor over 25 yoars . Wa have 
(usi opened our nowost location In 
Waukog an, Illinois. ' 

Wo are seeking onorgoilc, cus- 
tomer-driven associates to |oin us. 
Day and evening positions are 
avaSablo. Work during (he wok 
and have your weekends to your' 
soil. 

No exporionce necessary. We pro- 
vide sales and computer training 
lor candidates with great reading 
skills thai like lo work on the phono, 
II you share In our commlmenl lo 
excellence, you can make your 
mark In the Industry, and we'll 
reward you with: 

•Generous starting salary 
•■t Increases during your first year 
•Paid holidayAracalion 
•Professional environmenl 
•Montgomory Ward discount 

DONT DBLAY-CAU.TODAY 

(847) 599-2900 

Ve ire an Equal Opponimlry EmjilojiT 



JMaintenance/l 
HVAC 

| Due to continuous growth) 
[and .Internal promotions,! 
JQulll, one of the nation's! 
(leading distributors ol ofiicoj 
(supplies, is seeking an lndi-1 
ivldual to handle general! 
(maintenance at our beautiful? 
(Lincolnshire campus. 

This key person should havel 
many ol the following attrlb-j 

ulos: 



CFC Certification 
Good troubleshooting 
skills 

Ability to repair con- 
veyors and lift trucks 
Some welding 
Cross training 

> HVAC experience 

1 Knowledge of 440V- 
480V 3 phase power 

• Minor plumbing and 
carpentry 

•Team player 

j Quill offers groat opportunity! 
I as well as outstanding bono- 
| fits. The available shift ls| 
1 7am to 3:30pm 

| To apply, pleaso fax, mall or J 
jcomo In and fill out an appll- 
pcntlon to: 

Quill Corporation 

100 Schaller Rd 

Human Resources 

Lincolnshire, IL 60069 

FAX: (847) 634-5820. 

No phono calls please. 

Equal Opportunity Em ploy or | 

MVF/D/V 

mif/ir 

HtanpdMWmHlllifllwt^'. 



220 



Wanted 
Full-Time 



Help 



220 



Help Wanted 
FiUI-Time 



3P 



Engineering 

MECO KEW ORLEANS l 

Mechanical Equlpmenl Co. a 
world leader In tho design & con- 
struction ol desalination & water 
purification equipment Is seek- 
ing qualified candidates tor the 
position of: 

PROJECT ENGINEER 
Successful candidates will pos- 
sess a BS In Mechanical or 
Chemical Engineering & a mln. 
of 3 yrs exp In the design ol 
water purlltcaUon equipment. An 
MS Is prel'd. MECO olfers an 
exc. compensation pkg, benefits, 
a comp. reloc pkg, opportunities 
for ongoing professional devet 
opmont at a tocala w/lowsr taxes 
& cost of IMng w/mlld wlntorsl 
Qualified Individuals should mall 
or fax (504) 599-4205 resume 
w/salary history to: 
MECO Human Resources 
861 Carondolet St. 

New Orleans, LA 70130 
EOE WF/D/V 



Dietary Aide 

Our long ; term care facil- 
ity is seeking an individ- 
ual to join our Dieta/y 
Department. Your duties 
will Include dishwash- 
ing, tray set-up and 
serving. 

For. more information 
please call Pauline or 
apply in person at: 

North Shore 
Terrace 

2222 W.'l4th Street 
Waukegan, IL 60084 

(847) 249-2400 

Equal Opportunity 
Employer 



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I ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 

TEMP TO PERM • $12.00 PER HOUR 
■ Our client (Fortune 200-Llncolnshlre) Is seeking an Adm. 
■ Assistant to work In the Legal Depl. for approx, 2-3 months] 
■i (opportunity for full time employment). Legal experience helpful. ' 
JMust know MS Word (Power Point and Excel added plus.) 
Fox resume (847) 740-8405 or call (847) 740-8367, 



SAVE $1.00 

Save $1 .00 off your next word rate ad, when 
you use your Visa, Discover, or Mastercard to 
pay for the ad. 

Contact Lisa at 
(847) 223-8161 ext 140 

to place your ad 

CSS 9B Si 



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School EiyiployiviENT 



SliBSTmiTE DmECIORY 

The following schools need substitutes on a 

continuing basis, please contact the names 

listed below for further information. 

Antioch C. C. School Dist. 34 

850 Highview Dr., Anlioch, II. 60002 

Contact: Kathyor Rose (847) 395-0712 

Aptakisic - Tripp School Dist. 102 
1231 Weiland Rd„ Buffalo Grove, 11.60089 

Contact: Laurel Karolczak (847) 634-5338 

Dccrflcld School Dist. 109 
517 DcerRcld Rd., Dccrficld, IL 60015 

Contact: Phyllis (847) 945-1844 x222 

Fox Lake School District #114 
17 N. Forest Avenue, Fox Lake, II. 60020 

Contact: Rayna (847) 587-7311 

Grayslakc Community High School Dist. 127 
400 N. Lake Street, Grayslake, IL 60030 

Contact: Lana Mtulolc (847) 223-8621 xl210 

Hawthorn School District 73 

201 Hawthorn Parkway, Vernon Hills, 11.60061 

Contact: Mary Tell (847) 367-3279 

Immaculate Conception 

510 Grand Ave,, Waukegan, IL 60085 

Contact: Kathleen Whalen or Carol Drew (847) 623-41 10 

Lake Forest Elementary Schools 
95 W. Dccrnalh, Lake Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Karen Alllc -(847) 234-6010 si 17 

Libertyville School Dist. 70 
1441 W. Lake Si., l.ibcrtyviile, IL 60048 

Contact: Carole Shinton (847) 362-9023 

North Chicago Community Unit School Dist. 187 
2000 Ijewis Ave. North Chicago, 11.60064 

Contact: Mrs. A. Shcrrod (847)689-8150x254 

North Shore School Dist 112 

530 Red Oak Ln, Highland Park, IL 60035 

Contact: Laurie Maclntyre (847) 831-4370 

Prince of Peace 

135 S. Milwaukee Are., Lake Villa, 11. 60046 

Contact: David Worklan .\ . . . (847) 356-61 1 1 

Richmond Durton High School 
10006 Main St., Richmond, IL 60071 

Con/act: Mary Anne Gaylord (815) 678-4525 

Special Education of Lake County 
18160 Gages Lake Rd., Gages Lake, IL 60030 

Contact: Pat Wichlin (847) 548-8470 x204 

Spring Grove School 

2018 Main Si., Spring Grove, 11.60081 

Contact: Kathleen Mahr (815) 675-2342 

St. Gilbert School 

231 lv. Belvlderc Rd., Grayslakc, IL 60030 

Contact: Sr. Elaine (847) 223-8600 

St. Joseph's School 

1 18 N. Lincoln, Round Lake, IL 60073 

Contact: Jeanne Petkus, Princ. or Maureen Crccden . .(847) 546-1720 

Zion Elementary School Dist. 6 

220 Bethesda Blvd., Zion, IL 60099 

Contact: Karen Baughman , (847) 872-5455 



NoviMbER l? r ; t996 /f ,UkE^Ncl .Newspapers ... ^lASSIff EQ 




220 



Help Wanted 
Full Tune- 



220 



Hdp Wanted 
Full-Time 



1 



Look forward to work each day 

Seeking 2 self-starting individuals with customer ser 
vice ability and a "pitch, in" attitude 



1 



(847) 549-0016 Vernon Hills 



(847) 244-0016 Gurnec 

jperior Jtertonnel 



\o 



tf> 



Jii 



in 



iff 

^otuSoXjSvUrV 

We are looking for 
qualified Individuals for 
the following positions: 

• Front Deslc Clerks 

• Banquet Supervisor 

• Maintenance Worker 

• Night Audit Clerk 

We offer excellent benefits 

that include: 

Health insurance, vacation 

■ pay and employee meals. 

Please apply in person at: 

Holiday Inn Mundeleln 

510 East Route 83 

Mundeleln, IL 60060 

(847) 949-5100 

E/O/E 



FUNDING/ 

AUDITING 

PROCESSOR 

;Gurnee based Eaglet 
i Finance Corp. is currently j 
i seeking a funding/auditing j 
! processor to process docu- 
| mentation for loan portfo-j 
ilios and loan payments, 
i Qualified candidates mustj 
I be detail oriented, j 
| Preference will be given to 
j applicants with experience j 
I In automobile finance andi 
1 dealer relations. 

Please call any time to 
complete an automated 
telephone application: 

1-800-549-0841 
Ext. 2010 




' 



BW 



„* 



CHARMILLES TECHNOLOGIES 

[Charmilles Technologies Corporation, North America's leading j 
[distributor and technical service support provider for high pro- 
vision, computer controlled Electrical Discharge Machining! 
I(EOM) equipment, software and parts, Is seeking qualifled| 
■Individuals to fill the following challenging career positions: 

^•Applications Engineers for Lincolnshire and 

East and West Coast Offices 
\ •Field Service Engineers for Midwest and East 
Coast regions 
•Parts/Inventory Specialists for Lincolnshire 
•Customer Service Representatives for 

Lincolnshire 
*WS/hWWAN/MS - Office/Netware (Junior- 
senior positions) for Lincolnshire 
IA.1I positions require hands-on computer skills. We offer a] 
[generous benefits package, Incl. three weeks PTO, compa- 
lny-pald hoallhcaro Insurance, and 401 (k) plan. 
1 Fax or mall resumes with salary roqulromenta/hlatary to: 

Human Resources Dept. - H2 

Charmilles Technologies Corporation 

560 Bond St. 

Lincolnshire, IL 60069-4224 

Fax (847) 913-5340 

Phase - no phono calls 
Et{ual Employment Opportunity Employer 



EXCELLENT CAREER 
OPPORTUNITY!! 

Are you friendly and outgoing? Do 
you like meeting people? This posi- 
tion is for you!!! Lakeland 
Newspapers is -seeking a Full-time 
receptionist to join our award winning 
staff in an exciting industry. Please 
fax or mail your resume to: Attn: 
Mimi Koob, Lakeland Newspapers, 
P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030. 
Fax (847) 223-8810 



mmem 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



mmmmmmmmm 



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Teachers & 
Assistants 

If you want to make a 

difference in' a child's 

life, call Kalhy 

(847) 634-1982 



COOK : 

Full-time position for ! 
our group home for the ■ 

developmental^ 
disabled. Minimum 24 \ 

hours a week. 
Sanitation certificate r 
preferred. Split shifts, ■ 
benefits, competitive \i 
salary. Apply at 

j Waukegan Terrace JJ 

860 S. lewis Ave., ^ 

1(847)244-2312." 

EOE : 

{■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■a 



WALK FOR PAY! 



Hand Advertising In 

selected neighborhoods. 

Flexible hours 

Call 



CASHIER 

Cashier/Salad Bar 

'MarrieW Toad- Service, 

Monday - Friday 

7am-3:30pm 

Bannockburn area 

(847) 940-7824 



POSTAL JOBS 

$l2.68/hr. to start, plus bene- 
fits. Carriers, sorters, decks, 
computer trainees. For appli- 
cation and exam Info, call 
1-800-636-5601 exLP9509. 
8am-8pm 7 days. 



Lake County 
Retnodeler needs 

F/T laborer. 
Steady wo rkl 

Call nowtt 
(847) 587-0856 



Engineering 
SENIOR ELECTRICAL/ ! 
SOFTWARE ENGINEER ! 
Must haw 5+ ysars ot 'Hands-On"; 
microprocessor design experience* • 
with embedded systems, PLCs, Man-' ', 
Machine Interfaces, and be Interested; ; 
In progressing within our growing < - 
engineering group. A BSEE Is! ', 
required, however eqiivalenl expert-; j 
ence will be considered. We service i i 
the Graphic Arts and Converting! 
Industry as a leading supplier ol spe- 
cialty machinery, electrostatic equip-. 
ment and specialty registration con-: 
troll Positions available In Fox Lake 
and Richmond. Compensation wJI be 
commensurate wtth education and] 
experience. Send your resume, WITH 1 
LOCATION REFERENCE, to: 

Attn: BoxT 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers < 

PO Box 268 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

EOEM/RD/V 

H MMMMM II MMMM 



DRIVERS 




>merry 
maids. 



847-970-5380 



p 



Lake Villa 
Schools 

District 41 

Has the following 

positions now 

available: 

• Teacher's Aides 

• Part-Time Social 
Worker 

• Part-Time Learning 
Disabilities Teacher 

• Bus Drivers 

Apply in person or call 
District Office at: 

131 McKiniey 
Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2385 



FULL/PT 

[Positions available 
Wau&ekeepuifr 

Flexible hours 

Excellent 
Advancement 
Opportunities. 

Please Apply in 

Person: 
Budgetel Inn 

J688 North Ridge 

Rd. 
Gurnee, IL 60031 

At (he intersection of 
94 & Grand Ave. 



TELEMARKETING 

EARN UP TO $500 

Extra Cash In 
Your Pocket!! 

Dairy Pay, no experience 

necessary. Start today, 

Full or Part Time. 

Mundotein 

(847) 949-9240 



■BBBBBBBBBBBOBBOBB* 

I GENERAL g 
^ OFFICE/DATA EMTRY 1 

B 
B 
B 
B 




g WANTED I 

J$$ Earn that Extra Cash $$J 
A Residential delivery. | 

Small car and 
A insurance necessary. • 
Mundeleln 5 
S (84?) 949-91401 



B 

i 

g Assist the bookkeeper In 

B 

B 

B 

B 

p ety. FT permanent posl 
g tion. FuUbenellta. Send 



Data Entry, AR and other E 
duties. Small office vari- E 



tion. FuUbenellta. 
g resume or apply In person: g 

B H 

b Lube Oils Inc. B 
' 345 Skokle Hwy 

Gurnee, IL 60031 g 

g 847-249-2330 g 

■BBBBBEHBEBEEBBBBBB 



jAuto Service; 
Technician 

JlArea's largest state-ot-the-f, 
Jart auto center Is currently! 
'cooking 2 ASE cortlfledf 
^technicians to compliments 
jour growth. Competitive!; 
iwages & benefits. 

Apply in person or 
call for interview 

NORTBTOWN AUTO 
&TIRE CENTER 

3800 McCullom Lake Rd. 

McHenry, IL 

(Next to Wal-Mart) 

(815) 363-2886 



SjJct 

ENTRY LEVEL SALES 

A leading distributor of innova- 
tive maintenance repair prod- 
ucts is looking for ambitious 
man and women to join our 
learn, selling consumables to 
the Industrial aftcrmarkets, 

• Salary + commissions 
Extensive training 

• Repeat sales 

• Complete benefits 

The successful candidate 
should have a college degree 
and/or 1-3 years sales experi- 
ence, FAX or mall resume to: 
Beth Kuiy 
PREMIER FARNELL 
CORP. 
P.O. BOX 5 150 
CLEVELAND, OH 44 1 1 -O J 50 
FAX: 216-3*51-9566 
E.EO.M/F/D 




(feed Deugh? 

We Deliver! 

tfew Hiring 

Delivery Drivers 

Earn over 
ilOOfj PER HOUR 

WDRHNC TOR Tl IE WORLDS tAAGEfT PEZA DBJVOTf a WW. 

Earn over S400 Dollars per month 

WORKING AS inTLE AS 10 HOURS FEU WEEK. 

Domino's Pizza Is now hiring for the 
following posl lions 

DELIVERY PERSONS: 

5 part lime and f J lime positions available. 




Bauble scheduling. Fun tost paced envi- 
ronmenL Must be 18 or cm Have a 
car and Insurance, Days and 
I evenings available, Must be available » 

Friday and/or Sarunlaycvming. 

APPLY AT: 

FOX LAKE ANTIOCH 

|]15S.Ri. 12 «8UlcSl. 

587-4666 838-3030 



gThe Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society isg 

Hseeking an experienced senior level man-a 

§ager to direct operations of its Great Lakes § 

H Auxiliary. Candidates must have the abili-g 

Hly to recruit, motivate and work with voi-a 

§ unteers and have a commitment to human § 

H service needs. Essential qualificationsa 

ainclude: proven leadership, management a 

g capability, basic psychology, and superior g 

H communication skills. Desirable qualities: a 

gin-depth knowledge of military structure g[ 

a and practical knowledge of principles and a 

B practices of casework. Starting salary a 

g $35,088. Applications may be obtained g 

a from the Great Lakes Auxiliary Office, a 

gBLDG 42, 2701 N. Sheridan Rd., Greatg 

g Lakes, IL 60088, and returned by 27 g 

a November 1 996. eoe a 

a a 

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W ^iKimimimimiKimiin 




CASHIER 

[Wanted for gas sta-l 
tion with car wash. 
Full & Part time | 
[available. Excellent j 
health benefits &' 
I uniforms provided. 

45&83 

Nundelein Shell. 
(847) 566-0890 

Brunswick Corp.! 
Lake Forest 

Skilled Cook needed J 
for upscale executive! 
cafeteria. Must be moti- u 
vated and willing toy 
assist in all areas of j 
business. Good pay,'' 



excellent opportunity! 
for 



S 



s 

s 



Earn Extra Income!! 
Be Your Own Boss!! j 

Our Delivery Service is g 
g expanding and we are look- | 
| ing for Adult, Independent | 
Contractors to deliver our 
products in all areas of 
_ Grayslake/Gurnee. Must 
ihave insured, reliable vehicle, f 

| For more information call: ^ 

| (847) 223-8161 art. 173 1 

a - - . • -•„_•_ g 



I 

advancement. Full J 
Benefits, M-F work- y 
week (days). y 

Call Charles i 
after 1 p.m. 

(847) 735-4290 J 



1 

8 

8 



i 

8 

8 




8 
I 
1 




CR. 
Styles 

in 
Barrington 

Is now hiring. Established 
hair salon with creative, 
friendly atmosphere Is tak- 
ing applications for: 

* FT Stylist • PT Salon 

Receptionist * 

PT Shampoo Help. 

We're expanding rast, 

Call today! 

(847) 381-3688 



Major Franchise 225 Room 

Hotel, under renovation, bos 

tbe following openings: 

• Housekeeping 

• Front Desk Agent 

• Wait Staff 

Good work environment. 
Excellent possibility for 
advancement. Apply at the 

GURNEE 

# 

1-^pMtuj^YUrv 
6161 W. Grand • Gumae, IL 
60031 or Fax 847-336-9143 



TECHNICIAN-TV/VCR 
Yosomito Nat'l Park 
Exp'd Tech needed tor a growing 
factory authorized dealership 
loe'd In a beautiful mtn communl 
ty w/grsat echls & low crime. A 
great place to raise a family. Exc. 
pay & bens. (209) 683-0208, EOE I 
i ■ l 



************************ 

:$$holdwcash$$: 

j Distribute the New * 
t Ameritech Directories in* 



the following areas: 



DRIVERS 
NEEDED! 

Need Class H C" license. 

Hours are Monday 

through Friday 7:30am- 

4pm. Local pick-up and 

deliveries. 



For more information or 
for an interview call: 

(847) 680-4545 



NOW HIRING! 

Northbrook Court 

Cinema 14 

1525 Lako Cook Road 

Northbrook 

Join the team now for full 

and part-lime positions 

and enjoy these benefits. 

Competitive wages - 
flexible schedules • free 
movies. Pick up an appli- 
cation at the Lakehurst 
Cinema boxoffice. 
Specify Northbrook Court 
on application 
EOE 



CUSTOMER SERVICE 

OUR FORTUNE 500 Clients 
need your customer service 
accounting & admlnistralive, 
general office, data entry 
skills for long term and temp- 
lo-parm assignments. We 
offer competitive salary. 
Please cell Nencl at: 
Express Personnel 
Services 
(B47) 816-8422 
or Fax (847) 816-0888 
WE OFFER THE LEADING 
HEALTH CARE PACKAG- 
ING IN THE PERSONNEL 
SERVICES INDUSTRY! 



BBBBBBDRI 

HOME COMPUTER 
USERS NEEDED 

j $45,000 Income potential 
1-800-513-4343 

Ext. B-4458 
Caff for details. 

ZODBnOBBBHBBBUBuyaSQC 



jBarrington, Lake Zurich,* 

; Wauconda and sur- I 

rounding areas. * 

* For Information Call: * 

I 1-800-369-7225 : 

* * 
************************ 

iii!i!i;iiij[i]iiiiirii!i;i:ini[iiiiii:iiiiiin!ii!;i;niii[[iii! 

HVAC SHEET 

METAL 
INSTALLER 

HVAC Experience 

sheet metal Installer 

needed. Insurance 

and benefits. 

Call: 

847-265-1400. 

iniiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiuuiiiiniDiiii I 



MAIL 
ROOM 

Labeling, 
inserting and 

sorting 

newspapers. 

Fast paced and 

friendly 
environment. 
Mondays & 
Thursdays from 
5:30-3:00pm. 
Fridays on an 
on-call basis. 

For more 

information 

call: 

847-223-8161 

x135 



[CUSTOMER! 
SERVICE 

Fast paced call 

center needs 

customer service 

reps. Will train 

right candidate. 

Call Bobbie: 

mi) 191-7755 



■ E EEEECeSEEeEEEEBBEBEBBa 

£ Engineering B 

$. DIE DESIGNER 

| Winston-Salem, NC 

b For "High Speecftermlnalstamp-B 

ping dies. Must possess Auto Cade 

cor equivalent skills, open to tansi- £ 

jjtion to leadership role. We're | 

h ready to recognize your talent | 

b show us! Comp. sal/bens pkgsB 

p w/retoc. assist. Send resume to: § 

PRECISION CONCEPTS, 2701 1 

Boulder Pk Ct, Wlnstoo-Salem, \ 

NC 27101, attn: Engineering Mgr. B 

BBBBBBBBE EEEE ECET BBOBBI 



DATA ENTRY/ 

CUSTOMER 

SERVICE 

EXPERIENCED 

Apply in person: 

STUDENT SERVICES, LLC. 
2550 CoMMOWEAJih Ave. 

NoRTll CrliCAQO, IL 

or call: 

(847) 785-8000 



HOSPITALITY 
PROFESSIONALS 

Carolina s/Florida 
4 yr. deg. & hotel exp. places you 
In a mgm't career w/us. We offer 
the tastea growth opptys nation- 
wide. Due to promotions, wo have 
openings tor you! Generous bens. 
New hotels opening. Fax res. to 

Adam's Mark Hotel 
"Opportunities" 

910/721-2260 EOE 



It Pays to 

Advertise 

Place your private 
party classified 

ads on Visa, 
Mastercard, or 
Discover and 
save a #1.00. 
To place your ad 
with your credit 
card, call Lisa at 

(847) 223-8161 
ext 140. 




£I^S,SIFI ED : : UkelANd ,NE)vspApERS s IVpvEMqcR 1.5, jS&fcoK 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-TIme 



] 



220 



Help Wasted 
Full-Tlme 



Government Jobs- tatai 

Conservation, Civil Servjav Forestry. 
Instruction booklets, sample tests and 
applications, $29.95 + S&H, Money 
Order, Check or Credit Card, Federal 
Employment Job Services, Inc, S365 
W. Atlantic Avwiuc, Suite 501 , Delray 
Beach, FL 33404 

1-800-86T-8949 



Earn extra cash for X-mas. 
Be your own boss, work your 
own hours & earn up to 50%. 
profit. No door to door. Freo 
gifts. Call now. Indep. Hep. 

Tina 000-303-5260 

H— *■■■ ■■■■ ■ ■ ■■■■■*■■ ! 



225 



Business 
Opportunities 



ijoHoooaaHBOonanBoanaaHaii 

SHELP WANTED! 

S Earn up to $500 per week B 
| assembling products at ! 

Shome. No experience, a 
a INFO: 1-504-646-1700 | 

i DEPT. IL-2878 
n i 

HBOQaQBaODQBQQQBHUBaQWgu 

i Laborers For : 
Roofing 

i RFG Full-Time 

<• must have own 
2 tools/transportation 
*• year round work 
J* willing to train 
V good starting pay 

A Call Svaras at 

i (847) 526-2304 : 

< and leave a message > 



GOVT POSIAL JOBS 

•Now Hiring tor "1 997"* 

Start $16.74 HR. 

For appL & info, call: 

1-(818)-506-5354 

Ext. 6028 



HOME BASED BUSINESS 

Jewel/Teas General Stores 

and J/T Network. Great 

potential money earnings. 

More information call Vito 

(847) 989-9899. 

MAKE $2,200 IN 5-DAYS. 

Let me show you how. 
Call 1-800-995-0796 
ext. 9838. 

inn nnnrmnrrnnnmnnmr; 

PERSON WANTED 

to OWN and operate retail 
candy shop In Grayslako 
area. Low Investment. For 
Information call Mrs. Burden's 
Gourmet Candy Company, 
Dallas, TX. (214)991-6239. 

DDOaaaODDDDOnDDDCDDDDt 



Form-Fill-Seal 

• Packaging Machinery 

• Mechanic/General 

• Maintenance Person 

For 4:30pm to lam 

shift. Full Time/Part 

Time, Permanent/ 

Temporaiy. 

Rt.4l m 
Highland Park 

(847) 831-9400 x22 



228 


Situations Wanted 



CREATE AN HEIRLOOMi 

Customized embroidery and 
monogramrning. Christening 
gown, premie, bridal, special 
occasslons. Nursery and 
home decorating. Sewing and 
alterations. (847) 587-0865 
Edie. 



240 



Child Care 




AIRLINE JOBS! 

Now hiring. $ 10-525 peri 
hour. All positions, skilled [ 
and un-skilled. Excellent] 
pay/be nefils. 

Call 1-504-429-9229. 
Ext. 4584 A45 24 hours. , 

■uniRTiniiiirnfRnnrnrrfT'rrc'ntJi 



Help Wanted 

Experienced 

Heating & Cooling | 

Technician 

Must have experience, 

Must know mechanical. 

Good pay & excellent 

opportunity for 

advancement. 

*Year round work* 

Please call 

356-3005 

Ask for Lisa 



| CASHIERS I 

All shifts! 
CLARK OIL 

704 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

Libortyvillo, IL 

(Near Metra Station) 

See Pam or Mike 



(N 



Customer 

Service 

Manager 

Full Time, some nlghls. 
Small Grocery chain. Fun 
atmosphere! Experience 
preferred but willing to 
irain. Apply In person. 
(No phone calls please) 

Franklin Foods 

1141 S. Milwaukee Ave 

Libertyville 




An Ohio Oil company 

needs mature person 

now In the GRAYSLAKE 

area. Regardless of 

experience, write: 

J.T. Read, P.O. Box 696, 

Dayton, OH 45401 . 



2 Early Morning Hours 5 
H COUNTER HELP § 

Daytime Hours n 

Bon Jour Bagol Gala In Gloncoo. g 
Apply to Mgr. Northbrook Villogo 3 
Square Moll, 39 Skoklo Blvd. nrE 
Lake Cook Rd, 
M Call Laurie, 847/714-9800 



CASE MANAGER/ 

PROTECTIVE 
SERVICE WORKER 

Manage diverse case toad of 
elderly home bound clients, 
Investigate cases of elder 
abuse & neglect & provide 
case work. MA/MSW 4 experi- 
ence preferred. Drivers license 
required. Send resume to: 
Kathleen Perkins 

Catholic Charities 
116 N.Lincoln Ave. 

Round Lake, IL 60073 
EOE - Smoke free environment 



Our Lake Forest 

Dental Practice is 

looking tor a unique individ- 
ual to fill Immediate open- 
ing. II you are a lun, ener- 
getic people person this 
could be the job tor you. 
Groat hours and attractive 
hourly rate. Call 
(847) 234-8608 
I fo schedule an Interview. 



BABYSITTER AVAILABLE 
IN YOUR HOME, 2-3 week- 
nights, or weekends, 17year 
old in Fox Lake area, has own 
transportation. References 
available. (847) 587-5626. 

CHILD CARE IN my Haryan 
Farms Home in Grayslake. All 
ages. Prices negotiable. At 
your convenience. (847) 
223-6165. 

LITTLE TREASURES 

HOME DAY CARE 

Has moved to Lake Villa, 

vicinity Rt. 83 & Monaville. 

*6am-6pm 

*Blg fenced yard 

'Learning fun 

*l5yrs. experience 

*3 Openings 

•Ages 1-5yrs. 

*Non-smoker 

•CPR/FIrsl Aide 

(847)356-4231. 

LOOKING FOR LOVING 
AND DEPENDABLE provid- 
er for 3 month old. Will bring 
child to your homo. Cindy 
(847) 543-9003. (Grayslake 
area). 

mom has full.time 

OPENINGS AVAILABLE for 

2yr. olds & up. Fun pre-school 
activities in clean home with 
large yard. Excellent referenc- 
es, CPR and first Aid, stale li- 
cense. Michelle (847) 

872-1964. 

NORTH WAUKEGAN I offer 
planned activities, fun loving 
environment, a caring heart, 
10yrs, experience. Excellent 
references, all ages and shifts 
welcome. (847) 625-0102, 

VERNON HILLS (NEAR 
Hawthorn Mall), licensed 
homo daycare of 9yrs. has (2) 
Infant openings. Quality care, 
tax deductible, excellent refer- 
ences. (847) 362-3739. 

WAUKEGAN EXPERI- 

ENCED PROVIDER for 

6yrs. has lots ol references 
and training. Openings for inf- 
ants to 5yrs. Michello (847) 
599-0441 tor Interview. Very 
reasonable. 

MOTHER WILL care for 
your child In my Round Lake 
home. Meats and snacks pro- 
vided. Lots of TLC. Excellent 
references. Near Village 
School. Also before and after 
school. (847) 740-0306. 



J 



JBMWSWICIij 

• Food service 5 

• help wanted • 

2 Dell/Utility person 
S needed to help out In • 
2 busy executive cafe. I 

• Great entry level 
m opportunity. Good 

2 pay, flexible hours - 2 
2 daytime M-F. We will 2 
2 train right candidate. « 

2 Call Charles 2 
after 1 PM 2 

2(847) 735-42902 



- We'll sell your camera" 

in a Hash, 

Yourdrumlnabeat, 

'Your clock In a minute! 

Lakeland Classifieds 
■L 223-8161 _1- 



AU PAIR USA 

Live-in childcare. Quality, 
screened European. Legal 
English speaking. Under 
$200 p/w. 

Amy Kritzman 
847-821-8524 

Emily Matz 
847-251-1643 



Journalism 

NEWSPAPER ADVISER 
Part-Time 

Manages operations ol college 
student newspaper. Academic 
training and experience in Jour- 
nalism required, Ability to work 
effectively with groups a must. 
Submit application and resume 
by December 16, 1996. Call 
Personnel; {847) 223-6601, exL 
2216 or TDD #(647) 223-5615 
COLLEGE OF LAKE COUNTY 
19351 W. Washington SL, 
Grayslake, IL 60030-1 198, 
AA/EOE m/l/dAr. 




301 


Antiques 



310 



Bazaars/Crafts 



310 



Bazaars/Crafts 



CANDY CANE LANE 
CRAFT SHOW 

Featuring hand-crafted gifts 

and accessories for the 

holidays and all year. 

Saturday, November 16th, 

9am-7pm. 

316 W. Golf Court 

Libertwilte. 



We'll sell your camera in 

a flash, 

Your drum In a beat, 

Your clock in a mlnutel 

Lakeland Classifieds 

223-8161 



SEVENTH ANNUAL 

SPRUCE MOOSE 

CRAFT BAZAAR 

Novomber 14th. & 15th. 

9am-9pm. 

November 16th 

9am-5pm. 

Craft displays featuring 

the creativity of 30 

crafters. Come visit our 

old fashion Christmas 

Bazaar. Beautiful crafts, 

delicious baked goods, 

holiday gift Items. 

From Wodsworth & 

Delaney Rds., North 

1-mile, turn right on 

Stlehr Rd. 

Follow signs. 



A A A AAA 



(gMULiERY 



Boanie Babies.. 
are here! 
> Clothes 
• Chairs 

. • Bods . 



• Portraits from Photos 

• Personalized Books & 
Baby Blankets 

•Albums 

• Holiday Sweat Shirts 
384 Lake SL • Antioch • X-mas Tree Skirts 

(847) 395-5550 and much, much morel! 

on! iffr M m 

Th.F 10-8 Sat 9-5, Sun 1 M 

Closed Wedl 
Gift Certificates & Layawey AvalaUo 





Ninth Annual Holiday 
Arc & Craft Ffllrc 

Village ol" bland Ukc 

Recreation Adviwry Board 

Frtday.Novembcr22.1996 

11 a.m to 8 p.m. 
Saturday November M, 1996 
9im.to4pm 

Uhnd Lake Village Hall 

3720 SrccnSeaf Avenue 

bland lake. lUmot* 

ffourbbek.northofP.tf76) 

SI Ad it. i« ion 

(RsFFle Ticket Included) 

Unique Quality 

Handcrafted 5ft Item* 

RafFlc for llandcraFted Item* 

fbod/Rcfre*hn!ent*/I)ake Sale 

(Proceed* Benefit the Recreation 
Program - Village of Uland Lake) 






INSULATION, 4X8 

SHEETS follback foam: also 
rolls of silver bubble pak insu- 
lation. Panicle board & 3 tab 
shingles. All factory seconds. 
Contact Ken Nichols, 728- 
4217 or 1-800-424-1256. 

STEEL BUILDINGS, DEAL- 
ER cancellations! Garages 
and shops: 25'x28'; 30'x40\ 
Up to 45% savings. Farm 
structures: 40'x46\ 45'x70', 
60'x130'. Brand new. still cra- 
ted. Will deliver, 1-800-411- 
5869. 



318 



Business 
Office liqulpment 



UPGRADE YOUR HOME 
OFFICE. Computer tablos 
and accoustical privacy pan- 
els, commercial grado. $2,000 
value, tor S200. Sovorol sizos. 
(847) 623-4649. 



320 



Electronics 
Computers 



DESKS, ANTIQUE, SOLID 
oak, 3x5' top area, excellent 
condition. Two to choose from. 
$300/each. (414) 657-1847. 



304 


Appliances 



APARTMENT SIZE WHITE 
GAS STOVE, 20", $100/best. 
(847) 263-1646. 



Grayslake 



cylrts 
Crafts 

Lake County 
Fairgrounds 

Grayslake, Illinois 

Illinois 1 20 & U.S. 45 

10:00 am to 4:00 pm 

SATURDAY & SUNDAY 

November 23 & 24, 1996 

ADMISSION $2.00 

Lake County Promotions, Inc. 

P.O. Box 461, Grayslake, 

IL. 60030 

(847) 223-1433 or 

(847) 356-7499 



324 



Farm Guide 



FOR SALE KAY & STRAW. 

Hay first cutting Alfalfa, 32.50 
per bale. Straw $2.00 per bale. 
Urge Bales, (847) 395-8459, 
(414) 857-6477. 



330 



Garage 
Rummage Sale 



"OFFICE fcuulHMENT" 

286 computer, $200/bosl. 
8088 Computer, $100/bosl. 
Copier $450/bosl. CALL 
GREG (847)816-2663. 

MACINTOSH COMPUTER 
SPECIALIST OFFERS: 
•Networking 
•Data Recovery 
*New & Used Computors 
•Memory Upgrades 
•Hard Disk Drlvos 
•Printers 
Free Initial onsite consultation. 
Call (847) 395-7229. 
COMPUTER 
SERVICES 
Specializing In both the aroas 
of computer and financial 
consulting. The computer 
services provided by POEM 
Include the design and 
installation of local area 
networks, training in most 
major software products, and 
on-site servicing of all 
hardware brands. The 
financial services provided by 
POEM Include bookkeeping 

for small to mid-size 

businesses, lax counseling, 

and personal financial 

counseling. Reasonable 

rates for alt services. 

For more Information please 

call (847) 223-5068 and ask 

to speak with Kevin or Daplei, 

or FAX (847) 223-4742. 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



APARTMENT MOVING 
SALE Clothes and miscella- 
neous items. Saturday No- 
vember 16th, Sunday Novem- 
ber 17th, 10am-4pm. 145 
Devlin, Apartment 108, Ingto- 
slde. (847) 587-7648. 

GARAGE SALE FRIDAY 

11/15, 8am-l0pm. Saturday 
11/16, 8am-4pm. Sunday 
11/17, Bam-2pm. Half his, half 
hers, Ono mile west of 12 off 
134, follow signs. 28584 Val- 
ley, Inrjlosldo. 1987 Ford Wag- 
on, $700. 

HARYAN FARMS GRAYS- 
LAKE, Hugo 3-famlly Dalo, Lit- 
tlo Tykos, vintage Longo- 
borgor, baby Horns, otoctrlc 
dryer, rofrigoralor, oloopor 
sofa, much unique miscollano- 
ous/lumlluro/appllancos/an- 
llquos/clothing. Everything 
must gol Friday-Saturday, 
8:30am-1 :30pm. 802 Deep- 
woods Ct. 

AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIG SALE, and there 
is still things that just did not 
go.... Call us at LAKELAND 
Nowapapors and run it 
under the "FREE or Givea- 
ways" classified column. FREE 
ADS are NO CHARGE! 
(847) 223-8161, ext. 140. 



EASY CHAIR, SOFA and 
Loveseat, Blue, Mauve, 
Cream, $575. LEATHER 
sofa and loveseat, $950. Ex- 
cellent condition, MUST SELLI 
(847)548-1046. 

QUEEN ANNE STYLE bed- 
room, complete $1,100. Din- 
ing room set, $1,700. OAK 
bedroom set $1,200, Oak 
dlnlngroom set $1,980. 
ALSO Sleigh bedroom set, 
$1 ,745. All in PERFECT con- 
'ditlon. MUST SELLI 
(847)548-1045. 

BRASS BED QUEEN size 
Orthopedic set. Never used, 
boxed. New $800, sell for 
$275. (414) 427-0583. 

BRASS QUEEN SIZE BED 
wilh new deluxe mattress, still 
In plastic. $255 including 
frame. Canopy bed unique 
black wrought iron, with new 
deluxe mattress set, $375. De- 
livery available. (847) 
374-9882. 

COMMERCIAL FLOOR 

POLISHING MACHINE, Ad- 
vanced 1100 Whlrlamatlc, 
$450/best. (847) 356-0481. 

DAYBED, WHITE AND 
brass, complete set with mat- 
tress, pop-up trundle and link" 
spring, brand new In box, 
$340. (847) 459-4430, 

DESIGNER MODEL 
HOME CONTENTS 
Sofa/loveseat set, hunter 
green and cranberry, $595, 
Sofa/loveseat set, earth tones, 
$695. Other sets, plaids, 
stripes, florals, leathers, etc. 
Dlnlngroom set, 10-piece, 
$1,595. Bedroom set, 6- 
piece, $995, etc, (847) 329- 
4119. 

DININGROOM SET, DARK 
walnut, table, 2-loafs, 6- 
chalrs, buffet, $600. (847) 
526-8534. 

FACTORY DIRECT 

BUNK BEDS 

SAVE BIG SSS 

Custom Built. 

Choice of colors, 

From $B9.00-$1, 500.00 

(847) 244-6157, 

MOVING SALE AUGUST 
Furniture, queen size sleeper 
couch, fur jackets, designer 
clothes {men. women, child- 
ren), toys, patio furniture and 
more. By appointment. Please 
leave message (847) 

295-9114. 

NEW KING SIZE pillow top 
mattress, extra thick, includes 
frame and brass headboard, 
mattress and box springs, 
$500. (847) 459-5275, 

OAK ROLL TOP DESK, with 
matching leather upholstered 
chair. Excellent condition. 
$600. (847) 838-3148. 

OVERSIZED COUCH AND 
LOVESEAT, excellent condl- 
tlon, S300, (847) 265-9605. 

QUEEN SIZE "PILLOW 

Top" extra thick, includes 
frame and brass -headboard, 
matlross and box springs, 
$400. (847) 459-5275. 

SINGLE BED, NO head- 
board, Comploto with bed- 
spread, blanket, and sheets. 
$100. (847) 587-7648. 

THREE PIECE FIRE- 
PLACE EQUIPMENT, $20. 
Toro Snow Shovel, $25. Twin 
bod frame, $15. Oak book- 
case, 5'hlgh, 3*wide. $35. Pine 
rocker, $25. National Geo- 
graphies, 10c ea. (847) 
949-8689. 

WASHER AND DRYER 
(electric) Kenmore, white, less 
lhan 3yrs. old. (414) 
859-3041, __ 

WATERBED MATTRESS 
TOP of the line, king size, less 
than 2yrs. old, $150. (414) 
697-8716. 



334 


Good Things To Eal 


EIGHT GREAT HOLIDAY 
DESSERTS. Send $4.00 & 
S.A.S.E. to: LB., P. O. Box 894, 
Lake Villa, III. 60046. 


338 


; Horses & Tacks 



SHAVINGS 

Hay, straw, feed. 

WE DELIVER! 

(414) 857-2525. 

M-F 8-5 

Sat. 8-3. 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



349 



Clothes 



1954 ZENITH AM/FM 

STEREO with manual record 
player, maple finish, great 
shape, needs record needle, 
Jazz records Included, 
$70/best. (847) 729-7601. 



FOR SALE 1995 DIA- 
MOND COLLECTION, bri- 
dal dress, size 16. While, 
cathedrat length train, off Iho 
shoulder dress. Long sleeves, 
beautiful with sequins and 
pearls. Brand new headpiece 
and veil. Paid $2,000, first 
$500 takes all. Call Melodl 
(414) 889-4967. 

MINK CAPE, NEARLY new, 
$300/best. (847)473-3551. 

TWO RACOON COATS, 
size 12, 1 -short |acket, 1-long 
coat. $200 for both/best. (847) 
543-1224. 



350 


Miscellaneous 



21 '6* LONG ARCHED 
STEEL BRIDGE, 4'6" wide. 
Heavy duty and nice railings 
attached on bolh sides. $900. 
(414)857-3211. ■ 

VENDING MACHINES 11 
TABLETOPS. Three in loca- 
tions, other locations avail- 
able. Brand new condition. 
$4,400/best. (414) 857-7918 
leave message. 

FREE COLOR 
BROCHURE Children's 
dresses, size newborn to girl 
16. Handcrafted by Ud'l Dollys" 
Dressmakers. Pigeon Forge, 
TN. 1-800-983-6559. 

LIFT MASTER 1/3HP GA- 
RAGE DOOR OPENER, 
S100/bost. (847) 263-1646. 

OLD BEER SIGN "Cham- 
pagne of Bottled beer", Miller 
High Life, electric, best offer. 
(414) 694-3067. 

ONLY 38 DAYS LEFT 
TILL CHRISTMAS. 7-1/2' 
Genuine ..Mountain King (as 
seen on TV) Christmas tree, 8- 
branches and top, each with 
Its own set of blinking lights, 
skirt and extra tights. $75 
cash. (847) 526-8992 Wau- 
conda area. 

LIFESTYLER EXERCISE 
BIKE, digital timer, $150. 
(414) 857-7918 leave mes- 
sage 

TORO SNOW THROWER, 
$65. DP Air Slrider, dual action 
walker, stepper, Jogger, $95. 
(847) 587-1737 after 6pm. 

TWO BULLS TICKETS 7- 
rows from the floor, free pass 
to the looker room bar, dining 
for two with reservations. Chi- 
cago v Miami, December 7, 
1996. Tickets start at $150. 
Best offer, (847)838-1013. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 
TAN AT HOME, Buy DIRECT 
and SAVEI Commercial/home 
units from $199. Low monlhly 
payments. FREE color cata- 
log. Call today 1-800-842- 
1305. 



nm iii nniuinm ii nni i um 



INSTANT SERVICE 

High quality products at i 
treasonable prices -|| 
{shipped, Insured and 
i wrapped with guaranteed 
■ delivery for Christmas day. 

i 1-888-643-7411 
Ext. 222 

i toll free (or free catalog 

Hurry! 

1st 100 callers \ 
get free gift! 

TumtH i i i timimmtttittm m 



354 



Medical Equip 
Supplies 



LIBERTY ELECTRIC 

CHAIR LIFT, 15ft., left hand 

stair mount, $1,200. (414) 
248-2700. 



360 



Pets & Supplies 



V 



AKC BOXER PUPPIES, 
BWKS. old. Parents on prem- 
iSBS. (847) 740-4942. 

COCKER SPANIEL PUPS, 
AKC, home raised, parents in 
home, born 10/5, excellent 
temperament, vet certified, 
will hold. $375. (847) 
623-0879. 

DO YOU ENJOY working 
wilh animals? Do you have 2 
hours per week to spare? Assi- 
st Animal Foundation, one of 
the area's no-kill shelters is 
seeking volunteers for work 
that is highly rewarding and 
funl We need men and 
women who: can work with 
cats and dogs, do light repair 
work and can answer phones 
and other office duties. We are 
located in Crystal Lake. For 
more Information please call 
(815)459-0990. 

DOG BOARDING 

Vacation in. your schedule? 

I can watch your dog/pup in 

my home. 

Lots of affection tor your 

"Companion". 

Fenced yard. 

Excellent references 

available. Call or leave 

message for Florence. 

(847) 966-6319. 

GERMAN SHEPHERD 

PUPS top quality, Import 
sired, work or show. Hips and 
health guaranteed. $500- 
$750. (847) 746-1924. 

HAND FED COCKATIELS." 

Buy cage and supplies, get 
birds at 1/2 price. Parrots avail- 
able also. (414) 859-0444. 



a 

HED 

vide, 
lings 
1900. 




NOT^^m^^^m m^i^ii^ < 



360 



PeU& Supplies 



500 


Homes For Sale 



11 

loca- 
ivall- 
tlon. 
7918 

LOR 

en's 
» girl 
ollys 
Jrge, 

GA- 
1ER, 

i. 

•am- 
filler 
)ffer. 

EFT 

•1/2' 

(as 

e t 8- 

with 

ghts, 

$75 

Vau- 



;ise 

150. 
Ties- 



/ER, 
ctlon 

$95, 



S 7- 

pass 
inlng 
Chl- 
n 7, 
!150, 
h_ 

;DS. 

ECT 
ome 
nthly 

:a(a- 
B42- 



at 

ind 
sed 
lay. 

1 



re 

5~] 

TRIC 
hand 
(414) 



PIES, 

prem- 

S UPS, 

;nls in 

:ellent 

rtifled, 

(847) 

orking 

lavo 2 

? Assl- 

Dne of 

ors Is 

work 

g and 

i and 

k with 

repair 

ihones 

Weare 

e. For 

:e call 



LQUARIUM COMBO 
UlES: 22's $39; 35's $65; 
Irj's $89; 55's $99.96; 70's 
|149; 80'S $189; 125'S $2991 
Iquatic World (414) 
(67-7339. 

^ABY HAND FED PAR- 
10TS, orange winged Ama- 

Dn, Maximillian Pionus and 

ages. (414) 697-1804. 

JOSTON TERRIER, AKC, 

Jlck of the liter, mala, 6/weaks. 
347)662-1856. 

1APPY JACK TRIVERMI- 
;iDE: Rcognlzed safe & ef- 
fect ivo agatnstjpok, round, & 
apeworms fiu-dogs & cats, 
Available 0-TfC"'at FARM, 
-EED, & HARDWARE 
STORES. 

tEPTILE TANK FOR 
SALE. With heater pad and 
Screened top. $60. Call Diane 
{847 )587-1737. 

.LHASO/YORKIE MIX, 
30 RN 10/3, great with kids. 
3all for more information 
J847 ) 934-3887. 

HAKE THIS HOLIDAY 
iOLDENI Golden Ratrlever 
J ups. Pure bred, AKC, dew- 
;lawed, 1st. shots, 6/weeks 
jld. Females $325. Males 
300. (414)534-3127. 

*IT BULL PUPPIES, out- 
standing largo boned, reds, 
Macks, $600/and up. (815) 
5553-5836. 

PUREBRED MALE CHI- 
HUAHUA at stud. Beautiful 
muscular fawn, 1-1/2yr. old, 
5lbs. Looking for female object 
■ pick of the litter. (847) 395- 
0490. . 

ROTTWEILER PUPS, 2- 
FEMALES, 13/weeks old, 
$450/best. (414) 632-6543, 

SIX MONTH MALE DOBER- 
MAN , with papers, black & 
rust, pet must go because of 
Illness. 5200/bQSt. (847) 
587-0318. 

tank, 55 GALLON, comes 
W| lh lid, heat rock and moro. 
$100. Large dog cage, $50. 

(414) 6S4-1081. 



370 



.Wanted To Buy 



Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
IParts. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coko Machines, 
Paying CASHI Call 
(630)985-2742. 

WANTED TO BUY Old Slot 
Cars and Track (noHO), Erec- 
tor Sets, and Lionel Trains. 
Top dollar paidl Call (815) 
236-2877 and leave mes- 
sage. 

WANTED USED WORLD 
BOOK ENCYCLOPEDIAS, 

In good condition, dated 1980 
or newer. (847) 249-5894. 

WANTED: OLDER AMERI- 
CAN GUITARS 1900-1960'S. 

Gibson, Fender, Martin, Na- 
tional, Grelsch. Also Gibson 
Mandolins. Leave message, if 
not in. Cash paid. 1-800-790- 
7987. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



ATTENTION CAR BUFFS, 

Round Lake Beach, large 
34'x26' heated workshop/ga- 
rago Is excellent. Includes a 2- 
bedroom home, fireplace and 
central air. A great starter 
home. $89,000. (847) 
223-1544. 

CAN'T AFFORD THE 
HOME YOU NEED? Own a 
homo now, wilhout the down- 
payment banks require. 100% 
permanent financing if quali- 
fied. DeGeorge Home Al- 
liance. 1-800-343-2880. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER 

1216 William Dr., Lake Zurich, 
4/5 bedrooms, study, 2,1 
baths, 2 story contemporary, 
open floor plan, .neulral decor, 
finished basement, fenced 
premium lot with deck, profes- 
sional landscaping,, desirable 
Hunters Creek and schools, 
below market pricing, reduced 
to $275,900, Open House 
Sunday November 17th & 
24th. 1pm-5pm. (847) 
550-0312. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH, 
WILLOW RIDGE SUBDIVI- 
SION Immaculate newer 
quad-level, in quiet neighbor- 
hood, 3-bedrooms, 2-1/2 
baths, vaulted ceilings, tire- 
place, C/A, first floor laundry, 
appliances, basement, at- 
tached 2-car garage, on large 
corner lot. Available Imme- 
diately. NO BROKERSI 
$139,500.(815)337-3448. 



K 7 



OPEN HOUSE 

November 16th. 
(Saturday) 
12pm-2pm 
7524 24th Ave. 
Kenosha, Wl 
Brick Cape Cod- 
Plaster walls, hard wood 
floors, format dining, 2 bad- 
rooms, new balh, roc room & 
bath down. Now furnace. 
Reduced 15,000 Now $104,900 

Bear Realty 

Paula Thomas 
(*14) 558-S4S1 

(Pager) 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 



GRAYSLAKE NEWER 2- 
STORY, '3-bBdroom home, 
2.1 baths, full basement, 2-car 
garage, C/A. By Owner 
$182,500. (847) 548-7735. 

INTEREST BREAK HOME 

owners use equity to pay off 
high Interest obligations. Bet- 
ter than paying high rates on 
credit cards or other bills and 
get the tax benefit. Jim Davis 
(BOO) 747-5547 Servicing II. a 

Wi. 

WATERFRONT HOME 

LINDENHURST 100FT. 

FRONTAGE, on 1/3 acre, 
newly remodeled, 4-bed- 
rooms, top of the line kitchen, 
full walk-out basement, 
minutes to Gurnes Mills, 
move-In condition. Priced to 
sell quickly. By owner 

5225,000.(414)279-5041. 

LOOKING FOR A TAX DE- 
DUCTION IN 199B? The 
best one may be your own 
home. We service li, & Wi. You 
may qualify for as little as 3% 
down. Jim Davis (800) 747- 
5547. 

MOVE IN BY CHRISTMAS) 

3yr. new, 3-bedrooms, 1-1/2 
baths, 2-story, full basement, 
2-car garage, vaulted ceilings. 
Round Lake Park. Must sell, 
relocating. $131,900. Pager 
(847) 992-3985. 

LINDENHURST, RENT TO 
BUY, only $2,000 down, buys 
beautiful 2-story, 4-bedroom, 
2-1/2 bath, famllyroom, dining- 
room, fireplace, 2-car garage, 
and basement. $1,450/month. 
(847) 223-6269. 

NORTHERN WISCONSIN 
5-ACRE farmette outside of 
Rice Lake, Wise. Large 3-bed- 
room Mobile Home and sturdy 
old barn. Both In good shape. 
Tall pines and pond on proper- 
ty. Currently renting for 
$425/month. New carpet, 
plumbing, and kitchen stove. 
All appliances and furniture In- 
cluded. Beautiful view of the 
Blue Hills. $39,000. (414) 

279-9879. 

OPEN HOUSE, SATUR- 
DAY 11/te, Sunday 11/17, 
10am-3pm, 2405 Deerpalh 
Dr., Undenhurst. Large trl-lev- 
el, 4- bedrooms, 3-baths, plus 
much more. Grayslake High 
School, Lake Villa Elementary 
District, $151,500. (847) 
356-7834. 

RENT TO OWN ROUND 
LAKE spacious 3-bedroom, 
2-bath, has all upgrades in- 
cluding huge kitchen, with cus- 
tom cabinets, sunroom, fin- 
ished walk-out basement with 
office, 2-car, fenced yard, 
great neighborhood, 

S995/month. (847) 438-1 Qt 2. 

SAVE 6% REAL Estate com- 
mission, buy direct from own- 
er. 1-home, immediate occu- 
pancy. 1 to be completed. Sell- 
ing for below appraised value, 
Gorgeous view of golf course, 
ponds and mature trees. 
Great location, walking dis- 
tance to shopping with side 
walks and curbs. Tandem En- 
terprlses (414) 877-9750. 

SELL A HOME/BUY A 

HOME. If selling, wo have a 
number of interested buyers. If 
Interested in purchasing you 
may qualify for as little as 3% 
down. Servicing II. & Wi. Jim 
Davis. (BOO) 747-5547. 

SPRING GROVE 2-BED- 
ROOM, 1-bath cedar ranch. 
20x20 livingroom overlooking 
Nippersink Creek, 20x17 kitch- 
en, 16x14 master bedroom, 
laundryroom, deck, C/A. 
Chain access with pier, 
$119,900. No Realtors. (847) 
5B7-3430. 

TAX BREAK RENTING 

doesn't do it so why not get out 
of an apartment Into your own 
home? You may qualify for as 
litlle as 3% down. Servicing II. 
& Wi. Jim Davis (800) 747- 
5547. 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 29208 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 

FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 

EASTERN DIVISION 

Home Savings of America FSB, Plaintiff, VS. Joyce Cvijovic, 

Kevin McDonogh and Aleksandar Cvijovic, Defendants. Case No 

96 C 2483. Judge Marovtch 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 29208 . (IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED 

PARTIES CONSULTTHEIR OWN A TTORNEYS BEFORE 

BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 

entered in the above entitled cause on July 25. 1996. 

I, Max Tyson, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
December 19, 1996 at the hour of 9:00 a.m. at the front door ol 
Lake County Ct. House-Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bid- 
der for cash, the following described premises: 
c/k/a 117 Green Bay Rd, Highland Park, IL 60035 
Tax ID# 16-36-406-021 

The Improvements on the properly consist of single family 
dwelling. 

Sate Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sate shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 
The Judgment amount was $238,365,22. 
Upon the sate being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale-whlch will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 
For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer Is do! required to provide additional information other than 
that set forth In this Notice, 



FISHER AND FISHER RLE NO. 29140 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 
EASTERN DIVISION 
Home Savings of America, FSB, Plaintiff, VS. Hee K. Park and 
Jee H.Yang, Soon H. Park, James Park and Foster Bank, 
Defendants. Case No. 96 C 2244. Judge Gettleman. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 29140 . (IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED 

PARTIES CONSULTTHEIR QWJL ATTORNEYS BEFORE 

BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 

entered in the above entitled cause on July 24. 1996. 

We, Thomas Johnson and Tina Douglas, Special 
Commissioner for this court will on December 18, 1996 at the 
hour of 1 :30 p.m. at the front doo r of Lake County Courthouse, 1 8 
N. County st., Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for 
cash, the following described premises: , 

c/k/a 598 Yardley Trail, Mundelein, IL 60060. Tax ID# 10-35-206-! 
007,The Improvements on the property consist of a single family 
dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The shall shall be subject to 
gonerai toxoa and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 

The Judgment amount was $221 ,967.45. 

Upon the sals being made the purchaser will receive a 

Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 

specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 

Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312)372- 

4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 

Officer is qoJ required to provide additional information other than 

that set forth in this Notice. 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 28850 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 

First Indiana Bank, FSB, Plaintiff, VS. Jeffrey A. Batio, Stephen 

G. Hearn and Stanley Hearn; Defendants. Case No. 96 C 1081, 

Judge C onion. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE OUR FILE 

NO. 28850 . flT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES 

CONSULTTHEIR CWJ1ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT 

FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered in the above entitled cause on Jung 27. 199 6, 

I, Michael Polelle, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
November 29, 1996 at the hour of 2:00 p.m. at the front door of 
Lake County Courthouse, 18 N. County Street, Waukegan, 
Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described 
premises: 

c/k/a 1437 St. Johns Ave., Highland Park, IL 60035 

Tax ID #16-27-207-014 

The Improvements on the property consist of a single family 
dwelling, 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall ba subject to 
general taxes and to special assessmenls. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 

The judgement amount was $83,327.65. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 

For information call the Sales Officer as Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer is Dfll required to provide additional Information other ihan 
that set forth In this Notice. 



AFFORDABLE, 

REMODELED 

RANCH... 

]2 Bedrooms on a wood- 
jed lot with new carpet' 
jkitchen, roof. Furnace & ( 
Jcentral air. Gas fire- 
Jplace & built-in shelves' 
jin living room, concreter, 
ipatio & new appliances? 
'including laundry. Extra]! 
jlot available. 

$89,900! 

Michael Lescher 

(847)395-3000 

IRE/MAX Advantage; 

'Your link to the chain" \ 



rf 



I 



OPEN HOUSE 

Saturday, Nov. 16th 
2:15pm - 4pm 

918 Washington Rd. 
Kenosha, WI 

Charming brick Cape Cod w/3 
or 4 bedrooms. Remodeled 
throughout New 2.5 garage, 
Berber carpets. New electric 
service. Asking $89,900. 

Bear Realty 

Paula Thomas 
(414) 558-5451 

(Pager) 



ZZZZZXXXXXXZXIXZ 

I ISLAND LAKE 1 

1 WHY RENT? 1 

I x 

I Own Single Family J 
xHome for less thanz 
xRent. 2 large bed-x 
| rooms, living room,| 
z dining room, base-z 
xment, 1 car att.x 
| garage, fenced yard| 
x& so much more. 

| $104,900| 

x x 

'I Call Erica today for | 
x more information: | 



Island Lake 

3 Bedrooms, 2 

bath, 2 car 
garage, f/p, a/c, 

Open House 
Sun. 11-1, 

$134,900 

$7,000 under market!] 

Call owner at 

(815) 338-25791 




On TrIE 

MarIcet 



iWlu JUXdenAtu&t 
Stanch 

Three bedroom, maintenance 
tree home, wi ih dining room. 
Newer balhroorn, kitchen, sid- 
ing, furnace, C/A and more. Dig 
fenced yard. Great area. 
Only $117,500 

Call Beverly 

Century 21 Alpha Omega 

(708) 233-2725 



BEAUTIFUL BRICK 
HILLSIDE RANCH 

On J/4 Acres in Beach Park- 
Too many ammcnJlics to liii ! 

$198,000 
Call Ann Tyra 

for showing 

CENTURY 21 KNOX 

847-374-9525 



Beach Park 



1 



{ Executive Home f 
w/ In Law 



Arrangement! 



§ Breath-Taking 
1 1 .7 Acres, 



winding! 
ravine, heavily 



i creek, 
| treed. 

$4 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 
I fireplaces, new furnace, 
* central air, hardwood i 
| floors, sun porch ta 

|Full bascmcnt-3 car* 
1 garage g 

% One bedroom loft J; 
£ rental over garage-was | 

!\ recently updated 
;Asking-$2 19,900 | 

| CORNERSTONE | 
REALTY 



I (847) 577-19901 f ASK 4 BRENDA f 



xSEffiCK&COJ 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 



847-872-1515 
847-872-8998 



504 


Homes For Rent 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



WAUKEGAN VICTORIAN 
SETTING 1 -bedroom apart- 
ments, $450 and up. (847) 
336-0144. : 

WINTHROP HARBOR 3- 
BEDROOM home with ga- 
rage, $695/month plus securi- 
ty deposit. Newly remodeled. 
No pets. (647) 746-S747. 

2ION 2-BEDROOM 

RANCH, newly painted and 
decoraled, off street parking, 
no pets and no Section 8 , se- 
curity and references. (847) 
872-4086. 



FURNISHED NICELY 2- 
BEDROOM cottage, no pets. 
1-car parking, $495/month 
plus utilities, references and 
security deposit, 6/month 
lease. (847) 587-5193. 

LAKEFRONT 2-STORY 
HOUSE, 4-bedrooms, 2- 
baths, heat, appliances, car- 
pet and minl-bllnds, 
S850/month plus $1,000 se- 
curity deposit. (847) 
395-5045, 

• SMALL COTTAGE FOR 
RENT. A 1 -person dwelling. 
No pels and non-smoker. 
S550/month, plus security de- 
posit. Includes all utilities. 
Available November- 1, 1996. 
(847) 223-0729 leave mes- 
sago. 

WAUCONOA IN TOWN 
ADULT COMMUNITY, 2- 
BEDROOM, 1-bath, 

3695/monln plus utilities, 
(847) 526-5000. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN, 1- 
bedroom, 1-bath, 

$575/month. No pets. (847) 
526-5000. 



■What's New 



508 


Homes Wanted 



THREE BEDROOM 

HOUSE NEEDED IMME- 
DIATELY!! Section 8 ap- 
proved. Call after 2pm. (847) 
.546-5842. 



514 



Condo/Town Homes 



LAKE VIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS. Large 1+2- 
bedroom apartments. Lake Vil- 
la. $575 and S700/month. 
Heat water, air Included, 
(847)356-5474.- 

NEWLY REMODELED '1- 
BEDROOM APARTMENT 
IN ROUND LAKE BEACH. 
SENIORS WELCOME. All 
utilities included except elec- 
tric. $510/month. Pager (847) 
210-9508. (847) 623-8869. 

VACATION VILLAGE STU- 
DIO CONDO, pool, tennis, ac- 
cess to Chain, 24hrs. security, 
$450/month possible option. 
(847) 546-7777. 

WAUCONDA MAIN- 

TENANCE PERSON to rent 
1 or 2 bedroom apartment, 
close to downtown, (847) 465- 
9718 PAUL J. QUETSCHKE & 
CO. 



FOR RENT AVAILABLE 
IMMEDIATELY. In Antioch 
spacious 2-bedroom town- 
house with large closets, 1-1/2 
baths, appliances, C/A, laun- 
dryroom in basement with 
washer and gas dryer hook- 
up, plus 2-car garage with 
opener. Close to schools and 
shopping. $925/month, first 
and last months rent plus se- 
curity deposit. No pets. Refer- 
ences needed. (847) 356- 
2417 leave message. 

FOX LAKE WATERFRONT 
CONDO, 2-bedrooms, 2-full 
baths, close to town and train 
station. Security deposit re- 
quired. Available immediately. 
No pets. S725/month. (847) 
587-3193. 

TWO BEDROOM CONDO 
IN FOX LAKE FOR HENT, 

24hr. security, no pets. Avail- 
able 12/1. Call after 4pm (847) 
356-1132. 



518 


Mobile Homes 



*DOU- 
*SIN- 



MODULARS 
BLEWIDES 
GLEWIDES TWO STORY 
MODULAR ON DISPLAY1 
FOUNDATIONS 'BASE- 
MENTS 'GARAGES *WELLS 
•SEPTIC. WE DO IT ALLI 
FREE STATEWIDE DELIV- 
ERY/SET. RILEY MANUFAC- 
TURED HOMES 1-800-790- 
1541. 

RAINBOW LAKE MANOR 

double wide, 3-bedroom, 1- 
1/2 baths, all appliances, on 
large corner lot, work- 
shop/shed with electricity, 
many extras. $36,500. (414) 
857-9536 after 5pm. 



520 



Apartments For Rent 



■ ? i wGfu Q m mn mm 



GRAYSLAKE 2-BED- 

ROOM APARTMENT, off 
street parking, great location. 
$650/month plus utilities. 
Available now. (847) 
205-1684. 

GURNEE 3-BEDROOM, 

GREAT location, C/A, en- 
closed porch, deck, wash- 
er/dryer hook-up. No pets. Se- 
curity and references re- 
quired. S795/monlh, (847) 
244-6199 weekday s only. 

IMPERIAL TOWER & 
IMPERIAL MANOR 
QUIET BUILDINGS 
LARGE SPACIOUS 

APARTMENTS 

AIR CONDITIONING 

PRIVATE BALCONIES 

LARGE CLOSETS 

PRIVACY WALLS 

CONVENIENT LAUNDRY 

FACILITIES. 

CALL (B47) 244-9222. 

ISLAND LAKE SMALL 1- 

bedroom apartment, all utili- 
ties included. $425/monlh, se- 
curity deposit required. (847) 
526-5755. 

LAKE ZURICH, 1-BED- 
ROOM, laundry. No pets. 
Heat included. Available now. 
S60Q/month plus security. 
(847)438-0886.' ■ ' ' 



r 



FOR SALE 16X80 MOBILE 
HOME tn Rainbow Lake 
Manor. Uved-ln 1yr. Moving 
out of state. 2-bedrooms, 1- 
1/2 baths, fully carpeted, all 
appliances, deck and shed. 
Priced to sell. (414) B57-2691. 

MOBILE HOME 2-BED- 
ROOMS, asking $11,500. 
Must sell. (414)697-9368. 

MOBILE HOME GREAT 

buy must sell quickly, 14x70, 
2-bedrooms, 2-baths, com- 
pletely remodeled, new carpet 
(hroughoput, all appliances in- 
cluding washer/dryer, C/A. at- 
tached deck, covered carport, 
shed, on good lot, appraised 
at $15,000. Priced tor quick 
sate $8,000/negotiable. (847) 
546-2673. 



APARTMENT 
FOR RENT 

2 bedroom, 2 car 
garage apartment In 

Round Lake. 
Call (847) 546-0818 






Calling All Military 
Personnel 

You are to report imme- 
diately to Waterford 
Place for a great deal 
on 1 bedroom apart- 
ments! Call todayl 

(847) 746-2211 



TIRED OF 
RENTING? 

A home Is in your reach 
with as little as 3% down 
for qualified buyers. 

Servicing IL 4WI. Jim 1 

Davis. 

(800) 747-5547 



VWWrtWrtVW 



STATIONSIDE 
VILLAGE 

5215 UTH AVENUE 
KEN0S1IA,WI 

Luxurious Living 

Apartments & Townhouscs 

1 bedroom - 2 baths 

Mini Blinds 

Appliances 

Garages Available 

Elevators No Pets 

Call (414) 656-1010 



WOTM) 

VttUGE 
APAMWrS 

2200 Lewis Arc.. Zion 

1&2 BEDROOMS 

FREEHEAJ 

Appliances • Ctiaom Blinds 
Oo-5fteMirager«NoPas 

Sbrti^liron #95*10. 
Call Martha & Isaac 

(Ml) 746-1420 
or Bear Property 
Manai' 
(414)1 



Call 
223-8161 



J 



DEEPLAKE 
HERMITAGE 

SPACIOUS 1 
BEDROOM surras 

• Free gas heat, 
cooking & water 

• Air conditioner in 
each unit 

• WalMc-wall carpeting 

• Ample closet space 

• Appliances included 

• Tennis & basketball 
courts 

• Laundry facilities in 
building 

$545 

149 N. Milwaukee 
Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2002 






. ' 



h 



H 




■ - . - ■ j- 






■■ ■•■ 




CLASSIFIED UkElANd'NEwspApWNtive^iljiR 15; : 199'6-' 



520 



Apaitmcals For Rent ! 



520 



Apartments For Rcni 



^ Water's Edge 
Apartments 

• FREE Gas Heat, Cooking & Water 

• Spaciously Designed Apartments 

• Fully Equipped Picture Window Kitchens 

250 S. Rt. 59 • Fox Lake/lngleside 



mr, 



ONE BEDROOM 
APARTMENTS 

Only 3 Left To Choose From! 

• Flexible Leasing 
•Convenient to Metra 



Call about our 
Fall special... 



Credit 
i£heci 




ANTIOCH 
MANOR 



A P A U T M liNTS 



Be One Of The Lucky Ones!!! 

847-395-0949 

HWY.83& 
North Ave. 






4 

what 



At WAUL© 

itisse^SrW 

some people are 
paying for rent! 
Give us a call and 
you will find that 
you don't have to 
be haunted to have 
an apartment. No 
tricks.. .just treats! 
Call today 



ATTENTION 

If you have placed classified 
advertising with the Lake 
land Newspapers you may re 
eelve a misleading statement 
tjam another firm request- 
ing payment for this advertis- 
ing. To receive proper cred- 
it to your account, all pay- 
ments Tor your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

PO Box 208 

30 8. Whitney Bt. 

Qrayslake. IL 60030-0268 



PET OF THE WEEK 
SPONSORED BY: 

Dr. M.H. Dahler 
. Beach Park Animal Hospital 
27063 N. Sheridan Rd!. Beach Park.IL , 
(847)244-1230 

Dr. Dave Trask 
2595 E. Grand Ave., Lindenhurst.lL 
(847) 356 : 1516 
Wal-Mart Pet Dept. 
772 E. Rollins Rd.. Round Lake Beach, IL 
(847) 546-0043"~;~ 
Drs. Craig & Simms 
Animas Veterinary Clinic . 
.320 E: Neville Dr. 
;• Grayslake, IL 
. (847)223-5593 



PET OF THE WEEK 

There's 

no 
place 

like 
home 

& Although kitten season normally ends 
^Orphans of the Storm still has a lovely 
jsadorable kittens, from eight weeks of age 
^available for adoption. The selection Includes w» 
Sseml-long hair as well as short hair kittens in various col- » 
jgors and patterns. These kittens are well socialized,^ 
^affectionate, full of playful "cat"-sonality, and eager to gofe 
» to a loving home and family, where they will thrive andwj 

{SJgrOW ' n ' n *^ fi hoanlKnl aHllll note then/ ara rfaetlnnrt tnS 




ecome 



Into the beautiful adult cats they are destined tog 
ne. If you are looking for a darling kitten, or a pair#j 



i the Storm also has an outstanding selection^ 
gorgeous adult cats that are in desperate need for^ 
homes. So whether you'd like to adopt an 
kitten, Orphans can meet your needs. 



9d for^ 
adult, p 

collar. S 




» urpnans or ins oiurm is locaieo at zzuu nrverwooasN 
SRd., Deerfield. Hours are 11 am - 5 pm, seven days a^ 
»week.. Call. (847) 945-0235. for further information. S 



530 



Rooms For Rent 



FURNISHED SLEEPING 
ROOMS. Mundeleln area. 
Male/female. No pets. 
390/per week. References. 
(847) 566-2885. 

ROOM FOR RENT IN 
SPRING GROVE Share 
sharp new house. Males 23- 
30 years seeking same to 
share 4-bedroom, 3-balh, on 
wooded lot. Close to Rts. 1 2 & 
173. Private phone, laundry 
and cable. S385/month. (630) 
665-4484. 



530 


Rooms For Rent 



534 



Business Property 
For Sale 



ROUND LAKE AREA- 
ROOM FOR RENT with 
kitchen privileges, 

$310/month, utilities Included. 
No drugs or alcohol. Rose 
(847)740-0813. ' 



Call 
223-8161 



HOUSTON, TX 

Convenience Corner Store 
sale or partnership. 2B yrs. 
Good toe. & future potential. 
342 unit apt. bldg. to be open- 
ing across st. 

7I3-760-08Q© 
Abu Faheem 




REALTORS 
WE KNOW WHO YOU ARE. 

jAnd we know your cutomers will too, when 
[Lakeland introduces the "Who's Who in Real 
>Estate" 

►Starting soon, we will be running a special section* 
'for all Realtors. The section includes your busi-' 
>ness card (with your photo of course) in all 13< 
[Lakeland Newspapers. 

[The cost for this service is as follows: 

'One week 2x2 space $50.00/week 

[One month 2x2 space $150.00 

|Two months 2x2 space $275.00 iin^^rc^r^*] 

.Feature Box 2x6 space 100.00/week 

This section was created with your advertising needs \ 
in mind. With the rapid growth in our market area/ 
our readership has grown in leaps and bounds. As a< 
result, our classified advertising is the most widelyj 
read and distributed in the Lake County and Great < 
Lakes area. 

JPut our forty years of publishing experience and rep-i 

►utation to work for you. Please contact our expend 

>enced accounts' managers for further information or, 

to register at 

(847)223-8161 

extensions 110, 111, Or 112. 

Please note* Limitations may apply due to space availability. 



?ffif% 



JSar- 




^Landmark 
Designs 








kS3H^cT 



FOXRIDGE SBaawfc* 

The Foxridge b a wonderfully unique design allowing for maximum utilization of Inferior space and com- 
pelling exterior. Designed for a slightly sloping lot, the Foxridge would fit equally In the city or country. The 
central Irving area allows for the striking contrast of ongled vertical lines with the more linear horizontal lines 
of the side wings. 

The walk-through kitchen has been thoughtfully arranged with the eating bar in the main kitchen and 
the dining room to the right This configuration permits the cook In the house to serve a multi-course meal 
or quick snack with ease. Kitchen features include an Island cooktop, double ovens and a lazy Susan. 

The right wing contains an office with full bath. Amenltlos Include wash basin, linen storage and clothes 
hamper. On the lower level Is an exercise room, with Its own half bath. 

The Irving area is Impressive and features extensive windows allowing for a truly panoramic view and 
taking lull advantage of natural light. The generous utility room Is also centrally located for convenience, 

The huge master suite Is designed to pamper Its owners. The fireplace adds warmth to this room for 
those cold winter nights. A bathroom the size of a small bedroom Is tilled with natural light from several 
skylights. The spa room can be entered through the master suite bathroom or from the patio. 

Designed to compliment Its environment, the Foxridge offers the opportunity for stylish and spacious 
living In a home Intended to make the most of available space. 

For a study kit of the FOXRIDGE (402-08), send $10.00, to Landmark Designs, P.O. BOX 2307-LP60, 
Eugene, OR 97402 (Be sure to specify plan name & number). For a collection of plan books featuring pgr 
most popular home plans, send $20 to Landmark, or call 1-800-562-1151. 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



FOR RENT 2000SQ.FT. of 
office or retail space on Rt. 1 2 
& Old 120 in Volo. 
$1,000/month plus your own 
utilities, Ask for Pete or 
Michelle (815) 344-5008. 

GRAYSLAKE 2-SEPER- 
ATE SHOPS tor rent, (1) 
1200sq.fi., (1) 900sq.ft. Please 
call for Information (847) 
223-5353. _^ 

ROUND LAKE BEACH- 
ROLLINS RD. 7500sq,ft. vac- 
ant lot zoned C-3. Ideal for car 
lot or lawn and garden equip- 
ment. Call Bob (847) 
381-6966. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH- 
ROLLINS ROAD. 2900sq.fi. 
A/C/heal/offices. Ideal contrac- 
tor, distributor, repair shop or 
storage. $875. Call Bob (647) 
381-6966. 



BUSINESS 



INDUSTRIAL SPACE 



| 

| FOUNTAIN HEAD | 

I CORPORATE CENTER I 



On Rt 12 in RICHMOND jj 
Superior 2,650 sq. ft. and \ 
5,100 sq.ft. unit. 
Overhead door/dock. 
A/C Office. $995-$1,990. ! 
LAND MANAGEMENT | 

3 

3 



| 815-678-4771 



560 



Vacant Lot/Acreage 



FIRST TIME ADVER- 
TISED fully improved 
10,500sq.lt. (70'x150') mln. 
Vacant single family bulldable 
lots, immediately available on 
Avllon Avenue In Round Lake, 
Illinois. (7) Seven lots remain- 
ing In Falcon Woods II Unit II 
Subdivision. Perfect for small 
builders and spec houses. 
S25.000 non wooded lots. 
327,000 wooded lots. (Will ne- 
gotiate only on (5) lot package 
and closing' by December 
15lh, 1996). No Realtors, Con- 
tact David Peregrin (847) 
740-1103. 



564 



Resort/Vacaiion 
Rentals 



FT. MYERS BEACH, fur- 
nished 2-bedroom mobile 
home, waterfront, with boat 
dock, deck, and Lanal, C/A, 
heat, telephone and cable In- 
cluded. $400/week (minimum 
2/weeks), or $1,100/month. 
November, December, Janu- 
ary. (941)4630283. 

TIMESHARES/CAMP- 
GROUND MEMBER- 

SHIPS/RESALES Buying * 
Selling * Renting, America's 
most successful resort resale 
clearinghouse. Accepting all 
resorts. Call Resort Property 
Resale International Toll Free 
Hotline 1-800-423-5967. 



568 



Out Of Area Property 



CENTRAL WISCONSIN 
RUSTIC RIVERFRONT 
RETREAT. Enjoy the holiday 
at your own waterfront cabin. 
Ready for move in, this offers 
you all recreational amenities. 
Over 3 ac & 254' of frtg, 
$83,950. HUNTING 
ACREAGE Adams Co, Area 
property. Parcels range from 
2-1/2 ac to 40+ ac. Call now 
for a price list or lo view the 
property. LAKE PETENWELL 
A rare offering! Excellent west- 
ern exposure offers magnifi- 
cent sunset views. Only a few 
to choose from. Starting at 
$42,950. Four Seasons Realty 
800-335-2420, 

FIRST TIME OFFEHEDI 
SO. COLORADO RANCH. 
55 acres-$36,900. Mix of 
beautiful woods & rolling fields 
w/spectacular bluffs & Rocky 
Mountain views. Outstanding 
wildlife & recreation. Year 
round access w/telephone & 
eleclrlc. Excellent financing. 
Call now 719-864-6367. Red 
Creek, 

GRAND OPENING OF 

PHASE III - our Final Phase. 
Spectacular lakefront sale on 
50,000 acre recreational lake 
In SO Phases 1 & 2 - 130 lots 
sold In under 12 months! Don't 
miss out! Call Immediately 
800-704-3154, 

IDAHO LAND SALE! 36 AC - 

$29,900 Salmon River Coun- 
Iryl Spectacular acreage w/60 
mile views overlooking Sal- 
mon River. Mlns to Snake Riv- 
er, Hell's Canyon & National 
Forest. New gravel rd„ sur- 
veyed, warranty deed. Exc. fi- 
nancing. Best recreational 
spot In Idahol Call owner 
today 208-839-2501. 



568 



Out of Area 
Property 



CALIFORNIA 

Brown Ranch. Siskiyou Cty. No. 
Calif., adjacent to Ft. Jones, 318 
ac. working cattle ranch, abun- 
dant water rights, home, bam, 
pond, creek In the valley of the 
beautiful Marble Mlns. w/a vu ol 
Mt. Shasta. (213) 721-3467 
owner; (916) 466-5310 agt. 



NORTH CAROUNA 

Mount Airy Vic. By Owner. Must sell 
112 acs of boaut rollng mln land, 
trout stroams & ponds, all In timber, 
3/4 ml. off paved rd; wry pvt, 2 story 
brk colonial, 4 br. 3 full baths, full 
bsmt & 2 car gar., conv lo city & 
Inlrslaie. Will drv. Below mrkt value. 
S279K. 910-396-4409 eve. 



rwiSCONSINToRA"! 

|GqI Away From the City. Qreal| 
■CorpVlndlv. Retreat/Retlrementi 
'Property. 196 ac, hunting & rocre- 1 
(ation. Next to famous Buffalo | 
■ Country Big Buck Country.! 
■$1000/ac. Low R.E, Taxes, Creek' 
I Runs Thru IL Owner. 

715-B78-4798 

IDOOODODODOaUDarjOO 

MISSOURI 

720 acs. N.E. Missouri, 
j90% wooded, excellent 

deer & turkey hunting. 
^Blacktop location, rural 
: water. $375 per acre, 
: 016-265-4418 

fcnaac aanDaoDaooDaaoaooe 



HAUGRUD 
HOLLOW, WI 

Haven-For Sale by Owner. 
Boaut hillside setting 
w/dellghtful newer unique 
home on 35 ac. Lg gar/ out- 
bids/ spring/ stream thru 2 
pastures w/many deer & 
turkey In area. Wonderful 
place tor a few horses. Great 
wkend hideaway. Groat Idea 
for co-retreat prop. Plenty of 
room for add'l dvlpmt, $330K 
by Owner. 

608-637-3276 
Call for pics or appt 



•9 



WISCONSIN 

Sheboygan Co. 

For sale by owner - 76 ac 
wooded land, nature lovers 
dream, prime hunting land In 
town of Rhine. Deer hunters 
delight, privacy Is yours, 
easement avail, land nested 
in middle of section. 
Exquisite setting, sec! Isolat- 
ed, suitable lor bldg. 
$225K/offer principals only 

414-894-3008 



704 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



1994 24FT. COBRA PASS- 
PORT CLASSIC C MO- 
TORHOME on Ford chassis. 
1,800 miles. Must sell! Call for 
details. Ask tor Dick (847) 
223-1000. 



708 



Snowmabiies/ATV's 



1979 AHC1IC CAT, ELTI 
GRE 500, bored 10 over, 
new crank seals, S575. 1975 
Arctic Cat, Pantera 340, mint 
condition, new crank seals, 
$400, (B47) 566-0442. 

1996 INDY SPORT 440, 75 
miles, $3,500/firm. (847) 
546-2283, 

SNOWMOBILE 1988 
S.H.V., low miles, 2 up seat, 
excellent condition, $2,150. 
(847) 973-0761 , 

SNOWMOBILE 1995 VA- 
MAHA V-Max 600, red, excel- 
lent condition, cover, 
S3.500/firm, (815) 675-9305. 

SNOWMOBILE 1995 YA- 
MAHA V-MAX 4, 800cc, 950 
miles, carbides, 192 studs, ex- 
cellent condition, $5,900/best. 

(414)843-3387. 

SNOWMOBILES 1989 SKI- 
DOO Mach I. 1990 Skidoo 
Formula Plus. Both with new 
anginas. Plus, like new 2- 
placo trailer. Helmets includ- 
ad, $4,000 takes all! Must Sell! 
(414) 552-2699 home, (414) 
347-9397 work. 



710 



BoaJ/Molors/Elc. 



BOAT 1980 CENTURY with 
MerCrulser 120 I/O, $1,500. 
(847)973-1589. 

SAFE AND SECURE IN- 
SIDE STORAGE with police 
and fire protection for Boats, 
Cars and RVs. Only $18 a 
foot. Motorcycles and Waver- 
unners only $1 25. Pick up and 
delivery available. (847) 
356-2747, 

WANTED TO BUY USED 
12FT. PLUS aluminum row 
or John Boa!, Good condition. 
$150, (70S) 447-7922 alter 
6pm. 



t 

i- 




NovtMbER 15, 1996 UkeUNd Newspapers CLASSIFIED 



. - - *- >t 



TSZ 



nr- 



irtt D 91 * n "* * **~+ 



ED KEB 



Boat/Motors/Etc. 



710 


Roal/Molors/Elc, 



aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa 

RY, HEATED STORAGE | 

ecure, rural Grayslake location, per-S 
for boats and cars. Will be kept ag 
jconstant 55 degrees throughout the| 
j winter. 3 month minimum, approx. $90g 
j per month .depending on size. Keepg 
I your baby happy this winter. 



a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
c a 

EaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaM 



Call Bill for more information. 

(847) 223-8161. 



720 



•m 



Sports Equipment 



feB ROLLER PLUS TRAIN- 
ER, (as seen on TV), with 

S/ideo and exercise pad. Brand 
Rew Si 35.. Sell for. S75/best. 
P4 7) 973-0342. 

HFLE REMINGTON 

/OODMASTER number 
T42 30-06. Like new with (2) 5- 
shot clips. $350/1irm, (414) 
551-9095. 



ISOLOFLEX, ALL ATTACH- 
IMENTS included, S750/best. 
1(847)587-0718. 



804 



Cars for Sale 



804 



Cars For Sale 



^1970 OLDS CUTLASS 

^CONVERTIBLE. Value 

£$6,000. Will go 85,000/best. 

'(847) 487-7743. 

■1972 BUICK SKYLARK, 

67,800 miles. Great driving . 
car. I'm the second owner. 
S800/best. (647)223-2612. 

1984 CROWN VICTORIA. 
Fully loaded, 302. 

$1.000/best. (B47) 587-4348. 

1984 MERCURY COU- 
GAR, black with gray velour 
interior, 302 engine, power 
windows, power locks, power 
seats, power mirrors, sunroof, 
tinted windows, many new 
Parts. $1 ,500/best. (847) 
740^291. 

19B5 BUICK LESABRE 
LIMITED EDITION, lOOks 

good, runs well. Needs some 
transmission work. $900/best, 
(847)265-0125. " 

1985 .MUSTANG LX, 2- 
door, 4-speed, 30mpg, very 
good condition, S750. (847) 
689-0933. 

1986 CORVETTE RED 

Coupe, 15,000 actual miles, 
immaculate condition, must 
see. Evenings after 6pm (847) 
395-2112. 

1986, FORD WAGON, runs 

" great," very dependable, hitch 

included, S700. (847) 

587-4B14, 

1986 RENAULT 181, 5- 

speed. runs great, pretty 
clean. $600/best. (847) 
546-8328. 

1988 ACURA LEGEND ex- 
cellent condition, $6,500. 
' (847) 265-B557. 

1988 CAPRICE CLASSIC, 

4-door, full power, excellent 
condition, very dependable, 
average miles, must seel 
$3,000. (847) 265-9644. 

1988 LINCOLN TOWN 
CAR, 4-door, 90K miles, 
white, blue interior, white vinyl 
top, very dependable, newer 
brakes. Runs ' excellent. 
S4.500. (847) 223-3320. 

1988 MERCURY TRACER. 
Very clean car. Runs great. 
$525/best. (847) 546-8328. 

1989 DODGE- RAM 
CHARGER. V8, automatic, 
A/C, power steering, brakes, 
windows, door locks. $3,500. 
(847)587-0691. 

1989 HONDA ACCORD 
LXI HATCHBACK, new 
brakes, tires, muffler. Garage 
kept. $3,995. North Chicago 
Imports, 1220 Sheridan Rd., 
Monday-Friday? 8am-5pm. 
Saturday 8anvi2'pm. (847) 
473^448. 

1989 HONDA CIVIC DX, 
red, 3-door, 5-speed, fun, 
AM/FM cassette, A/C, 1 -own- 
er, $2,399/best. (847) 
540-5139. 

1991 GEO METRO. Must 
sell immediately! High miles, 
excellent runner, $2,500. 
(815) 653-3823. 

1991 HONDA CIVIC 
HATCHBACK, A/C, sunroof, 
AM/FM casselto, new tires, 
low mileage, original owner, 
$6,250. Antloch. (847) 872- 
6394 -days, (847) 838-0838 
evenings,- ..... - 



1994 3251 CONVERTIBLE. 
LOADED, Mid. Blue-grey 
leather Interior. CD changer, 
all power, all options Inc. rollo- 
ver protection. Excellent condi- 
tion, garage kept, like new. 
Serious inquiries only, 
$32,900. (847) 587-4119 
leave message. 

1994 CHEVY CAMARO 
Z28, V6, 5.7 liter, automatic, 
A/C, cruise, power wind- 
ows/locks, AM/FM cassette, 
low miles, like new still under 
warranty, $15,000/best. (847) 
473-1830. 

1996 BMW R1100RT, red, 
low miles, Corbin seat, Para, 
windshield, throttle look. 
$13,000/best. Call after 4pm 
ask for Mike D. (847) 356- 
2980. 

ARE YOU PAYING too 
much lor your auto In- 
surance? Save 15-20%. Free 
- no obligation price quote 1- 
800-542-8860 First Communl- 
ly Insurance Group. 

BUICK 1986 LESABRE sta- 
tion wagon, $450/best. (414) 
658-0832. 

CADILLAC 1986 FLEET- 
WOOD BROUGHM, Granny's 
carll Classy, with only 74K 
mllos. $3,295. (847) 
639-9359. 

CHEVROLET 1991 CA- 
PRICE, 113K. excellent con- 
dition, $5,500/besl. (414) 
652-2883. •>. •■ 

CHRYSLER 1989 LEBAR- 
ON, reliable, good condition, 
no rust. $3,500/best. (815) 
675-3605. ' 

CHRYSLER LEBARON 
GTC CONVERTIBLE. 
1994, V6, forest green with 
tan top/interior, new top, ABS, 
A/C, air bags, 7/70 warranty, 
mint, low miles, S11,700/best. 
(847) 548-6560. 

FORD 1973 GRAN TORN 
NO, 351 C, automatic, air, 
power steering/brakes, south- 
ern car. Very clean. Runs 
good, passed emissions, 

$2,500. (414) 694-6242. j 

FREE "NEW CAR BUY- 
ING GUIDE" when you order 
"Buy Autos, Boats, Planes, for 
2c on the $" and "Buy Used 
Cars The Smart Way'. $10 
TKT Industries, Box 631 A, 
Hlghwood, III. 60040. 

OLDSMOBILE 1975 OME- 
GA, 4-door, 59,000 miles, ex- 
cellent condition, no rust. 
(414) 654-1775 after 3pm. 

PONTIAC 1993 GRAND 
AM SE, V6, automatic, 4- 
door, air, cruise, cassette, 
power windows/locks, loaded, 
excellent condition. $8,000/ne- 
gollable. (414) 942-1540. 

PONTIAC 1995 GRAND 
PRIX SE, loaded with options, 
17,600 miles, $15,000/bost, 
(414) 942-0337. 

"PONTIAC CATALtNA 

CONVERTIBLE 1968, '1- 

x-wner, bought now. Beautiful 
condition. Must see. (847) 740- 
"4485. 



810 



Classic/Antique Cars 



1953 T-BIRD HARDTOP, 

new paint and interior, 84,000 
original miles, runs/looks 
great. $7,900. Eric (847) 
550-6150. 



814 



Services Parts 



CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP 

bodies. Factory new, guar- 
anteed from $1,300. Doors 
from $69.00, fenders from 
$50.00, beds from $800, bed- 
liners $169.00. BUMPERS, 
GRILLS. REPAIR PANELS, 
PAINTS, ABRASIVES, WIND- 
SHIELDS, RADIATORS. Deliv- 
ery. Mark's 21 7-824-61 84. 
MOVING SALE PONTIAU 
engine, big block 428, com- 
pletely ' rebuilt. $900. (847) 
" 546-840S. 
m.i |i)<!f2 | !fuv./.- Ii--.r> 'lOril-bf n. 



824 


Vans 

V 



CHEVY . CONVERSION 

VAN 1989, 1 -owner, air, tilt, 
cruise, AM/FM cassette, 
77,000 miles, $6,500. (847) 
587-B707 days, (815) 675- 
2811 evenings. 

GMC 1985 SAFARI 

CARGO VAN, no rust, 59K, 
well maintained, S2,400/best. 
(414)658-3405. 



828 



Four Wheel Drive 
Jeeps 



1982 TOYOTA WAGON, 

runs and looks good, 
$750/bost. (847) 83B-3436. 

1986 FORD DUALLY F- 
350, diesol, 4-wheel drive, utili- 
ty box with rack, 9ft. bed, runs 
and looks like new, $10,500. 
(847) 223-1883. 

1993 CHEVY Z71 1500 
SILVERADO, exlra cab, 4x4. 
S15,900/best. Like newl (414) 
877-4225 leave message. 

1994 JEEP GRAND CHER- 
OKEE V6 4x4, air condition- 
ing, AM/FM cassette, ABS sys- 
tem, extended warranty, mint 
condition, low mites. 
$20,000/best. (847) 
669-9131. 

CHEVROLET 1988 SUB- 
URBAN, 4-wheel drive, 3/4 
ton, high mites but well main- 
tained, runs great. 
S5,600/best. (414) 248-8248, 

CUSTOM 4X4 JEEP New 

373 front and back gears. New 
master cylinder, shocks, bat- 
tery alternator, chrome head- 
ers and J pipes. Lifted, center 
line rims 33' tires. All fiber- 
glass body. ...Much-Much 
More. Must see. $5,200. 
(847)740-7380 ask tor Kim. 



834 


Trucks/Trailers 



1985 CHEVY S-10 PICKUP, 
$1.000. (847)548-6255. 

1987 FORD RANGER, high 
mileage, runs great, 

S2,000/bosl. (847) 546-2283. 

1987 MAZDA TRUCK 4X4 
LONGBED, white, nice condi- 
tion, 5-speed, $3,000/best. 
(847)680-8147. 

FORD 1994 RANGER, 
21,000 hlghwaymites, au- 
tomatic, V6, air, am/fm cas- 
sette. Asking $9,500. (414) 
654-7266. 

FORD FULL SIZE alumi- 
num cap, white, 2yrs. old, ex- 
cellent condition, $250/best. 
(847)662-1980. 



844 


Motorcycles 



19U4 uuarOM HARLEY 
DAVIDSON SPORTSTER, 

lots of chrome, 6" extended 
forks, S & S carburator. Must 
see. $6,500. (847) 740-7380 
ask for Kim. 



S30 



Firewood 



ffi* 



FANTASTIC 
FIREWOOD 

Z yr. old seasoned hardwood oak, 

ash, maple, cherry. $64,00 per 

face confynixed $74.00 per lace 

cord 100% oak. 

Free stacking and delivery. 

Buy the wood tliat's guaranteed to 

bum. 

(847) 546-3613 • (815) 344-9522 
1-800-430-6262 



4 



ife= 



=c£ 



FIREWOOD 

UNLIMITED 

Season -2 years 

Free, Fast Delivery 

Prompt Courteous 

Service! Credit Cards 

Accepted 

Mixed Hardwoods $69 

F.C, Oak $78 

Cherry Birch Hickory Mix $84 

Discount on 2 or more 

1-630-87&-OI1I 



S39 


Housekeeping 



S39 


Housekeeping 


Experienced 
i: Interior Painter ii 
iiand Faux Finisher:: 

1 i Call 1 1 
:i POLO PAINTING:; 

i: af 847-838-4317:: 

; ; or page 

i 708-348-7884- jj 
'• '♦«»»*>♦♦«««*♦*»♦»»♦♦♦: : 


S57 


Painting/Decorating 



S84 



Roofing/Siding 




Tree/Plants 



REASONABLE ROOFING 
AND CONSTRUCTION. All 
types of roofs, siding, addi- 
tions, etc. Quality work for rea- 
sonable price. No Job too big 
or too small. Call for free es- 
timate (847) 546-5985. 



1ABBREVIATI0NS 

J 



S87 


Storage 



PRECISE PAINTING 

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR. 

•Nov/ construction or wo 

can make It look like newl 

•Expert Wallpaper 

Removal 

♦Wall Repair. 

•Ready to be painted 

or papered. 

Call us about 

Reasonable Rates. 

Refundable $25 estimate 

charge deducted from 

cost of job contract 

(B47) 740-0725 

(647) 395-0490. 



HEATED STORAGE WITH 
ALARM, for cars, boats, 
RV's, motocycles, etc. Low 
rates. Libertyville (847) 
680-1978. 

RECYCLE 



i i TREE & STUMP 
REMOVAL 

' > Land Clearing 
! ', Wholesale Seasoned 
; I Hardwood 

; ; Nordstrom Tree 
; Experts Co. 

!; (Fully Insured) 

If 847-526-0858 



S99 



Miscellaneous 
Services 




TRICKY DICK 
SNOWPLOWING 

Small shopping centers, 

driveways and salting. 

Insured. 

(847) 546-5363. 



Help us Help 
Qpphaned Pets 



S72 



Professional 
Services 



CAN YOU BELIEVE??? 

You can make $$$ and 

feel appreciated!! 

For cleaning homes or 

offices. I'll teach you how to 

start your own cleaning 

business 

In your home or mine. 

Fees Vary. 

Joan 

Mean Maldsl 

We Hate & Tormtnate 

Dirt!! 



Lakeland Newspapers sponsors! 
a *Pet of the Week" each issue 
featuring an orphan from 
"Orphans of the Storm," helping 
to g'rve good homes to many' 
pets. 

r To cover the costs we are asking' 
tor sponsors at $50 for 5 weeks/ 
which will be published above the J 
pets bio in all 13 of our Lake I 
County papers. 



For more information or to become 
a sponsor call Dave or Greg at 

(847) 223-8161. 



ss^^mmj 




Ho Ho 

Seasonal 

Opportunities 

Are 

Here! 



We will be running our special "Seasonal 

Opportunities" section from 10/4/96 - 12/31/96. 

For any 1x3 or larger ad placed in this section we 

will run the second week at HALF PRICE. 

Reserve your space today and get the best 

quali fed "Elves" for your seasonal needs! 



Lakeland 



Newpapers 



847-223-8161 XllO or 112 

Greg or David 

Fax: 847-223-8810 



COMMENDABLE CLEAN- 
ERS COME home to a clean 
house! ,2-weekday openings 
for new clients, Call Sharon 
(647) 731-0823. 

HOUSECLEANING 
Blll-Joyco 

8am-5pm. 
Monday-Friday. 

Senior rate, 
(847) 356-8876. 

I WILL CLEAN YOUR 
HOUSE on a weekly/bi-week- 
ly basis, Very thorough, de- 
pendable. Non-smoker. Refer- 
ences. (847) 546-3759 leave 
message. 



It is nearing the cold and 
flu season.*. 

Call Dave or Greg at 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

to list your school 

in our Substitute 

directory section in 

classifieds. 

223-8161 

TODAY 




Air conditioning - AC 
or 
Air. 
Anti-lock Brakes - 
ABS 

Automatic - 
Transmission - 

Auto or AT 
Average - Avg. 

B 
Battery - Batt. 
Between - Btwn. 
Black - Blk. 
Brakes - Brks. 
Brown - Brwn. 

C 
Carburetor - Carb. 
Cassette - Cass. 
Certified miles - Cert 

ml. 
Condition - Cond. 
Convertible - Convt 
Cruise Control - 
Cruise 
Cylinder- Cyl. 

D 
Dealer - Dlr. 
Door(s) - DR 

Engine - Eng. 
Equipment/Equipped \ 



Equip. 
Excellent - Exc. 

F - 
Financing - Fin. 
Four Wheel Drive - 
4WD 
G 
iGarage - Gar. 

Hatchback - Htchbk. 
or 

HB 
Horsepower - HP 
Hardtop - Hrdtp. 

Immaculate - Immac. 
Interior - Int. 

K 
|Thousand - K 

Leather - Lthr. 

M 
Miles r Ml 
Moonroof - Mnrf. 
Maintenance - MaJnt. 
Manufacturer - Mfr. or 

Mfg. 
Miles per gallon • 
MPG 
O 
Or best offer - OBO 
Offer -Ofr. 
Option(s) - Opt(s). 

P 
Power Brakes - PB 
Power Doors - PD 
Power Locks - PL 
Power Steering - PS 
Power Windows - PW 

R 
Radials - Rad. 
Records - Rec. 
Rear Window Defog 
RWD 
S 

Sacrifice - Sac. 
Speed - Spd. 
Sunroof - Snrf. 

T 
Tires - Trs. 
Trailer Hitch - Trl. 
Htch. 
Transmission - Trans. 

V 
Very good condition - 
VGC 
W 
Warranty - Warn 
|Wheel(s) - Whl(s). 
White - Wht. 
Whitewalls - W/W 
gwith - W/ 



; 



i 



I 



MFCS BRANDS 

General Motors 

Cadillac - CAD 
Chevrolet - CHEVY 
Pontiac - PONT 
Oldsmobite - OLDS 

Ford Motors 

Lincoln - LING. 
Mercury - MERC 

Chrysler Corp. 

Plymouth - PLYM 
Chrysler - CHRYS 
Dodge - DOD 



Other 

|Volkswagon - VW 
Mitsubishi - MITSU 
Honda - HON 




Irtpa 
lr.Plrt£)<3 uuhfll 



! 



— *- * &3^;<f^;&t^«»^^ j * - 



•--•'■ 



WM "J3n*23A.I3 .^nsy.q ~t iA tw.M* i dm ^f MwiaypW 




CLASSIFIED "LAkilANd Newspapers NovcMbcR 15, 1996 




Z * 





Ivake^lanci Newspapers 

is proud to present our 

1996 

Once again, we're offering this special feature. Perfect for those spe- 
cial holiday get togethers. This song book will promise to include 
some of the seasons best yule-tide carols! 

Our Holiday Song Book will be inserted into all 13 of our Lakeland 
Newspapers the week of December 5, giving plenty of time to enjoy 
during the festive season. You won't want to miss out on the oppor- 
tunity to be included in this keepsake edition by extending your holi- 
day greetings or other special advertising to the entire Lake County 

Area, reaching over 54-,000 homes. 

Hurry Deadline is Friday, November 29th. 



JLvQJt^CAclXLCL Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St., P.O.Box 268, 

Grayslake, 1L 60030 

(847) 223-8161 or Fax: (847) 223-8810 



Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 



wKliMtLmm 



To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



■ A. 

WELCOME 

HOME 

CLEANING 

WE'LL CLEAN 
YOUR HOME 

quickly, thoroughly, at a price 

you can afford. Call Welcome 

Home Cleaning at 

(847)26 5-7366 

for a tree estimate. 



ATM 
...complete... 

PAINTING & 
DECORATING 

COMMERClAL-REStDENTlAL-INDUSTRlAL 
40 YEARS OF SATISFIED 
CUSTOMERS/ PROMPT AFFORD- 
ABLE PROFESSIONAUSM 
FULLY INSURED...FHEE ESTIMATES 

(847) 546-7926 






FREE CLASSIFIED AD'S! 

NO FEE TO SEARCH! 

LOW FEE TO SELL! 

NO SIZE OR ITEM LIMITS! 

NO DEADLINES! 

CHANGE OR CANCEL ANY TIME! 

SAVETIMEAND MONEY BY 

LISTING WITH US! 

CALL ONE OF OUR OPERATORS 

TODAY FOR DETAILS! 

COMPU-AD 
847-587-0411 , 



Seal Coating 
Fall Discount 15% off 
Insured Free Estimates 

•Quality Sea Imaster* Products 

• Sealcoating By Hand * 
•Prevents Oxidation 

• Resists Gas & Oils 
•Wealherproofs 

• Beautifies Pavements 

•Low Maintenance/Economical 

Locally Owned & Operated 

PAYLESS PAVING 
847-360-8013 



CREATIVE EXTERIOR CONCEPTS, INC. 



«© Save 10% Up to $500 qgji 

Siding l/V •■Roofing 

Vinyl Windows jF » • Soffit & r-ascia 

Bays & Bows ; 'E • Gutters 

Patio Doors m A i I . Doors 

Licensed, Insured and Bonded 



(847)726-1060 



TO PLACE 

YOUR AD HERE 

CALL 

847-223-8161 



□ no 



****************** 

Painting, Wallpapering * 
Expert Installation J 

Paper* I«ubrlc»VTjhyl > - J 



* 
* 
* 



J DECORATING* 



I mm, ,--«,, 

****************** 




wmt 



BLACKTOP PAVING 

■ Driveways Built, Repaired & 
Extended At Affordable Prices 
FREE ESTIMATES 

Grading, Leveling, & Excavating 

GRAVEL DRIVEWAYS 

Built, Repaired, & Extended 
BLACK DIRT & TOPSOIL 

Sflnd Grovel Stone Clav nil 

ID.E.R. ENTERPRISES 

Don Rowdcn Owner • Call Anytime 
(847)546-8334 (847)546-4500 






INFINITE INTERNET SOLUTIONS 

Your Competition is on the Internet-are YOU? 

• Internet marketing for small to midsized businesses. 

• Business & personal Internet research 

• Internet training & support 

Contact IIS to find out how you & your business can benefit from 

today's most powerful tool for business & personal advancement 

(847)546-6204 

jzemba@iwc.net 



■™ ■*& 




A ************************* ****** A* 

I ME/TAR 



Digital Satellite J 
No equipment to buy! t 

Ask about our 
$99 or LIKE FREE i 

installation * 

.70&-33S-8I10...! 



jnni>>mm^ nun nnn.nmnim> i i |j|i 



New Century Remodeling 

(since 1955) 
• Roofing •Aluminum siding/gut- 
ters »Brick work *Ccment work 
•Carpentry •Thermal windows- 
double hung, bays, bows & sliders. 

"ft Free Estimates 
■ft Finance Available 



'(847) 680-1455 




iMMMMi'Htittiilil*tiilil||MtliitMliiWitHMiiH!iiMHIMfHMMMhMMil liiiintmr. 



i\ 



<+*-*A « -t ■ * ■ km m B<^^^l__JL_JVM». 



WOOD 

Mixed Seasoned 

Hardwood. 

$65 a face cord 

delivered and 

stacked. 

a (847)566-9372 



1 



' — -il ~ r J 



FLOORS U WALK ON, tod I 



carpets • Hardwood • Ceramic • vinyl I 

Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling | 

Residential & Commercial Installation . 



******************************************************** 




ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

FREE 
ESIBMTES | 

(847)336-2500. 

(847) 3105220 J 

■■ ■■! tarn mm vJ 



NovEMbEit 15, 1996 UkEUNd Newspapers CLASSIFIED^ _ 



it 



'i 



Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 




-To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 




REACH 40,000,000 KMTERMET 

USERS AND SELL YOUR 

PRODUCT OR SERVICE ON THE 

INFORMATION SUPER HIGHWAY! 



.IMMEDIATE RESPONSE 
► THE BEST RESULTS 
» THE LOWEST COST 
•FIRST MONTH FREE! 



■fl CALL VAL AT; 




847-526-5758 



• ••LOW RATES ••• 
HEANEVS INSIDE 

RV STORAGE 

$12.00 per ft. 20' or under 
$13.00 per ft. 21' or over* 

•Also applies toTVallcrs & Motor Homes 

Cars - Popups $35 per mo. 

•Storage Available on other R.V.'s + P.W.C 

(847) 587-9100 




MMMWU 



We will clean your home 
or small business 




>WE ARE BACK* 

lust what you hive been looking Tor. 
Keep your locks up. 

$10.00 per pair 

2 pairs for $19.00 

Sent Fin) CJiii Prepaid 
(Include name A •ddraa) 



SoncJ chock or 

'■• monoy order to: 

STAY UP 

P.O. BOX 1 505 LL 

MORTON 'QROVE; IL 

60053-7505 




rFANTAOTCl 
FIREWOOD 

2 yr. old seasoned hard- 
wood oak, ash, maple, 
cherry $64.00 per feice 
cord mixed $74.00 per 
face cord 100% oak 
Free stacking & delivery 
Buy the wood that's 
guaranteed to burn 

(847) 546-3613 
(815) 344-9522 
1-800-430-6262 



p 




ROOF 
REPAIR 

1/2 Down, Balance when Leaks stop. 

Reroofing-Tearoffs-Flats 

*WiU meet any comparable price* 

*TUCK POINTING* 

Gutter cleaning, siding repair 

and gutter repair. 

ALL TYPES OF HOME 

IMPROVEMENT 
ALL TYPES OF ROOFING 
Stale licensed, Liability workmen's comp. 
(847)838-0353 
NO JOB TOO SMALL 



BASEMENT SPECIAL 



$500" 
OFF 

wllb COUpOO 

finishing or Remodeling iny 

Bate meat valued at 

S3 ,500 or more 

Explra 12-1-96 



KITCHENS & BATHS 



$250 M 
OFF 

will coupon 

Remodeling any Bull or Kitchen 

valued it SJ J00 or more 

Expires 12-1-96 



A-AMERICAN 




PAINTING 

HOME IMPROVEMENT 

(847) 949-9592 

COMMERCIAL & 
RESIDENTIAL 
nrtantnttj (2 **» 
qj rnnCcni ken 

H t»ffl QUnn 

GJ WS*nl**p«*(t2*'l><" 

NO JOBS TOO SMAUJ 
* QUALITY WORK* 
REASONABLE RATES 

* ALL WORK GUVWIEED* 
* INSURED * 



FALL PAINTING SPECIAL 



$75°° 
PER ROOM 

Labor Only • with coupon 
tctu 

30T 

painting 
Expires 12-20-96 



Filling hqles or exacts .Rime Jnd 



W 



TILE SPECIAL 



$50^off 
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Any Tile Work- 
Kiiclicn or Baths 

Expires 12-20-96 



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BASEMENTS 

Siding • Soffit ■ Windows 

• Kitchen * Decks 

• Bathrooms 

FREE ESTIMATES 

plus references 

CALL JACK AT 

(847) 546-3759 




£DECKSAVERS+£ 

£, Pressure Washing ^ 
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jfc •Decks -Siding jl, 

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Pressure Treated Wood is v 
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Maple Leaf 
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Commercial/Residential 

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L. Horton 

(847) 726-8653 




Over 40 years of 
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basements 
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526-150C 

Waucor.dA 



General Contractors 



J CONTRACTORS ELECTRIC SERVIcST 

/ ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR^ 

/ "Call Us For Fast Courteous Service" 

33265 N.Rte. 45' 

• Wildwood, IL 60030 

(847) 223-4682 

RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL 

717 



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-AUTO LOANS- 

As low As $99 down 

Auto dealer will arrange 

financing even if you have 

been turned down before. 

Loans available for no credit, 

bad credit and bankruptcy 

buyers. No cosigners needed. 

Call Becky 

847-587-2055 



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NO ATTORNEYS, FAST SIMPLE, NO WAITING 



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BUSINESS PLANS - RESUMES AND MORE 
CALL FOR ADDITIONAL SERVICES OFFERED 

WE THE PEOPLE BUSINESS CENTER 

(847) 548-1300 



OUR 

QUALITY IS 

EVERYWHERE 




From architecturally designed 
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construction,..you get quality and 
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RECYCLE! 

Cash For 

• Aluminum Cans 

• All Other Scrap Metals 

Industrial Accounts Welcome 

Chicago Surplus 

11304 260th Avenue 
Trevor. Wl 



Pricm Subject To Chang* 

LOCATION: Trevor Wl (5 minuTes 
Nonh ol Aniioch) Take Hwy C one 
mile west ol Rome 83 Turn North on 
259lh SI . Veer lo led (or 2 blocks (next 
lo Foxy's Tavern) 

Mon. • Fri. 8:30 am • 5 pm 

Saturday 8:30 am - 3:30 pm 

(414) 862-2517 

(414) 862-2554 



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County Line Builders 
General Contractors 

437 S. Main St. 
Wauconda, IL 60084 




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George's | 
Decorating | 

.Paint & Wallpaper 

g Interior & Exterior 

General Repairs 

Quality Work 

Free Estimates 

Written Guarantee 

(847) 348-5110 

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CONSTRUCTION » GENERAL CARPENTRY 

•Custom Decks 

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INSURED & BONDED 
FREE ESTIMATES 

(414) 889-8442 

Please Call Gary Kolkau 




TOP PRICE 
PAID 

We pay more for old or 
scrap gold. No amount 
too small or too large! 

(847J 
438-0125 




ACE COMPUTER SERVICES 

We teach you the Internet. 

1 on 1 training 

Your place or ours. Can teach 

you on our computers. 

Appointments available now. 

We do upgrades and servicing. 

We can backup your data. 

Reasonable rates, call now!! 

Spring Grove, IL 

847-973-2037 



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Licensed 

Insured 

FREE 

Estimates 



ROOFING: 

SIDING & TRIM 

SEAMLESS GUTTERS 

WINDOWS* DOORS 

DECKS •AWNINGS 

Repair & insurance Work 

(847) 438-6634 



Quality 

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/ 



DONT THROW AWAY 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR] 
LAMP DOCTORS, 
FOR REPAIRS. 

WARREN ELECTRIC INC. 

33261 N. Highway 45 

Wildwood, IL 60030 

(847) 223-8691 




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